New threats to journalists’ sources

first_img February 22, 2021 Find out more RSF condemns Facebook’s blocking of journalistic content in Australia November 10, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 New threats to journalists’ sources Organisation Receive email alerts Google experiments drop Australian media from search results News News RSF_en AustraliaAsia – Pacific Newscenter_img Help by sharing this information January 21, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders condemns the Northern Territory police for secretly accessing the telephone records of Darwin-based reporter Justin O’Brien in an attempt to identify a confidential source, and for threatening legal action against him.The press freedom organization expresses its full support for O’Brien and his newspaper, the Northern Territory News, and shares his concern that the police had access to sources and materials beyond the particular items targeted.The police launched their investigation in an attempt identify O’Brien’s source for a Northern Territory News report about a police raid on the home of Darwin mayor Graeme Sawyer. Police in the state of Victoria admitted a similar intrusion into Herald Sun journalists’ phone records in September.Reporters Without Borders said it was ironic that the police were behaving in this manner at the very time that the Australian parliament was moving to amend the Evidence Act so as to offer journalists some protection for the confidentiality of their sources.“We reject this sort of police infringement into media freedom in democracies such as Australia,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Jean-François Julliard said. “Journalists perform an important Fourth Estate role in society and find their role compromised if confidential sources are intimidated by such actions.”“I am not going to be revealing my source,” O’Brien told Reporters Without Borders. “I am willing to take the stand and say I will not reveal my source. I haven’t committed an offence and they have accessed my phone records to try to find out my sources. There is no guarantee of the length of time they have been looking back.”O’Brien said he had done several stories relating to immigration detention centres and other matters with confidential sources used as contacts.Northern Territory News deputy editor Matt Cunningham said the newspaper planned to file a complaint about the police actions with the Northern Territory ombudsman.Reporters Without Borders is especially alarmed by comments made by Northern Territory police commissioner John McRoberts to ABC Radio on 9 November, when he implied that the reporter might have committed an offence simply by receiving information from a police whistleblower.“Such comments appear to be a classic case of ‘shooting the messenger’, which is all the more disturbing when it comes from a senior police officer,” Julliard said. The organization calls on all the state and territory governments in Australia to implement similar protection for journalists’ confidential sources to that proposed at the national level.Links to the Northern Territory News reports: http://www.ntnews.com.au/article/2010/11/05/192081_ntnews.htmlhttp://www.ntnews.com.au/article/2010/11/04/191921_ntnews.htmlhttp://www.ntnews.com.au/article/2010/11/09/192831_ntnews.htmlhttp://www.ntnews.com.au/article/2010/11/08/192461_ntnews.htmlLink to ABC report: http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/11/09/3061220.htm?section=justinLink to the Herald Sun incident: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/spy-force-exposed/story-e6frf7… AustraliaAsia – Pacific News to go further Follow the news on Australia On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia November 19, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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SUU Falls To Idaho State In Cross Country Dual Meet

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPOCATELLO, Idaho-Saturday, Idaho State hosted a dual cross country meet with Southern Utah in both men’s and women’s competition at the ISU Bengal Invitational.In the women’s 6-K, Idaho State bested Southern Utah 23-32 as unattached Jenica Dodge took the individual title in a time of 25:08.50.The Thunderbirds were represented in the Top 10 by Samantha Taylor (3rd place), Haley Tanne (6th place), Brighton Glassman (7th place) and Josie Bushar (10th place).For the men, Idaho State edged Southern Utah 28-29 with the Bengals’ Wyatt Diderickson taking the individual title in a time of 21:15:00.Thunderbird men finishing in the Top 10 included Michael Finch (2nd place), Thomas Grant (4th place), Sage Ducote (5th place) and Mark Bennett (6th place). Tags: Brighton Glassman/Cross Country/Haley Tanne/Idaho State/Jenica Dodge/Josie Bushar/Mark Bennett/Michael Finch/Sage Ducote/Samantha Taylor/Southern Utah/Thomas Grant/Wyatt Diedrickson Brad James September 22, 2018 /Sports News – Local SUU Falls To Idaho State In Cross Country Dual Meetlast_img read more

