Deportation Raids Split Many Cities, States

first_imgDeportation Raids Split Many Cities, StatesSTATELINE By Teresa WiltzCarmen was sleeping when they came for her and her two children. It was early Saturday morning, Jan. 2, and about a dozen federal immigration officials banged on her parents’ door in Atlanta. The 27-year-old single mother from El Salvador said she had just enough time to throw on some clothes over her pajamas.Carmen, who illegally crossed the Mexico-Texas border with her children in June 2014, was shocked when the officials said they were deporting her right away. She was in the midst of an appeals process — and even had a court appointment for that Monday — in a bid to stay.“I asked them, ‘Why are you sending me back to my country where it’s so dangerous? I could be killed,’ ” she said from a detention center in Dilley, Texas, where she is being held with her children, ages 6 and 8. (She asked that her real name not be used for fear of compromising her case.)The mother and her two children are among 121 people — mostly women and children from Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico — who were rounded up early this month, in raids primarily in Georgia, North Carolina and Texas amid growing fears that the U.S. faces a surge of illegal unaccompanied minors fleeing violence in Central America comparable to 2014. So far 77 have been deported.The deportation raids have sparked fear in U.S. immigrant communities and highlight the wide confusion and political division among federal, state and local authorities on how the nation should deal with as many as 11 million undocumented immigrants, most of whom entered the country illegally across the southern border.The Democratic mayors of Philadelphia and New Haven, Connecticut, last week said they would not cooperate with the deportation efforts. The Democratic New York City Council announced that city agencies would not report undocumented people to federal authorities.In Maryland, the Democratic executive in Montgomery County said local police wouldn’t cooperate in any raids. And Prince George’s County urged federal officials not to round up children in schools or people in stores, social service agencies or county buildings.Meanwhile, in Texas, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott last month extended the 18-month mission of National Guard troops along the border in response to a rise in the number of unaccompanied minors crossing the Rio Bravo.And the U.S. Supreme Court said Tuesday it will hear a case involving President Barack Obama’s 2014 order that would have provided protection to as many as 4.9 million undocumented immigrants — an order that has been stayed while a lawsuit works its way through the courts.Texas and 25 other mostly Republican states filed the suit against the order, while dozens of mostly Democratic cities, the National League of Cities and the U.S. Conference of Mayors have backed the order in court briefs.At the same time U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents are carrying out the raids, the Obama administration is building temporary shelters to house unaccompanied immigrant children in Colorado, Florida and New Mexico.The shelters will house up to 2,200 children for on average 32 days each and will provide schooling for them until they are placed with sponsor families. Under federal law, unaccompanied children must be transferred out of detention centers within 72 hours.The federal government “doesn’t want to get caught the way they did in 2014,” said Marc Rosenblum, who is leaving his position at the Migration Policy Institute to become deputy assistant secretary of Homeland Security and director of the Office of Immigration Statistics. “They want to give relief to people who have valid claims while enforcing their borders.”Either way, he said, it’s a dilemma with no easy solutions. “It’s a tough policy problem.”Targeted RaidsTargeted RaidsWhite House spokesman Josh Earnest said the raids begun last month are intended as deterrence, by discouraging people from attempting “the dangerous journey from Central America to the southwest border.”They have targeted families who had illegally crossed the border after May 1, 2014, and who had exhausted their legal options for staying, ICE said. The families will be held in detention centers for processing and then flown back to their home countries.But some defiant local officials say the raids have created a public safety crisis. Parents, they say, are keeping their children home from school and skipping doctor’s appointments. Whole families, they say, are hiding out in their homes, too frightened to go to the grocery store — or to talk to the police.“This is having a severe impact on the immigrant community itself,” said Maryland state Del. Ana Sol-Gutiérrez, a Democrat. “They are very much afraid of what ICE raids can do to their families. The community is panicked.”In announcing local police wouldn’t cooperate in the deportation effort, Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett said, “We want all of our community members to know that they are free to go about their daily life, to go to schools and work, social service agencies, hospitals and medical clinics.“If you have reason to need help from our police, do not be afraid to call on them.”The SurgeThe raids come amid a rise in illegal crossings at the border, where last fall thousands of families and unaccompanied children fleeing gang violence, drought and poverty in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, slipped under the fence.The rise — more than 17,000 between October and December, compared to nearly 8,000 during the same period the previous year — has stoked fears that the nation will experience a surge like the one it witnessed in 2014, when roughly 69,000 children swarmed the border, creating a crisis in U.S. detention facilities and overwhelming states and municipalities.“Right now, we’re on pace to have more families and unaccompanied minors arrive in fiscal year 2016 than in 2014,” Rosenblum said.Once they cross, they end up in every state. How they are treated can depend on which one they go to.California, Florida, New York, Texas and the Washington, D.C., region that includes Maryland and Virginia have the largest numbers of unaccompanied children.California threw open its doors. In 2014, Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat, signed into law a bill allocating $3 million in legal aid for Central American children. That same year, then-Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley, a Democrat, sought to house the children in foster homes rather than in group shelters and pushed to have them treated as refugees.But other states made it clear the children were not welcome. Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, a Republican, said in 2014 he did not want the children sent to his state because it would encourage others to cross the border illegally. Meanwhile, then-Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman, a Republican, protested that the federal government had sent 200 children to his state without consulting him.Today, the raids are happening in cities and states that have some of the toughest immigration courts, said Amy Fischer, policy director for RAICES, a Texas-based organization that is providing pro bono legal aid to immigrants in the deportation centers.For example, she said, “very, very few people get granted asylum in Atlanta.”Other regions, such as the Washington, D.C., area, have courts that tend to be more immigrant-friendly, Fischer said. It’s also easier for immigrants there to find a lawyer, she said.U.S. Justice Department statistics back that up. In Atlanta, only 1 percent of asylum requests were granted in 2014, compared to 71 percent in Arlington, Virginia, and 84 percent in New York City.Escalating ViolenceAs Carmen found out, Atlanta wasn’t the best place to arrive undocumented, after fleeing her home and job as a cosmetologist in El Salvador in the face of gang violence in the summer of 2014.She was apprehended at the Texas border, where she applied for asylum and was ordered to wear an ankle bracelet to track her whereabouts. From there, she went to Atlanta, to be with her parents and brothers and sisters. She said she never missed a court appearance. But in October, a judge ordered her deported.Carmen was awaiting a decision on her appeal when ICE knocked on her door and hauled her off. Now, she said, she is working with her pro bono lawyers and praying for good news. “I hope God lets me stay,” she said. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Thought leadership: New BIN utilization requirements

