Badgers fail to contain Sullinger, go cold from outside

first_imgWith Ohio State coming to town, Wisconsin knew its biggest priority would be shutting down All-American forward Jared Sullinger.But that didn’t happen, as the No. 20 Badgers (18-6, 7-4) frequently allowed Sullinger to get the ball in comfortable position in the paint during Saturday afternoon’s 58-52 loss to the No. 3 Buckeyes (20-3, 8-2) at the Kohl Center. Sullinger finished with 24 points on 8-of-16 shooting and also pulled down 10 rebounds for his 10th double-double of the season.Forward Jared Berggren, listed at 6-foot-10, 235 pounds, guarded the 6-foot-9, 280-pound Sullinger for much of the first half, in which Sullinger scored 16 of Ohio State’s 28 points. In the second half, the combination of forward Mike Bruesewitz and guard/forward Ryan Evans was used more frequently in an attempt to limit Sullinger from getting the ball in the paint.“Well, I just wanted people who wanted to move their feet and not allow a pass to enter the post,” head coach Bo Ryan said of using Bruesewitz and Evans on Sullinger. “That was an easy decision. How many post touches did he have after that”?Trailing 28-24 at halftime, Wisconsin’s biggest deficit came at the 12:23 mark in the second half following a pair of Sullinger free throws. Berggren played the first seven minutes of the second half, went to the bench for two minutes and then returned at the 10:16 mark. He subbed out at the 7:39 mark and did not return for the remainder of the game, finishing with 10 points on 4-of-8 shooting, three rebounds and two blocks.“At the start of the game, I didn’t do a good job of limiting [Sullinger’s] touches,” Berggren said. “I let him get a couple easy ones early and that set the tone from there. A great player like him, once he gets a little bit of confidence, he’s hard to stop. A lot of it came early on, I let him get going and I’ve got to take a little blame for myself for that one.”Only two other players scored in double-digits for the Buckeyes – forward Deshaun Thomas with 16 points and guard William Buford scored 11 – as the majority of the OSU offense ran through Sullinger. Although the switch to Evans and Bruesewitz was noticeable, Ryan denied any intentional shift in Wisconsin’s game plan.“I’m not going to sell out any particular players or anything, but if anybody thinks that’s what we said we’re going to do coming into that game, then you weren’t at practices watching what was going on,” Ryan said.“We did not play him differently by assignment, by scouting report or anything else. It’s about execution. Some of those teams that doubled him paid – big time. It’s tough to say that we changed what we were doing. The instructions were the same.”Badgers stubbornly inefficient from outsideWisconsin was also consistent with its game plan on the offensive end Saturday afternoon.Despite shooting 2-for-14 from 3-point range in the first half, the Badgers attempted 13 more in the second and made just three. Ultimately, UW finished 5-for-27 (18.5 percent) from behind the arc, stunningly poor for a team that entered the weekend third in the Big Ten in three-point shooting at 36.6 percent.Although they didn’t fall often, Ryan said he liked the looks Wisconsin got from outside.“I thought they shut off stuff going to the rim, and so then you’ve got to go to what’s next, and that’s either kick across or kick out,” he said. “I liked the looks.”Just as the Badgers’ overall offense was balanced – four players scored in double figures – so was their tendency to shoot away from deep. Bruesewitz, who finished third with 11 points, was 1-for-6 from outside. Berggren was 2-for-6 from outside, and point guard Jordan Taylor was 1-for-4. Evans led UW in scoring with 14 points and was 0-2 from outside.“Everybody was getting open looks, we’ve got to knock them down,” Bruesewitz said. “We did a good job moving the ball, Jordan did a great job putting us in position. They were trying to take away him off of ball screens, he did a good job of getting rid of the ball when he needed to.”On Wisconsin’s first possession alone, the Badgers attempted two three-pointers as Berggren missed from deep and Evans corralled the offensive rebound. Taylor nailed a trey to give the Badgers a 3-2 lead, and then Berggren sunk another on their next possession. That three-pointer came at the 17:53 mark, and it was the last UW made in the first half.In the second, the Badgers missed their first three three-point attempts before Berggren made one with 15:35 left. That made the score 32-31 in favor of Ohio State, and it was the closest Wisconsin would come to the lead until 3:46, when a three by Bruesewitz narrowed the Buckeyes’ lead to 51-50.The bucket appeared to give Wisconsin legitimate momentum heading into the game’s final minutes as the Kohl Center was once again electrified, but the Badgers didn’t score until Taylor converted a layup with 43 seconds remaining.“I don’t know if it was an inability, I think we just – especially early in the first half – we missed Berggren and Ryan and myself, other guys in the post a little bit,” Bruesewitz said. “I think we needed to look inside a little bit, especially since our threes weren’t falling for us.”last_img read more