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Utah State Linebacker David Woodward Named As Quarter Finalist For Lott IMPACT Trophy

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOGAN, Utah-Wednesday, Utah State football junior linebacker David Woodward was named as a quarter finalist for the Lott IMPACT trophy as confirmed by the organization.Woodward leads the nation with four forced fumbles, is second nationally in tackles per game (14.2 stops per game) and 34th nationally in fumble recoveries with one.Woodward is one of 20 quarter finalists nationally and the only one from the Beehive State for this award.The Lott IMPACT trophy recognizes the student-athlete who makes the largest impact both on and off the field.Categories consist of integrity, maturity, performance, academics, community and tenacity. Tags: David Woodward/Lott IMPACT Trophy/USU Football October 10, 2019 /Sports News – Local Utah State Linebacker David Woodward Named As Quarter Finalist For Lott IMPACT Trophy Brad James Written bylast_img read more

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USS Mason Receives New Chemical Agent Detection Capability

first_img View post tag: USS Share this article February 16, 2012 Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Mason Receives New Chemical Agent Detection Capability View post tag: capability View post tag: Navy View post tag: New View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Detection View post tag: Mason View post tag: Chemical USS Mason Receives New Chemical Agent Detection Capability View post tag: Agent Equipment & technology View post tag: receives A new automated chemical warfare agent detection capability that successfully passed operational tests aboard USS Mason (DDG 87) will be installed on warships throughout the fleet, Navy officials announced Feb. 15.The Navy plans to install the new system – designed to quickly alert warfighters to the presence of chemical warfare agents – on all active guided-missile destroyers and cruisers, aircraft carriers, large and small deck amphibious ships, littoral combat ships and dry cargo/ammunition ships by the end of 2018.“IPDS-LR (Improved Point Detection System – Lifecycle Replacement) will provide the Navy continued chemical warfare agent detection, identification and alerting along with the high system reliability they need to perform their mission worldwide,” said Bruce Corso, IPDS-LR system manager, office of the Joint Project Manager for Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Contamination Avoidance (JPM NBCCA).“This successful deployment of the IPDS-LR is a culmination of the work of some great scientists and engineers, collaboration with the joint community, and having waterfront locations that provide continuous fleet interaction,” said Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) Chemical, Biological and Radiological (CBR) Defense Division Head Mike Purello.Warfighters aboard Mason – the first guided-missile destroyer (DDG) protected by IPDS-LR – are now relying on a better performing system that features ion mobility spectrometry. This chemical detection technology creates ions that separate by the time it takes the ion clusters to traverse a constant electric field drift region. “I am excited to have the Improved Point Detection System – Lifecycle Replacement on board,” said Mason Commanding Officer Cmdr. Adan Cruz, after testing concluded Jan. 27. “As captain, I hold the responsibility for the safety of the crew and this system provides enhanced chemical warfare defense to ensure our sailors will return home safely.” “The install went extremely well,” said Mason Executive Officer Cmdr. Mike Briggs. “Having a reliable chemical detection system onboard to aid in ship’s defense goes towards making Mason a more effective warship.”Teams based in Norfolk, Va., and San Diego, Calif., are prepared to install the new system on 35 ships in 2012.USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110), USS Howard (DDG-83) and USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) are the next ships on NSWCDD CBR Defense Division’s schedule for IPDS-LR installation.“More DDGs will follow,” said NSWCDD IPDS-LR Project Lead Brian Flaherty. “The Sailor will see a system they can turn on and be confident it is protecting them. It samples air from outside the ship, evaluates it for the presence of chemical warfare agents and if there’s an agent present – IPDS-LR will alert them in an adequate amount of time to take precautionary measures.”IPDS-LR components located on the port and starboard sides of a ship sample air through external intakes in the hull. The system analyzes the external air for chemical agents. “If the detector identifies a chemical agent, it sends a signal that displays an alert at both the ship’s damage control central and the bridge,” said Flaherty. “The system also interfaces directly to the ship’s chemical alarm, which broadcasts an audible ship-wide alarm to alert the crew of a chemical warfare agent.”IPDS-LR’s test and evaluation involved extensive time both in the laboratory and aboard ship – with extensive time at sea as well as an independent underway evaluation by the Navy’s commander operational test and evaluation force. “The new system is more maintainable and reliable,” said Flaherty. “Warfighters will see improved false alarm performance and longer periods of time between repairs. It will be easier and cheaper to repair.”Based on a commercial-off-the-shelf concept, a joint team of NSWCDD and JPM NBCCA engineers evaluated IPDS-LR in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) tests emphasizing a Navy shipboard maritime environment.The team collected more than 14,000 hours of underway and in-port test time supporting the RAM analysis with multiple ships – and ship classes – based in the Norfolk and San Diego areas. Additional data collection continued aboard ships in forward deployed locations. “It’s very rewarding to field this system to the Fleet,” said Flaherty, noting that his team conducted “IPDS-LR tests on the Navy side – shock testing, vibration testing, electromagnetic interference – and worked with different groups over two-and-a-half years to make sure the system is ready to field to the warfighter.”“The Navy’s CBR Defense Division exists to provide our warfighter with the tools and capabilities necessary to detect, protect, and if necessary, decontaminate threats resulting from a CBR attack,” said Purello. “Our direct and active connection with the fleet helps the warfighter and provides a wealth of valuable information for our scientists and engineers in the lab. This knowledge is immediately put to use as they work to create, develop, and provide updates and future solutions for our men and women in uniform.”A Navy leader in CBR Defense, NSWC Dahlgren’s CBR Defense Division provides a full complement of capabilities that support the naval warfighter both on land and at sea as well as the joint and Homeland Defense communities.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , February 16, 2012 View post tag: Navallast_img read more