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr It was back in 1999 that many articles were written predicting that the United States would run out of phone numbers, driven by the then fresh surge of cell phones, fax machines, and virtual numbers.  The solution at the time was area code splits and overlays, but neither was very popular. And, it wasn’t that we were really running out of individual numbers.  After all, 10 digits yields some 10 billion unique combinations. Even allowing for reserved combinations (411, 911, 555, etc.) there’s still plenty of combinations. Today, there are about 900 million active phone lines. A phone company would request an NPA-NXX, which equated to the block of 10,000 numbers following the first 6 (e.g. 813-984-0001 to 9999). But so many new VOIP, cable, skype-like companies were requesting blocks that the country was running out of blocks to give out. The solution was number portability. Any number could move to any service provider (fixed, wireless, VOIP, virtual).Are we running out of credit card numbers?Fast forward to 2016, and there are predictions that we will run out of credit card numbers. However, just like phone numbers, it’s not the case where we are exhausting every single combination of the standard 16 digit number found on every credit, debit, prepaid, card and some gift cards, airline cards and gas cards. That would be 1 quadrillion unique numbers worldwide (the 16th digit is a checksum). continue reading »last_img read more

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MSOC : Freshmen defenders Thomas and Murrell bring chemistry developed in Canada to SU

first_img Published on September 14, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @chris_iseman Skylar Thomas received a rude introduction to college soccer. In his first start for Syracuse, the freshman was overwhelmed by the speed and strength of Colgate’s players.Compared to high school, it was a different game.The only form of familiarity Thomas found was in Jordan Murrell, a fellow freshman defender and his teammate on the Canadian national U-18 team. And Murrell’s presence on the field helped calm Thomas’ nerves.‘I was actually really nervous. I wasn’t used to the college game, I guess. I didn’t know what to expect,’ Thomas said. ‘It was a little sense of relief but I’m pretty sure he was as nervous as me, probably.’Thomas and Murrell have known each other almost six years, having played against each other in club soccer matches in Canada and then together on the national U-18 team earlier this year. Both have earned starting spots in their freshmen seasons at Syracuse, a goal they set together and pushed each other to accomplish.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Canadian teammates have been in the starting lineup for all of the Orange’s (2-2) four games to this point. They’ll get their first taste of a big game for Syracuse this weekend when the team plays Cal Poly (2-1-2) and No. 16 New Mexico (4-0-1) at the University of Akron Tournament.Both are still getting accustomed to this level of play, but playing against tougher competition before SU opens its Big East schedule is something head coach Ian McIntyre hopes will benefit the young defenders.‘I think Jordan and Skylar have started very well. This will also be another big test for them,’ McIntyre said. ‘… But they’re learning a lot on the job. It’s been a good start to their Syracuse careers.’The good start has been a product of the chemistry they had already established playing together in Canada. They’re friends off the field, and Thomas said having someone making the same transition to the college game helps ease the growing pains that come with it.Thomas showed his inexperience on Sunday in SU’s 2-1 overtime win over American. His mental lapse late in the game on a play in the box led to the Eagles scoring their lone goal. He said he’s still working on staying focused for all 90 minutes.But focus is one of the few parts of his game that needs improvement.During a tournament with the national team earlier this year, Thomas didn’t play much for the first half of Canada’s schedule. But when Thomas finally saw time, Murrell said he noticed a change in Canada’s defensive unit for the better.‘He came on, he made a very big impact, he held his own,’ Murrell said. ‘And after that, the whole camp, he started every game.’During their time with the Canadian team, they had no idea they’d ever be teammates at Syracuse and never discussed the possibility.But when SU assistant coach Mike Miller told Thomas he was recruiting a player named Jordan from the Toronto FC Academy, Thomas immediately knew Miller was talking about Murrell. Soon after, Thomas went on Facebook and contacted Murrell, who told him he was indeed going to play for the Orange.The teammates developed a relationship playing together for Canada. The more they played on the same field, the better they got at communicating with each other.And that level of communication has carried into their first four games for SU as starting center backs.When Thomas yells ‘watch your shoulder’ to Murrell during games, Murrell knows exactly what he’s talking about and which shoulder he needs to watch.