News story: Foreign Secretary to visit Washington

first_imgForeign Secretary Boris Johnson will travel to Washington DC today (Sunday, 6 May) for 2 days of talks with the US Administration on Iran, North Korea, Syria, and other major international issues.While in Washington, the Foreign Secretary will meet Vice President Mike Pence and other senior Administration figures, including National Security Advisor John Bolton. He will also have the opportunity to discuss key issues with Congressional foreign policy leaders.Speaking ahead of his visit, Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said: Find out more about the UK-USA special relationship. Further information Media enquiriesFor journalistsEmail: [email protected]: 020 7008 3100 Follow the Foreign Secretary on Twitter @BorisJohnson and Facebook Follow the Foreign Office on Instagram, YouTube and LinkedIn On so many of the world’s foreign policy challenges the UK and US are in lockstep. We’ve seen this recently with the response to the poisonings in Salisbury, our strong response to Asad’s use of chemical weapons in Syria, and the effort to de-nuclearise North Korea. The UK, US, and European partners are also united in our effort to tackle the kind of Iranian behaviour that makes the Middle East region less secure – its cyber activities, its support for groups like Hezbollah, and its dangerous missile programme, which is arming Houthi militias in Yemen.last_img read more

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Collaboration aims to discover new immuno-oncology targets

first_imgHarvard, Merck to collaborate on research led by Harvard immunologist Arlene Sharpe, seeking to identify new pathways for the treatment of cancerHarvard University and Merck are launching a collaboration that will provide significant research funding for up to four years to support immuno-oncology research led by Arlene Sharpe, M.D., Ph.D., at Harvard Medical School (HMS). Sharpe, the George Fabyan Professor of Comparative Pathology and chair of the HMS Department of Immunology, will collaborate with researchers at Merck on a major project aiming to discover novel aspects of the immune system that may be targeted in future treatments for cancer.“This collaborative project aims to discover and validate novel regulators of immune responses,” said Sharpe. “Immunotherapies such as checkpoint inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of cancer, but my lab is deeply interested in understanding why some patients do not respond or develop resistance to those interventions. My hope is that by defining mechanisms that inhibit immune responses to tumors, we will identify very important druggable targets and new approaches to improve cancer immunotherapy.”The funding will support the work of scientists in the lab of Sharpe, who is a renowned leader in the field of tumor immunology. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine, and the recipient of numerous awards including the Warren Alpert Foundation Prize in 2017 for her contributions to the discovery of the PD-1 pathway.“Crucial insights into patient responses and outcomes may be gained through the study of fundamental biological mechanisms,” said Isaac Kohlberg, Harvard’s chief technology development officer and senior associate provost. “The complexity and promise of immuno-oncology presents a prime opportunity for Harvard’s top scientists to advance discovery through an academic-industry collaboration. Through this project, the Sharpe Lab is setting its sight on innovations that may contribute to dramatic improvements in patient care.”Under the agreement spearheaded by Harvard’s Office of Technology Development, Merck will have the option to negotiate an exclusive license to innovations arising from the research collaboration to develop these discoveries toward potential treatments for patients.“Collaboration with leading scientific groups is an integral part of Merck’s discovery strategy,” said Nick Haining, vice president for oncology discovery at Merck Research Laboratories. “We look forward to working with Sharpe’s team to investigate new ways to harness the immune system for therapeutic advances.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Indiana Grown celebrates upcoming anniversary at the Statehouse

first_imgIndianapolis, IN—Indiana Grown today celebrated its upcoming five year anniversary in the historic Statehouse with program members, partners, and legislators. During the celebration, the Indiana Grown team highlighted their major accomplishments and outlined key priorities for the year ahead. Attendees gathered to hear from Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch, who has been a longstanding supporter of Indiana Grown, along with ISDA Director Bruce Kettler and Indiana Grown Director Heather Tallman.“The Indiana Grown program is expanding daily and I commend the work done by our staff over these last five years to get this program to where it is today,” said Bruce Kettler, Indiana State Department of Agriculture Director. “Today’s event was a great opportunity for members to share their experiences with legislators, and I hope they both gained a greater knowledge of this outstanding program.”Recently, they received a grant to study the economic impact of buying local foods or products and to determine consumer and producer awareness. In 2020 Indiana Grown will open the nation’s first agriculture/airport partnership at the Indianapolis International Airport: Farmers’ Market featuring Indiana Grown.  “The hard work from our team and the resulting partnerships we have made over the years have propelled this program forward faster than we could have imagined,” said Heather Tallman Program Director. “We look forward to what 2020 brings to the table for Indiana Grown and our members.”Visit www.IndianaGrown.org to learn more about the program.last_img read more

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Shoah Foundation receives first endowed fellowship

first_imgDouglas Greenberg, the grant’s donor, served as the executive director of the Shoah Foundation for eight years until 2008. He was director during the institute’s move onto the USC campus. His wife Margee, a coordinator at the Office of Disability Services at Rutgers University, was a volunteer at the institute during her husband’s tenure.Greenberg said that the archives at the Shoah Foundation are so comprehensive and hold such value that emerging scholars in the field of genocide research should use them. Greenberg said that he and his wife had hoped that one day they could make a contribution to the institute.“We were happy to be in a position where we could do something and contribute to the institute,” Greenberg said. “We knew we wanted it to go towards scholarship and research, a place where we could make a difference.”A committee of researchers and professors at USC examined and interviewed several candidates for the Greenberg fellowship and selected McBride.McBride is a recent graduate of the history department at the University of California, Los Angeles. McBride focused his doctoral dissertation on the mass genocide of Nazi-occupied Volhynia, Ukraine. Next January, the fellowship will allow McBride to spend one week at the Shoah Foundation and use their extensive genocide video collection. He will also give a lecture on Jan. 15 on the USC campus about his research.“Any sort of funding or research to work with the Shoah collection is extremely important — it is a massive collection that should be more utilized,” McBride said.During his doctoral program, McBride served as an expert consultant on war crimes investigations for the United States Department of Justice. McBride will be a visiting assistant professor for the history department at Columbia University in 2015.McBride emphasized that the Shoah foundation’s archives are so extensive that young scholars who are working on genocide research can use them in conjunction with the resources that are being utilized in Europe.“It’s a huge honor to get to be the first person to be awarded this fellowship,” McBride said. “The fellowship gives me extra ability to take some time and integrate the testimony into my work.”The Greenberg fellowship is the first addition to the Center for Advanced Genocide Research. The Center, which was founded by filmmaker Steven Spielberg in April 2014, focuses on interdisciplinary studies organized to analyze genocide and systematic mass violence on an international scale.Shoah Foundation Coordinator of External Relations Rob Kuznia explained that the Visual History Archive of the institute, along with the extensive collection of primary sources at Doheny Memorial Library, will provide the research fellow with important sources to further his research.“The Center uniquely positions USC as being the only world-renowned private research institution with substantial original material from the Holocaust and other genocides,” Kuznia wrote in an email to the Daily Trojan. The Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Studies has named Jared McBride, Ph.D, the recipient of the Margee and Douglas Greenberg Research Fellowship.Proud benefactors · Margee and Douglas Greenberg, above, gave a gift to the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Studies to endow a fellowship in their name, which was awarded to Jared McBride, Ph.D. – Photo courtesy of the USC Shoah Foundationlast_img read more

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