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SEBELEN, DARMYS O.

first_img29, passed away on March 10, 2017, at her home. Darmys was born in Santiago, Dominican Republic, and has been residing in Bayonne. She worked as a Billing Clerk for Doctor Joseph Ibrahim in Bayonne. She is the daughter of Josefina Estrella (nee: Urena) and the late Oscar Sebelen. Sister of Patricia Sebelen, Alec Martinez, Oscar Sebelen and Marlon Sebelen. Granddaughter of Ramon Urena and his late Wife Maria, and the late Rafael Sebelen and Ramona Alberto. Niece of Emanuel Urena, Alexandra Urena, Yngrid Urena, Charlie Urena, and Eva Karina Urena. Funeral arrangements by G. KEENEN O’BRIEN Funeral Home, 984 Avenue C.last_img

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New Bulkheads Sought to Prevent Flooding, Protect Neighborhood and Marinas

first_imgCity Council handled a busy agenda involving bulkheads, a beach replenishment project and upgrades to the Music Pier. By Donald WittkowskiOcean City officials met Thursday with marina owners in the 300 block of Bay Avenue to devise plans to alleviate the perennial flooding that leaves the surrounding neighborhood and roads swamped with stormwater.First Ward Councilman Michael DeVlieger, who organized the informal strategy session, said local residents and the marina owners are united in wanting to see a continuous bulkhead built at Third Street to prevent bayfront flooding.“I think when you have two parties that want something, the odds of getting it done are greater,” DeVlieger said Thursday night while briefing members of City Council on the meeting.However, state environmental restrictions have hampered plans for the new bulkheading so far. Councilman Keith Hartzell, who joined DeVlieger and City Business Administrator Jim Mallon at the meeting with four marina owners, said the regulations are so strict that they would literally require owners to run the new bulkhead “through their house.”“It seems kooky,” Hartzell said.Hartzell acknowledged that it will be a “long haul” to secure regulatory approvals to build the proposed bulkheading.“I think the goal right now is to get everyone on the same page, and I think that’s coming,” he said.DeVlieger echoed Hartzell’s comments by noting that “enthusiasm” is building among the marina owners and local homeowners for the bulkheading plan.“It’s a win-win for everybody,” he said.Currently, not all of the property owners have bulkheads. In other cases, the existing bulkheads are deteriorated. Without a continuous bulkhead running along the bay at Third Street, the floodwaters continue to flow into the neighborhood.Michael Baker International, a city environmental and engineering consultant, will study options to ease the flooding, including the possibility of building new bulkheads.DeVlieger, whose ward includes the Third Street neighborhood and adjacent marinas, estimated that new bulkheading would solve 90 percent of the problem. He said the bulkheads would complement the city’s plan to build a series of pumping stations in the north end to flush stormwater off the streets faster.The new bulkheading would also help to protect the marinas. DeVlieger and Hartzell said the marinas are a key part of Ocean City’s business community and should be helped before they disappear altogether.