Group examines, votes on internal issues

first_imgStudent body vice president Nidia Ruelas said student senate has done “very well” engaging in critical issues this year.“We’ve fostered together a climate of dialogue where people are talking with each other instead of to each other and when they’re engaging these issues, even if they disagree, even if they’re difficult issues,” she said. Senate’s biggest, most recent accomplishment was the passing of three resolutions regarding election reform in November, Ruelas said. The new regulations allow candidates more freedom when engaging with voters online and through social media platforms.  “That came out of a lot of dialogue, a lot of work and a lot of work was done outside of Senate,” Ruelas said. “But within Senate, the talk that was shared was very good and helpful.” Discussion and feedback on Onward, a forum for students to submit and vote on ideas, and the University’s Honor Code also had a “good input,” according to Ruelas.   “Some of the conversation regarding the academic integrity was also a huge success for Senate because they engaged the topic critically,” she said. Ruelas said senators have also done an excellent job of communicating between student government and their dorms, especially regarding the new sustainability initiatives in the dining halls. Senators are also “very active” in their departments. “For example, if they’re active through University Affairs, maybe they’re involved in things like the Huddle price scanner,” she said. With the recently released recommendations of the Core Curriculum Review Committee, Ruelas said discussing the recommended changes will be a main focus for next semester. “I think the intention is that this conversation goes out during the whole semester,” she said. Ruelas said academic integrity will be another focus as the “actual policies and recommendations are being thought up” from the University Code of Honor Committee. Diversity and inclusion will be another focus for senators to consider next semester, she said. “The other one that we want to stress is diversity and inclusion in many ways, not just racial or ethnic, but also socioeconomic. To some extent I think we’ve addressed those issues, but they’ll probably be the focus for next semester.”Ruelas says she hopes to incorporate other groups when working on issues of diversity and inclusion. “At the beginning of the year we had the diversity and inclusion training and another thing I think we can do is to foster a discussion related to the ‘It’s Time ND’ campaign that Diversity Council has led forward, so I think that things like that, bringing in speakers to talk, and maybe it would even take the form of a resolution too,” she said.Tags: Student government, student government in focus, student senatelast_img read more

Read More »

6 steps to build a world-class credit union

first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Building a framework for performance excellence—and ultimately a world-class credit union—involves taking six key steps, says Walter Jankowski, consultant/trainer at Reinvention LLC.Drivers of performance excellence, he says, “start with leadership, strategic planning, and a member focus.”Jankowski, speaking at CUNA Mutual Group’s recent Performance Excellence in Credit Unions Conference, cites these six steps for performance excellence:1. Clarify the strategySet your credit union’s direction with critical strategies and action plans, and check your progress along the way.last_img

Read More »

Maurizio Sarri reveals who is to blame for Chelsea collapse against Everton

first_imgEverton came away with the win (Picture: /Fantasista/Getty Images)Asked why they lost, he told Sky Sports: ‘I don’t know. The player don’t know what happened. At the moment I don’t really explain the change. We played in my opinion the best first half of the season. We could have scored four or five times. Suddenly we stopped to play. It’s very strange.‘We stopped to defend, to counter-attack, to everything. We had only to continue, I think. We were in control of the match. We played very well and needed to continue. at the beginning of the second half we didn’t play. It’s strange. I cannot understand.‘Tactically, if you don’t play, you don’t play. We changed the system but it was the same. It’s very difficult but I think the problem was mental. If you have a mental problem suddenly on the pitch, the system, the tactics is not enough.’‘No, it was not at all [that we lacked motivation], we started the match very well with big intensity and strong mentality, I don’t know what happened.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Advertisement Sarri was not happy (Picture: Getty Images)Maurizio Sarri absolved himself of blame for Chelsea’s defeat to Everton and instead pointed the finger at the players.The Blues appeared in complete control in the first half, missing a series of good chances, but were off the pace after the half-time break and were beaten 2-0 courtesy of goals from Gylfi Sigurdsson and Richarlison.It was a wasted opportunity for Sarri’s side to put pressure on their top-four rivals – all of whom who aren’t playing this weekend – but fell short once again, to leave them three points off Arsenal in fourth place.Their hopes of qualifying for next season’s Champions League took yet another blow but Sarri refused to take the blame for the disappointing defeat.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTInstead he questioned his players’ mentality and insists they would have lost regardless of what tactics he used. Maurizio Sarri reveals who is to blame for Chelsea collapse against Everton Metro Sport ReporterSunday 17 Mar 2019 7:09 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.3kSharescenter_img Advertisement Comment Sarri concerned with Chelsea mentality after Everton defeatTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 6:05FullscreenSarri concerned with Chelsea mentality after Everton defeathttps://metro.co.uk/video/sarri-concerned-chelsea-mentality-everton-defeat-1885108/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.last_img read more