‘When we have to mark a defender, and we both step, and we’re both talking and we’re both encouraging each other during the game,’ Murrell said. ‘We just communicate very well. Even off the pitch, we’re always hanging out and talking.’When they got to Syracuse, Thomas and Murrell talked about their individual goals for the season. Both wanted to start even though they didn’t expect to. Still, they challenged each other to work hard during the preseason to achieve their shared goal.It paid off as they outplayed their competition on the Orange defense and McIntyre made them starters.‘We made it our goal to start,’ Thomas said. ‘We put as much effort toward it as we could. We made it, I guess.’After four games, the transition has gotten easier. It’s still the same game Thomas and Murrell were playing in Canada. But when times get tough again, Thomas knows he can turn to Murrell.‘It’s good I have someone to talk to,’ Thomas said. ‘I know him as a player and as a friend, so we’re able to build on that relationship and go further.’[email protected] Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Los Angeles Lakers enter 2014-15 season with health concerns

first_img“You just got to read each situation, read each situation as it comes, each game is going to be different,” Bryant said. “I’m sure there will be games where I have to do more and games where I have to do less.”Bryant stressed more about the Lakers’ defense, which ranked 27th out of 30 NBA teams in points allowed (104.2 points). But in the last two preseason games, the Lakers held teams to an average of 89 points.“I’m very happy with the way the preseason went because I thought each game we got better,” Scott said. “We’re understanding what we need to do and we’ll keep working at it.” The Lakers fielded eight players that missed a combined 34 preseason games, sparking back memories of last season’s nightmare that entailed 12 players sitting out for a combined 319 contests because of injuries. In related news, the Lakers finished with a 27-55 record that marked their worst season in L.A. franchise history. The Lakers declared 40-year-old point guard Steve Nash out for the season after having prolonged pain in his back that kept limited him only to a combined 65 games the past two years. Nick Young (right thumb), Xavier Henry (right knee) and Ryan Kelly (right hamstring) sat for all of the preseason. The Lakers are also evaluating injuries to veteran point guard Ronnie Price (right knee) and training camp invitee Wayne Ellington (concussion) that happened in the preseason finale against Sacramento on Friday in Las Vegas. The injuries could complicate how the Lakers manage their roster, which was dwindled to 15 on Saturday after waiving training camp invitees Jabari Brown and Roscoe Smith. The Lakers may keep Ellington since he would receive a full salary if he were cut while being injured. Price also will likely stay, especially with Nash’s absence. But the Lakers would need to create a roster vacancy should they use the disabled players exception, which would allow them either to sign a free agent or trade for a player for $4.85 million.At least nothing has happened to Bryant, who played in only six games last season because of injuries to his left Achilles tendon and left knee. He averaged 19 points on 38.47 percent shooting and four assists in 26.7 minutes.How much of the workload will Bryant have to carry? Through eight exhibition games and four starting lineup combinations, a few themes regarding the Lakers’ 2014 preseason emerged.Kobe Bryant looked sharp with both his health and post play. Most of the Lakers’ remaining roster struggled staying healthy. Rookie Julius Randle appeared promising. Guard Jeremy Lin seemed exciting. Uncertainty persists on whether the “steady improvement” Coach Byron Scott noted the Lakers made on defense will become a trend.So with the Lakers ending a 3-5 exhibition season, what marks the primary concern heading into their season opener on Tuesday against the Houston Rockets at Staples Center?“Injuries, that’s the main concern,” Scott said. “Hopefully most of our guys are healthy by Tuesday.” center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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Garon Park wins GolfMark Club of the Year 2013