“There are only a handful left and we want them to stay in business. They’re part of Ocean City’s culture,” DeVlieger said in an interview after the Council meeting.In other business, Council members Peter Madden and Tony Wilson were unanimously reappointed president and vice president, respectively, of the governing body for the next 12 months. It will be the second straight year Madden and Wilson have held those posts.Tony Wilson, left, and Peter Madden were reappointed as City Council’s vice president and president, respectively.Also Thursday, Council approved a resolution that is a first step toward getting the city’s north end beaches replenished with new sand this fall, months before the project was supposed to get underway.The resolution grants the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers access over the city’s right-of-way to begin the project, Mallon explained.Ocean City is now on a regular three-year cycle for beach replenishment projects funded by the Army Corps of Engineers. Although the city hadn’t been scheduled for its next round of beach replenishment until 2018, the plans have been accelerated to begin the north end project by the fall and have it completed by next March.“We’ll definitely have a north end beach replenishment sometime this fall,” Mallon told Council.In another matter Thursday, Council awarded a contract for large video screens that will enhance the experience for concertgoers at Ocean City’s Music Pier.The project will be paid for by a $151,000 donation from the fund-raising arm of the Ocean City Pops, the hometown orchestra. Jon Batastini, chairman of the Friends of the Ocean City Pops, announced the donation on June 8.Starlite Productions International Inc. of Moorestown will install video screens and cameras at the Music Pier under a $151,961 contract. Batastini said he hopes the project will be completed in time for the Pops’ “A Night in Old Vienna” concert on Sept. 13.Two, 120-inch video screens are planned on the walls on both sides of the Music Pier’s stage, which will allow orchestra fans to enjoy the concerts in an entirely new way. The large-screen format will capture the action on stage much better, right up to the facial expressions of the performers, Batastini said.“The people sitting in the back of the audience will be able to appreciate the passion that the entertainers put into their performances because now they’ll be able to see it,” he said.Batastini noted that the screens will also allow the Pops to incorporate movie clips with the concerts to complement the music, giving the audience an even livelier and fuller experience.Concertgoers will be able to enjoy closer views of the Ocean City Pops after new big-screen technology is installed in the Music Pier. (Courtesy Ocean City Pops)In addition, two, 90-inch video screens will be located at the back of the Music Pier to give concertgoers sitting in the “cheap seats” a better view of the orchestra.The video technology complements the city’s efforts to elevate the Music Pier’s status in the entertainment industry. The city has made a push to bring high-profile acts to the Boardwalk concert hall to bolster the summer entertainment scene.In other business, Council recognized the late Maryellen Farrell for her contributions to the community, including her avid support of the Humane Society of Ocean City. Farrell, 68, died June 20 of leukemia.“She made a difference in our town,” Hartzell said, while calling Farrell an “incredible woman.”Farrell was named 2016 Volunteer of the Year by the Humane Society. She was often seen walking the dogs at the animal shelter. Her husband, Gene, and volunteers from the Humane Society attended the Council meeting as part of the ceremony honoring Farrell.“She not only loved the dogs, she loved the dog walkers,” Gene Farrell said.After thanking Council for honoring his wife, Farrell closed his remarks by calling Maryellen a “great lady” who made him “a lucky guy.”Gene Farrell, center, in green shirt, joins members of City Council as they honor his late wife, Maryellen Farrell, for her contributions to the community.last_img read more

