A bold pathway in life — and biology

first_imgAnthony Covarrubias grew up in a working-class neighborhood in South Los Angeles. While celebrities in sports cars whizzed to the beach just a few miles away, Covarrubias’ neighbors waited in long lines at the local health clinic for low-quality care they couldn’t afford. Although his parents worked hard to make ends meet, access to health care and health benefits was not always available. Acutely aware of this disparity from a young age, Covarrubias decided to get an education and help correct the injustice.For this Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health doctoral student, now in his final year in the Biological Sciences program, the quest to cure metabolic diseases is personal. He’s seen family members and neighbors suffer from diabetes and recently learned of a graduate from his high school who died young from atherosclerosis. Finding a cure for conditions that disproportionately shorten the lives of the poor and people of color won’t be easy, but Covarrubias is in it for the long haul.“Science teaches you to be patient and persevere,” he says. “Sometimes experiments don’t work out. Sometimes we give it our best effort and it’s still not enough. But that’s what I have signed up for.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Sister interprets the ‘good’

first_imgSister Joan Chittister, a Benedictine sister and author of 45 books, discussed the common good during the annual Fr. Bernie Clarke Lecture on Catholic Social Tradition on Monday night in the Hesburgh Library auditorium. “Tonight I want to spend a little time sorting out … the whole concept of ‘the common good,’” she said. Chittister said celebrating the 50th anniversary of the encyclical “Pacem en Terris” brings people to the very heart of what it means not only to be a Christian or a Catholic, but also to be a citizen of the United States.”In every single presidential election cycle, we enter as a people into the centrifuge of one of the oldest debates and at the same time one of the most pressing contemporary questions in the life of this country,” she said. “That question is what exactly as a people are we about? Is such a think as the common good even possible in a world such as ours?” Chittister said in “Pacem in Terris”, Pope John XIII does not talk about peace in terms of war or weapons of mass destruction, but in terms of the common good. “In 176 paragraphs of that encyclical, he talks 48 times about the common good,” she said. “Without the common good, there will never be peace and certainly no justice.” Chittister said the issue of the common good even divided Alexis de Tocqueville and James Madison on the question of what the common good is and how to obtain it. “[The common good] riveted the Founding Fathers 200 years ago and it clearly confuses this session of Congress,” she said. “It has plagued political philosophers and economists across centuries and it continues to do so to this very day.” The common good is the holy grail of politics, Chittister said. “The common good is a vision of public virtue, which engages the individual citizen, energizes the government, shapes the public system and points the public direction and all it’s policies, all it’s institutions and all it’s legislative intents,” Chittister said. “The common good is the answer to the question, what, that we all want for this country … what is it that we really want for this country and how do we go about getting it.” Chittister said now the discourse in the U.S. is more inclined to talk about the general good instead of the common good. “We talk about the public good, meaning natural gifts that benefit us all equally, like air, water and good order if of course we have the good fortune to find air that is pure, water that is clean and land that is toxin free, resources that are sufficient to afford anywhere,” she said. There is no doubt the common good is an endangered species, Chittister said. Chittister said the world is changing through globalization with more diversity present in religion, nations and neighborhoods. What once divided people – language, geography – no longer do so, she said. “‘Pacem in Terris’ gets clearer everyday,” she said. “The fact that one is a citizen of a particular state does not detract from anyway from his of her membership in the human family as a whole or from their citizenship in the world community.” Contact Anna Boarini at [email protected]last_img read more

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Strategic questions to ask at this year’s planning session

first_imgQuestions and answers. They are a key part to developing any strategy. Ask the wrong strategic questions and it doesn’t matter what your answer is. Answer the right questions the wrong way and it doesn’t matter what the question is.With On the Mark Strategies’ planning process, we conduct a pre-session survey of attendees. This gets everyone thinking and saves time during the meeting. This year more than ever, the questions you ask are critical.Asking the same “canned” questions year after year is also not a wise idea. As you prepare your Post Pandemic Plan you must look beyond the current crisis.So what are the best strategic questions to ask this year? Here are a few ideas along with why they are critical: ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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New Euro ruling scuppers UK regeneration plans