Read More »

ELD standards for truckers, companies concern Indiana AG

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill is asking for a delay in rules regarding the mandatory use of Electronic Logging Devices. The devices make it easier and faster to accurately track, manage and share records of duty status. Hill says the implementation that is scheduled for December 18, 2017 would place undue burdens on drivers and operators.General Hill particularly took issue with the new requirements’ reliance on manufacturers to “self-certify” devices as complying with government standards – with no effective procedures seemingly yet developed to provide oversight over this process.Under the current plan drivers and operators have no way of determining which brands and models of devices will meet government standards.Still, Hill and his office continue to make sure drivers and companies know the new regulations.last_img read more

Read More »

COLUMN: USC is a fallen power

first_imgA lot can change in a decade, especially in sports. Ten years ago, an undefeated USC team came to South Bend as the undisputed preeminent program in all of college football. Notre Dame and its coach, Charlie Weis, wanted a victory so badly they resorted to a Belichickian  move of growing the grass to slow down USC’s dynamic athletes. Ultimately, USC prevailed in tremendous fashion with one of the most memorable plays in Trojan history, the Bush Push.The close loss to USC was lucrative for Weis, who used the 34-31 defeat to ink a contract extension that week. That was the power of USC 10 years ago. The Trojan program was so dominant and widely revered that even a close loss served as a signature victory of sorts. Not everyone may have liked USC, but everyone respected the Trojans. Opposing programs and fan bases got up for USC games. They were the biggest game of the season for every team who faced USC.Fast forward 10 years, and the state of the USC football program is almost diametrically opposed. I was in South Bend this weekend, and there was no extra emphasis from the Notre Dame fan base because they were playing a great team. Sure, the rivalry created an electric atmosphere, but it didn’t seem like anyone respected or was scared of this USC team.When Notre Dame won, it was just another victory over a mediocre team. It didn’t mean that much, which is a far cry from what beating USC used to represent. That is how you measure the strength of a football program: how excited opposing fan bases get when they beat you. By that metric, USC is a program in ruins, reduced to an ashen state by a pervasive combination of NCAA bias, poor administrative decisions and abysmal coaching.Beating USC now doesn’t mean anything because it happens so frequently. The Trojans lose everywhere and to everyone, and it’s both frustrating and dejecting as a fan.Of course the NCAA played a hand in this with its crippling sanctions. I hate that fraudulent and sham organization as much as anyone, but it isn’t completely responsible for what has happened to the USC program. The depleted roster and reduced recruiting classes that USC had weren’t conducive to a successful program, but USC still brought in enough talent to be in a better position than they are currently.Let’s not forget that the NCAA punishment might have been diminished or even partially mitigated had the Athletics Department decided to fight the sanctions. Instead, administrators meekly sat there and took it without any fight, much like the Trojans’ defense each week. Combine that with the questionable at best, and horrendous at worst, management of USC’s coaching situation, and a lot of the blame for USC’s current state falls squarely on the shoulders of the Athletics Department.Finally, the aforementioned coaching has been the key catalyst in the Trojan’s demise. Lane Kiffin seemed more interested in sparring with the media and breaking obscure statistical records than winning games. Forgetting about his off-the-field issues, Steve Sarkisian wasn’t exactly a world beater as head coach. He also seemed to care more about how the Trojans won than the simple act of winning. Poor coaching, an incompetent athletic administration and external variables created a confluence of factors that has ruined the USC brand.A lot can be written about the loss to Notre Dame. I personally thought Clay Helton did a solid job as coach, and if he wins more this season he should be given fair consideration for the job. The Trojans showed fight and played inspired football. Unfortunately, they also gave up two 90-yard drives in the fourth quarter and senior quarterback Cody Kessler continued his unfortunate trend of disappearing in big moments and big games. The lack of urgency with which he played in the final few minutes was disheartening.Those are micro issues however, symptoms of a program plagued by macro issues. The Trojans need a leader, a coach who can mold a team in his image and inspire players to compete and bring the Trojan program back. There are coaches out there who can do that — it’s about finding one and not settling for anything less.The USC program is in tatters. The Trojans are not nationally relevant for anything having to do with actual football —  instead they are a has-been. It’s been seven years since the team played in a Rose Bowl, 10 since they played in a national title. For a University with such immense resources and such fertile recruiting grounds that is unacceptable. Thankfully, the right coach can come in and reverse this trend immediately. With the talent laden roster the Trojans have, the right coach ensures that the next time the Trojans come into South Bend it will be the biggest game of the year for the Fighting Irish. That’s how it ought to be, and that is how it will be for every opposing team when USC finally gets a respectable leader.Jake Davidson is a junior majoring in accounting. His column, “Davidson’s Direction,” runs Mondays.last_img read more