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Greggs takes delivery of three hybrid trucks

first_imgGreggs has taken delivery of three new hybrid refrigeration units designed to help lower its environmental impact of its logistics in central London.The new T- and UT-Series Hybrid refrigeration systems from Thermo King, a Trane Technologies brand, can switch between diesel and electric mode, allowing transporters to operate in inner cities, residential areas and low-emission zones with the unit’s diesel engine turned off.Greggs is one of the first customers in Europe to take delivery of the system.“We’re very conscious about the sustainability of our transport operations. It is paramount for us to operate in inner cities with as little noise and emissions as possible,” said Richard Penna, group logistics manager at Greggs.“It was a natural choice to work with Thermo King and equip our trucks with these new units that can easily switch from diesel operation to electric, reduce the sound level and eliminate emissions. On top of that we expect to benefit from the lower daily fuel consumption.”The new hybrid single- and multi-temperature solution for trucks feature Frigoblock alternator and inverter-drive technology. The nose-mount T-Series Hybrid and under-mount UT-Series Hybrid refrigeration automatically switches between electric and diesel operation as required or necessary.It added that the driver only needs to set the vehicle when leaving the depot and the system will switch electric and diesel modes during the working day depending on the unit’s requirements.The food-to-go and bakery specialist has used Thermo King units for several years, Penna added.“Thermo King Hybrid technology was designed to help transport and delivery companies’ future-proof their refrigerated operations and investments. With this solution they can stay ahead of regulations, control their total cost of ownership and achieve important sustainability goals,” added Colm O’Grady, product manager at Thermo King.last_img read more

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Plants with biosensors may light the way

first_imgPlants engineered with a specific biosensor can signal when they detect a molecule of interest, such as the human hormone progesterone or the drug digoxin, according to a team of researchers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute and Harvard Medical School (HMS).Synthetically engineered biosensors, which can be designed to detect and signal the presence of specific small-molecule compounds, have already unlocked potential applications, such as fuel, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. Until now, however, scientists have been challenged to leverage biosensors for use in eukaryotic cells, which comprise yeast, plants, and animals.Led by Wyss core member George Church, a team of researchers developed a new method for engineering a broad range of biosensors to detect and signal virtually any desired molecule using living eukaryotic cells. The team reported its findings in the journal eLife.“Biosensors that can tell you about their environment are extremely useful for a broad range of applications,” said Church, the Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics at HMS. “You can imagine if they were used in agricultural plants, they can tell you about the condition of the soil, the presence of toxins or pests that are bothering them.”To test their new method, the team experimentally engineered yeast, plant, and mammalian cells to contain customizable ligand-binding domains (LBDs), which are receptors for hormones and other types of small molecules. These LBDs are tailored so that they only bind and detect a specific molecule. A secondary “signal” component fused to the LBD can be programmed to emit fluorescence or regulate gene expression once it has bound to the target molecule. The components of this biosensor — the LBD in combination with the fluorescent or genetic signal — degrade and fade away if the target molecule is not identified.Strikingly, the team successfully engineered Arabidopsis plants to act as multicellular botanical biosensors, containing a custom LBD to recognize the drug digoxin and a luminescent signal protein to emit light when it is detected. These Arabidopsis biosensors fluoresced when the plants were exposed to digoxin, proving that whole organisms can actually light up to signal detection of an arbitrary molecule.“Like many eukaryotic organisms, plants are full of diverse hormones that make it challenging to sense and respond to a specific hormone of interest,” said Wyss Institute Technology Development Fellow Dan Mandell, the study’s co-first author. “But using our strategy, the Arabidopsis plants we engineered exhibited a 50-fold increase in luminescence in the presence of digoxin — very easily visualized — which could inspire exciting future applications involving trees or plants that detect harmful environmental pollutants or toxins and give off a visible indicator.”The team not only demonstrated its novel methodology in plants but also described its efficacy in turning yeast and mammalian cells into precise biosensors, which one day could be leveraged for use in industries that rely on the productivity of yeast or livestock, or for use as medical sensors. Overall, the method is extremely tunable and portable, meaning it can be used in a wide variety of organisms to detect a broad range of small molecules.An additional capability of the new biosensing method is its ability to connect to gene regulators instead of fluorescent proteins. Yeast, for example, could be engineered to produce a molecule from a renewable feedstock. From there, it could be programmed to self-identify the most efficient individuals within a population of producers so that only the most productive yeast would survive.In this way, a population of organisms leveraged for bioproduction of pharmaceuticals or other valuable molecules could quickly self-evolve to become extremely efficient and productive. The team used this strategy to evolve yeast that can produce the hormone progesterone with a much higher yield.The biosensors could have a direct impact on human health as well, as the team also used its method to tightly regulate the gene-editing mechanism CRISPR-Cas9 inside living human cells, a step toward preventing unintended changes to the genome during gene therapy.“These new reprogramming capabilities developed by the Church team open up an entirely new realm where ordinary organisms can be transformed into extraordinary living cellular devices that can sense specific signals and produce appropriate responses, whether it’s enhancing production of biofuels or secreting a therapeutic when the cells sense inflammation or infection. It’s another great enabling capability that will undoubtedly advance the entire field of synthetic biology,” said Wyss Institute Director Donald Ingber.This work was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Energy, the Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center, and the National Science Foundation.For a full list of the study’s authors, visit the Wyss website.last_img read more