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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MLB Network’s film on 1995 Mariners a reminder of bygone era when attendance was king

first_imgMORE: Watch ‘ChangeUp,’ a new MLB live whiparound show on DAZNIn a previous era, that would have been a much bigger problem for owners.Take Seattle, for example, which regularly ranked bottom-five in attendance in the late-’80s and early ’90s, just before modern revenue supplies kicked into gear. As the MLB Network film “The 1995 Mariners, Saving Baseball in Seattle” explores, the Mariners faced relocation until they attracted rabid stadium support (and subsequent funding for a new park) via a dramatic 1995 playoff run.“Baseball was gone (before that),” said former infielder Harold Reynolds, who played in Seattle from 1983 to 1992.His Mariners were the penultimate case of lackluster attendance being the main driver of monetary uncertainty. After Seattle’s near-exit, the Expos left Montreal for D.C. after cost-cutting ownership and a subpar stadium experience torpedoed fan support.The modern Rays, of course, have remained in jeopardy of relocation in part because of their dismal gate counts. But declining attendance hasn’t stopped their valuation from tripling since 2009, according to Forbes.The feeling for players competing in front of empty seats is different, too.“We weren’t on TV much,” Reynolds said. “If people didn’t come to the game, they didn’t see you. Now, even if there’s not a fan in the stands … we still all (see) the game.“It’s important that fans go to games, don’t get me wrong, but I do think it was different back then. If we didn’t have attendance, people didn’t follow the club.”The downside of attendance being deemphasized, however, is lessened incentive for front-offices to field competitive teams, and by extension, minimized personal connection between players and fans at the ballpark.Those aforementioned Rays have artificially limited ticket growth through seat capacity reduction — Tropicana Field’s reduced capacity of 25,000 would not have been able to hold eight of the 10 home crowds that arrived in September 2008 or six of the 10 in September 2010, let alone any of the playoff games the Rays have hosted. Even as MLB’s attendance numbers plummet in 2019, continuing an in-person decline not just in baseball but across many major U.S. sports, teams are not necessarily being thrust into peril.Other emergent cash sources such as hefty local TV deals, video streaming agreements and revenue sharing for small markets have helped ease strain on attendance-starved franchises. There are a lot of those organizations these days: Eight teams are currently drawing fewer than 20,000 fans per game, compared with just three teams a decade ago. They could win 25 straight games and not match the all-encompasing importance of what the Mariners pulled off to save their team in 1995. So too could a number of other attendance bottom-dwellers such as the A’s, Orioles and Marlins. It’s no longer just about who shows up in person.As a result, then, the raw emotions on display in “The 1995 Mariners, Saving Baseball in Seattle,” which debuts this Sunday, indicate something may be lost in baseball’s evolved priorities.“To see that connection with the fans was really special,” Reynolds said. “(Mariners outfielder) Jay Buhner crying at the end of the movie tells you all you need to know. It tells you all you need to know about what that meant to everybody.”last_img read more

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Slippery Rock’s Andre Freeman ready to ‘D’ up in NFL

first_imgANDRE FREEMAN When Andre Freeman stood up and walked towards me I knew it. And you would know it too. This guy is special. First the million dollar smile hits you and then see what the NFL clearly sees. the 6’0 190 pound 22 year old defensive cornerback from Slipper Rock University has all the tools needed to make his mark on the NFL. And Andre didn’t gain the size or the skills by accident. Mr. Freeman Sr. was set to make his mark on Sundays with the Buffalo Bills back in 1986 when life took him in another direction including a fabulous family.Further evidence of great things to come came when “Elite Sports and Entertainment Management Co.,” owned and operated by Five Starr Corporation introduced the All-Conference grad to Sports Entertainment Management Group LLC operated by partners Eddie Edwards Jr. and Dwayne Woodruff (former two time Steelers Super Bowl Champion and All-Pro Cornerback).Numerous NFL scouts think that Freeman is the real deal and ironically the Buffalo Bills are showing strong interest in him.Freeman, who just returned from playing in the Hansen Bowl in Virginia Beach, has no doubt he can play at the next level and only needs to pack on another 10 pounds of muscle and drop his 40 yard dash down from a 4-4 to a 4-3 and he’s set to go.Based on all “The Rock” has told me about Andre coupled with his near perfect attitude and work ethic, I said he can’t miss on the gridiron but just in case he graduates with a degree in Safety Management. Not to mention the fact that you know how we Rock Grads roll. You got Ron Hunt, Jeff Lake, Chuck Sanders, “Flyin Myron” Brown and yours truly to clearly show you that failure is not a option.last_img read more