Read More »

Thank You, Ellen, for the Paved Gbarnga-Ganta-Guinea Border Road!

first_imgUntil very recently, people traveling from Gbarnga to Ganta and on to the Guinea border had to endure deep potholes, dust and mud to reach their destinations.Our pick-up, taxi and truck drivers, not to speak of motorists, including government people and foreigner partners, driving through this region, attempted their trips with trepidation (fear, nervousness). It was not only the discomfort driving on the bad roads but the heavy toll they inflicted on the wear and tear of their vehicles. Market women, moreover, suffered serious losses when their perishable goods, especially bananas, fish, fruits, plantains and vegetables rotted during long delays due to mud and impassable potholes along the way.Not anymore, especially on the Gbarnga-Ganta-Guinea border route! Last week Monday President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf traveled to Ganta to dedicate the 70-kilometer paved road linking the Bong and Nimba capitals and the Guinea border.She was accompanied by Public Works Minister Gyude Moore; diplomats; development partners—especially the World Bank, European Union, Germany (KfW), Norway (NORAD) and United Kingdom; as well as legislators, including Senate Public Works Chairman Oscar Cooper of Margibi; County Superintendents; Chiefs and other local leaders.The opening of this paved road linking two counties and the neighboring Guinea border is an important milestone. Not only will it facilitate easier and more comfortable travel; it will also encourage trade and other economic activities. The Bong and Nimba people must now intensify their agricultural production. Remember what the President Sirleaf told you as she dedicated the road: This paved corridor and all other development accomplishments belong to you, for your cooperation and support helped bring them about. Agriculture Minister Moses Zinnah should seize this opportunity to reach out to the people in these two counties and ensure that they grow more tubers (cassava, eddoes, potatoes), fruits, plantains and vegetables, to feed their people and to supply the urban markets in Kakata, Harbel, Paynesville Red Light and Monrovia.We are here urging Agriculture Minister Zinnah to FOCUS on these areas and flood them with agricultural extension agents to convey the benefits ofresearch from the Central Agricultural Research Institute (CARI). This road must NOT be a corridor for more accidents, with reckless drivers misusing the pavement with excessive speeding, injuring and killing people. See what happened last week to our young Public Works Minister Gyude Moore, who was knocked down by a wicked, speeding hit-and-run driver as he jogged along Payne Avenue, Monrovia—why? Only because unlike past years when Payne Avenue and all other thoroughfares were riddled with potholes so that vehicles could not move fast, today, because most roads are paved, motorists drive recklessly. We pray that our youthful Minister has been restored to perfect health.Motorists using the new Gbarnga-Ganta-Guinea highway should make a conscious effort to drive safely, carefully and responsibly on this paved new road. That is the best “Thank you” they can give to the President.We call on the Liberia Electricity Corporation (LEC) to install lights along this and all other highways to ensure night safety; and on the Liberia National Police (LNP) to install signs indicating curves, bridges, hills and other danger points along that route. We insist that this new thoroughfare should be an opportunity to boost agricultural production in Bong and Nimba. This road must NOT be used to import farm produce from Guinea and La Cote d’Ivoire! Bong, Nimba farmers, grow your own bitter ball, cabbage, lettuce, pepper, tomatoes and other produce, for you can no longer use “bad roads” as an excuse for failure to be hardworking and productive.We further call on the Liberia Business Association (LIBA) and the Liberia Marketing Association (LMA) to tour the area and encourage Bong, Nimba and other entrepreneurs to open businesses along this new, welcoming corridor—agro-industry enterprises, such as poultry and meat processing plants; building materials stores; food centers; hotels, motels, shopping centers, etc. Who amongst us can forget that this government has been severely criticized by the people for the lack of enough development initiatives? At this point, we are compelled to say to Liberians: “Thank God for mercies—great and small.” Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More »