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CVPS honored for storm response

first_imgThe Edison Electric Institute today honored Central Vermont Public Service with the association’s “Emergency Recovery Award” for outstanding power restoration efforts in the wake of a massive two-part weather event in February 2010. This is the third time CVPS has earned this honor.The award is presented annually to U.S. and foreign companies that face untoward circumstances caused by extraordinary events and put forth outstanding efforts to restore service to the public. Winners were chosen by a panel of judges following an international nomination process, and the awards were presented during EEI’s Spring CEO meetings.The “1-2 Punch Storm,” as it became known, was an unprecedented two-part snow and wind storm that knocked out service to hundreds of thousands of customers in the Northeast. Beginning on Feb. 23, 2010, the four-day weather event produced up to 4 feet of snow and winds approaching hurricane strength. CVPS, with a total of 159,000 customers, faced a record 104,872 outages over the course of the extended-duration event and mounted an extraordinary response. Nearly 67,000 individual customers were affected, some of whom lost service more than once.Either part of the storm event, in itself, would have ranked as one of the company’s 10 worst storms in history. Together, they affected 42 percent of CVPS customers, with as many as 27,000 customers without power at any one time. The duration of the weather event meant that even as crews worked to restore service in some areas, new outages occurred in others.”In many ways, the storm was a worst-case scenario envisioned in our storm preparedness training, yet we returned service quickly and safely,” said Joe Kraus, senior vice president for customer service, engineering and operations. “While we and our customers would love a break from the major storms that have repeatedly hammered our service territory in recent years, the award is testament to the commitment and hard work of our employees. They are among the industry’s elite.””When a storm hits, CVPS’s employees are second to none,” said Jeffrey Wimette, business manager for International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 300. “CVPS, its employees and the union share a deep concern for customers and have developed a true partnership on their behalf.”CVPS relied on private advance weather forecasts to alert the public to the pending storms and to strategically stage recovery crews, with assistance from utilities in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine and Ontario, Canada. All told, more than 600 tree cutters, line workers, schedulers and support staff were organized to repair the damage, logging 45,000 man-hours on the job.In addition, the company worked closely with news media to inform customers of its progress, repair estimates and safety issues. While there were no significant injuries, the storm provided a critical reminder of the importance of customer safety. CVPS created a new statewide advertising campaign following the event to ensure that clear, easy-to-understand safety information is available to all Vermonters.”Handling one storm well would have been a major feat – managing both safely and efficiently marks one of the greatest achievements in the company’s 81-year history and reflects the highest possible standard of customer service,” EEI President Tom Kuhn said. “It is a true pleasure to honor Central Vermont with this award.”CVPS also won the award following the 2007 “Nor’icane” that devastated Rutland County, and a second time after the 2008 ice storm that leveled much of the electric system in southern Vermont and elsewhere in New England.”These storms present us with incredible logistical challenges, but our employees have made huge sacrifices to overcome them,” CVPS Executive Chairman Bob Young said. “After 24 years at CVPS, I have never been more proud of our employees. It’s impossible to understand the depth of their commitment without spending time with them on the job, but it is nearly immeasurable.”Larry Reilly, who began work as CVPS’s ninth president on Tuesday, said the company’s reputation for service quality, customer care and reliability was one of the factors that drew him to the job. “Despite a very rural, rugged service territory, CVPS employees have a hard-earned reputation for excellence within the industry,” Reilly said. “That reputation is disproportionate to our relatively small size, and is a tribute to our 517 employees.” CVPS 3.2.2011last_img read more