first_img8 Feb 2013 Garon Park wins GolfMark Club of the Year 2013 Garon Park Golf Club in Essex has completed a remarkable revival by winning the prestigious title of GolfMark Club of the Year 2013, supported by COBRA-PUMA GOLF. It’s a triumph for co-owner Alan Walker, who bought the club from the administrators in May 2010, and for his team. “We are absolutely chuffed, this is a wonderful achievement for a club which was in the doldrums three years ago. “This will boost morale at the club and tell everybody that we are something special,” said Alan, a past captain of the PGA and a PGA Master Professional. He was accompanied at the awards dinner by PGA professional Ben Jones and the club’s junior organisers Micky and Carol Pearson. They have all played key roles in the success of the 27-hole complex, which is now a thriving centre offering opportunities for all. This England Golf award, which is now in its fifth year, recognises golf clubs that make an outstanding and innovative contribution to junior and beginner golf, showing a willingness to improve and develop.   The award was announced at the England Golf Partnership’s County Golf Development Conference at Holywell Park Conference Centre at Loughborough University.  The conference also applauded the two runners-up, Upton by Chester Golf Club in Cheshire and Leamington & County Golf Club in Warwickshire. Alan Walker told the audience how the GolfMark experience – which led to Garon Park receiving a High Achiever award – had been the foundation of the club’s success story.  “Opportunities arose and we decided to take them,” he said. Mr Walker’s connections with Garon Park go back to 1994, when he designed the course and ran the club for five years, before selling it. He jointly bought it back after hearing it had gone into administration and decided the way forward was to “get to the backbone of the game, junior golfers.” In 2010 there were just five juniors, today the club has 115, encouraged by the “passion and commitment” of Micky and Carol Pearson, and enjoying protected fees and a range of coaching and teaching programmes, offered by Ben Jones and his team of professional coaches for the junior section. Next the club turned its attention to beginner golf and set a target of bringing 100 novices into the game last year. They exceeded that by 50 players and have set themselves a target of 250 new beginners this year. “Through the ‘Get into golf’ programme and our own version of ‘Get further into golf’ and ‘Get into playing golf’, we have made our market,” said Alan. The club works closely with Essex County Golf Partnership and is committed to growing the game and their business. The secret, says Alan, is: “Doing the basics and seeing them through. We are passionate about people and we make them feel very, very welcome.” Presenting the award, Craig Verrinder, UK Marketing Manager for COBRA PUMA GOLF, said: “We are delighted to be able to recognise Garon Park for their outstanding efforts in providing a golf facility that truly supports the development of the game. “Golf is changing and the ability to offer venues that are inclusive and fun for golfers of all abilities is key to enhancing golf participation within the community.   “COBRA PUMA GOLF are proud to continue supporting the GolfMark programme and helping golf grow across the UK.” England Golf is delighted that COBRA-PUMA GOLF support the GolfMark award scheme and provide prizes for the Club of the Year award and quarterly and annual prize draws. Richard Flint, Golf Development Manager for England Golf, commented “It is great to see the success that GolfMark clubs can have, particularly in these challenging times. Garon Park has adapted, become more business and customer focused and with their flexible, welcoming approach have become a truly inclusive facility”. “The golfing landscape has changed and it is important that golf clubs monitor and react accordingly.  England Golf continues to invest in resources, such as GolfMark and their County Golf Partnership network, to ensure golf clubs can benefit to maximum effect.” Contenders for the 2013 award were nominated by their County Golf Partnerships and a shortlist was drawn up by a panel of England Golf Partnership (EGP) representatives. Individual visits were made to the final three clubs to determine the winner. Any affiliated golf club can apply to work through the GolfMark process and achieve the accreditation, by visiting www.golfmark.org  There are currently 620 golf clubs with GolfMark and a further 545 working towards accreditation.  England Golf is currently reviewing the GolfMark initiative to support and recognise golf clubs in both business and development.  It is expected that GolfMark will be re-launched in late 2013. GolfMark is an EGP initiative which is part of its ‘Whole Sport Plan’ for golf and an integral part of its vision to ‘Grow the Game’. Caption: (from left) Alan Walker, Craig Verrinder, Carol and Micky Pearson, and Ben Jones.last_img read more

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