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Black Friday Football Rivalry Bigger Than The Game

first_imgBy Chris Rotolo |Thanksgiving may be about friends, family and feasting.But for those in the Two River area who like to get out and throw around a football, the day after Thanksgiving is all about “the Rivalry.”For the past six years, the Rivalry Series flag football knockout tournament has pitted town against town in a good-natured Black Friday competition that also raises serious money for Lunch Break of Red Bank.This year, the 2018 edition will include an even larger field of participants. Joining Little Silver, Shrewsbury, Fair Haven and Rumson will be squads from Middletown, Monmouth Beach, Oceanport and Red Bank.“The past couple of years we’ve started to include more and more people from different communities and the word continues to spread, and the interest grows,” said Rivalry Series organizer Rick Brandt of Little Silver.The games will kick off Friday, Nov. 23 at Count Basie Field in Red Bank and run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Children from different towns will play each other at grade level. There is also a division for women and another for men 18-34 and over 35.The first games will pit Little Silver against Shrewsbury, Red Bank against Middletown, Rumson against Fair Haven and Oceanport against Monmouth Beach.In the beginning, it was just a group of Little Silver friends who took to the turf for some post-holiday pickup football. The opposing team was from neighboring Shrewsbury.“When we first started playing as 12-year-olds back in 2002, I’m not sure we ever thought it would get to this point,” Brandt said. “Bragging rights were all we were worried about back then. But it’s come a long way.”Brandt learned early on about Little Silver’s deeply embedded, but friendly, rivalry with Shrewsbury.“When you’re growing up in those towns, the rivalry is seen and felt everywhere,” Brandt said. “It’s in your recreational sports. It’s in the schools. It’s everywhere you look.”“The funny thing about it is, you play against those guys for so long in so many different organized sports and pickup games that you actually start to like them,” Brandt said with a laugh. “Then you get to high school and your sharing classes with them and you can’t figure out why you were ever rivals in the first place.”Brandt said as the friendships grew, so did the traditional game itself. In their high school years, friends and family began attending, some to tailgate, other to mingle, and all to lend voice to their respective cheering sections.In college, though the distance between them increased, it was the game that helped maintain the bond between the friends. And each year the audience continued to grow.In 2013, Athlete’s Alley of Shrewsbury starting equipping players with personalized team jerseys, giving the day its own uniform. Inspired by the all the participation, Brandt formed a partnership with Lunch Break and over the next two years raised nearly $2,000 for the organization though small donations from those who played in and attended the game.“It was a nice start, but I thought we could do more,” said Brandt.Between 2015 and 2017 the series’ organizers pledged $10,000 donations to Lunch Break and hit their mark each time.In 2016, the traditional game was expanded, offering games for men, women and children from Little Silver and Shrewsbury.Last year, players who participated in the RIvalry Series raised $10,000 for Lunch Break of Red Bank. Photo courtesy Rick BrandtThis year donations are pouring in and Brandt expects the Rivalry Series will have raised $50,000 for Lunch Break by week’s end.One day, Brandt, working with his brother Rob Brandt, would like to see Rivalry Series expand even more and include teams from every part of Monmouth County.“We’re calling it the Rivalry Series, and we did that on purpose, because I’m not sure I want to limit this to just football,” Brandt said.“Down the line, I have no doubt that we can run basketball and softball events and have them be successful. There are so many different sporting events we can launch and then you’re really talking about a lot of money being raised and a lot of good being done in our community.”Rivalry Series Schedule of EventsFriday, Nov. 23The GamesBoys & Girls (3rd & 4th grade), 9 a.m.Boys & Girls (5th & 6th grade), 9 a.m.Boys & Girls (7th & 8th grade), 9 a.m.Men 35 & older, 11 a.m.Women 18 & older, 1 p.m.Men 18-34 years old, 3 p.m.After PartyVal’s in Rumson, 7-10 p.m.For more information or to register for competition visit therivalryseries.com.This article was first published in the Nov. 22-27, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Leafs, Nitehawks post shutouts in Murdoch Division action on opening night of KIJHL