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Working together to give credit unions a stronger voice

first_img 18SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Dean Young Dean Young leads PSCU’s strategic direction on how to best leverage the cooperative’s scale to advocate on behalf of the credit union industry. He works collaboratively with key … Web: pscu.com Details The credit union industry is a large group of people with a shared belief in the benefits of community and cooperation. And with that shared mission, all credit unions, affiliated state and federal associations, and the credit union service organizations (CUSOs) that serve them must work together to protect and advance the wellbeing of over 100 million credit union members. As the credit union movement grew, leaders offered their time and expertise to advocate for fair regulations and access to new technology. That support from leaders throughout the credit union landscape has helped push our cooperative mission to ever-greater levels of success.To further expand the voice of credit unions, CUSO senior executives participate on boards and advisory groups throughout the financial services industry, in disciplines including payment services, lending, risk management, insurance, investment services, business continuity and more. Cybersecurity and EMV, for example, are two areas in which credit unions benefit from a CUSO’s deep resources and partnerships. Through this participation, CUSOs can represent the credit unions they serve, keep them informed about the latest information and drive growth throughout the industry. This commitment ensures that their organizations and credit unions are positioned at the forefront of the financial services industry.While CUSOs like PSCU and others don’t employ lobbyists to advance the concerns of the credit unions they serve, they do maintain strong relationships with CUNA and NAFCU, which are responsible for lobbying the national government on behalf of the credit union industry. By participating on the advisory groups of official lobbying partners and bringing payments expertise, CUSOs can help insure that credit unions’ interests are well represented.The importance of maintaining a strong presence in credit union associations and advisory groups is more important than ever. That is why PSCU and other CUSOs have made it a priority to increase their participation throughout the credit union industry. One of the first steps they take to achieve this objective is to create the position of Senior Vice President of Industry Engagement, to lead their strategic direction to advocate on behalf of the credit union industry. These leaders work collaboratively with key national partners to ensure alignment on important topics. CUSOs support critical parts of a credit union’s operations and provide vital leadership for the industry.Since 1977, PSCU has been a key partner for hundreds of credit unions, enabling each to offer new services and grow their business. Along with all the services and technology credit unions receive from their membership, one of the biggest benefits is a much stronger voice on credit union topics. With the purchasing power of many credit unions behind them, CUSOs have a huge amount of influence with leading financial services partners.Industry engagement is an ongoing process for credit union organizations, not a short-term solution. Only by being continually engaged with all facets of the credit union industry can organizations effectively provide the appropriate guidance and collaborate on solutions that deliver an unparalleled member experience.last_img read more

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