first_imgWow! What a difference a week makes.Andrew Walton turned away 27 shots to power the Nelson Leafs to a 3-0 victory over the defending Kootenay Conference Champion, Castlegar Rebels, in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action Friday night at the Community Complex in the Sunflower City.The win gained the Green and White a little revenge after the Murdoch Division rivals pummeled Nelson by a total score of 14-5 in two exhibition games.The story of the game was the play of Walton, who started last season in Castlegar before being traded to Fernie midway through the campaign.Walton made 12 saves in the first period and 11 in the second before the Leafs took the play to the home side, out shooting Castlegar 11-4 in the third.Patrick Martens led the Nelson attack with a pair of second period goals. Colton Malmsten opened the scoring in the first frame with an assist coming from newly acquired Matti Jmaeff.Jmaeff came to the Leafs earlier this week in a four-team deal that sent former Nelson goalie Darren Hogg to Osoyoos.Grand Forks Border Bruins and Penticton Lakers were also involved in the transaction.Newcomer Connor Beauchamp took the loss in the nets for Castlegar.The two teams play the second half of the home-and-home series tonight at the NDCC Arena in Nelson.Game time is 7 p.m.Hawks rack up 13 as Beaver Valley explodes past Border BruinsThe Beaver Valley Nitehawks scored 10 times, that’s right, 10 times in the final 40 minutes to blast Grand Forks Border Bruins 13-0 in KIJHL opening night action Friday in the Boundary City.Chris Derochie led the attack with six points, including three goals.Craig Martin added a goal and four assists while Ryan Edwards and Scott Davidson each scored twice.Max Flanagan, Justin Niminikin, Mason Spear and Christian Johnson.Zach Perehudoff made 30 saves to register the shutout.Ryan Bryant and Jeremy Mandoli each took turns between the pipes facing the Nitehawk onslaught.The two teams play the second half of the home-and-home series tonight in Fruitvale. Game time is 7:30 [email protected]last_img read more

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Update: Leafs sweep road swing through South Okanagan, shutout Penticton 4-0 and drub Summerland 9-2

first_imgNews flash: The Nelson Leafs can win away from home.The Nelson Leafs swept a pair of road games in the South Okanagan, completing the two-game set with a 4-0 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League win over Penticton Lakers Saturday at the South Okanagan Events Centre.Nelson opened the weekend Friday by drubbing the Summerland Steam 9-2. Patrick Martens continued his torrid start the KIJHL season scoring four times to lead the Leafs. Heading into Saturday’s game Martens was riding an eight-game scoring streak which the speedy forward had accumulated 20 points. He led the Leafs with 23 points, including a team-high 13 goals.Friday Martens scored in each period, including two in the third, to lead the Leafs to its ninth win of the season — the most in the KIJHL.After Jeff Penman scored on Leaf netminder Patrick Defoe less than two minutes into the game, Nelson reeled off seven unanswered goals — three in the first, one in the second and three more in the third — before the Steam scored a power play marker.Colton Schell added a pair while singles went to Nik Newman, Max Mois and Brett Norman.Schell also had four assists to finish the game with six points. Martens had five while Riley Henderson, Matthew Naka, Mois and Norman each had two points.Nelson, improving to 10-3-0-1 in the Murdoch Division, retains its three-point advantage over second place Beaver Valley Nitehawks.The Hawks also won twice on the weekend, edging Spokane 3-1 in the Lilac City Friday before outlasting West Kootenay rival Castlegar Rebels 7-4 Saturday at the Hawks’ Nest.The two Murdoch rivals meet Nelson Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the NDCC Arena.LEAF NOTES: The monster night by Patrick Martens allowed the skillful forward to overtake teammate Matti Jmaeff for the lead in the Nelson scoring race. . . . Brett Norman is tied for second with Jmaeff with Colton Schell fourth, six in back of [email protected]last_img read more

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Large crowd expected for Glenswilly GAA annual 5K

first_imgThey’re under starter’s orders for the annual Glenswilly GAA 5k.The event takes place on Tuesday evening next, June 18th, with the event once again promising to attract a large field of runners and walkers.And with the club’s famous post-race refreshments on offer once again, it’s no wonder! Registration for the fun run and walk takes place on both Monday night from 7-8pm and from 6pm on the evening of the event.Can anyone topple the club’s young running star Sean McGinley on the night?This is a fast course with chipped timing for anyone looking to get an accurate idea of how their training is going.The word is that even former club treasurer Bryan Faul is coming out of retirement for this one (or maybe he’s making the tea!) Entry fee is €10 for adults, €5 for children and €25 for a family.The race starts at 7.30pm but participants are advised to be there in plenty of time for the starting hooter.All funds raised on the night will go directly towards the development of the underage teams in the club.See you all at the finish line for those famous buns and tea!Large crowd expected for Glenswilly GAA annual 5K was last modified: June 11th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:5kglenswillylast_img read more

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