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Private sector bodies object to Government’s new VAT policy

first_img…Finance Ministry denies making changesA number of private sector organizations have come out swinging against measures from the state’s tax regime — measures that have started biting into the livelihoods of exporters. However, this development comes even as Government is distancing itself from such changes.Finance Minister Winston JordanIn a letter seen by this publication, the private sector bodies cited the recent troubles of the Guyana Rice Exporters Association (GREMA), which had complained that changes were made to the policy that allowed them to recoup costs.Where they had previously been allowed to reclaim costs associated with Value Added Tax (VAT) inputs in goods they produced for export, they contended that Finance Minister Winston Jordan had, in a correspondence, backed GRA’s discontinuance of this policy.“Such refund claims were allowed since 2007, when VAT was first introduced,” the letter dated April 19, 2018 stated. “We consider the decision by the Government and the GRA a reversal of a commitment you gave the country less than four months ago: that none of these proposed amendments will negatively affect any individual or business. We also consider your new position ill-advised and counterproductive to the interests of the businesses we represent and to the economy of our country.”“Responding to concerns raised by the President of GREMA that the action by the Government is negatively affecting the competitiveness of the rice exporters, you advised that the export of rice is an exempt item, and that the provisions of the Value Added Tax Act which provide for zero rating of exports do not apply. In justifying the position, you volunteered that you had consulted with the Commissioner- General of GRA.”The letter went on to point out that it appeared the minister was “badly misled”. The bodies in the letter reminded the Finance Minister that it is he, and not the GRA, that bears responsibility for setting policy. It urged the minister to remind GRA of its duty to just administer the tax laws.Wasn’t meBut the Finance Ministry, in a statement on Friday (April 20), strongly denied that any changes have been made, or will be made, that will impact exporters in a negative way. The ministry’s denial came on the heels of Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo alerting the public to this impending change.In fact, the ministry accused this publication of not telling the truth in the story published on Friday (April 20) while failing to make known the minister’s correspondence to GREMA.“The Ministry categorically denies this allegation, and makes pellucid that the export of taxable items remains zero rated. Since the implementation of VAT in 2007, it has not been charged on exports, and that has not changed. Furthermore, there have been no discussions or contemplation to charge VAT on exports.”“Please be assured,” it had continued, “that such a proposal with far reaching consequences would not be introduced without proper consultation and analysis of the impact on the manufacturing sector and the export and local economy. It should be noted, in accordance with section 17 and 18 of the VAT Act, where the local supply of goods is taxable, they are zero rated for export. In these cases, input VAT can be recovered. However, if the local supply of goods is exempt, then the export of these items is considered an exempt supply.”At a press conference on Thursday, Jagdeo had revealed that local Guyanese exporters are next in line to be taxed by the current Government as serious consideration is being given to have the zero rating of exports for Value Added Tax (VAT) purposes removed.Jagdeo had said that this new development was brought to his attention recently.According to Jagdeo, exporters were shocked to learn of the coalition Government’s plans to implement this new taxation initiative. He said it is a misguided approach to collecting more taxes. He had said this decision could destroy the entire local export sector, where goods are going to become internationally uncompetitive, factories will have to close, and more people could lose their jobs.“Almost every country in the world where VAT is in place, they have a zero rating of the exports. So, it allows the producers to claim back their input VAT on their imports, so they can be internationally competitive. In our case, this will change,” Jagdeo told the media conference.The PPP General Secretary said this matter has been engaging the attention of the Guyana Manufacturing and Services Association (GMSA), where there are “serious worries in those quarters.”Jagdeo said he hopes the organisation will take some urgent action to represent people in this regard, and to call on the minister to reverse this decision forthwith.He said, “It will harm our economy and damage all our exports the way it is now being treated.”GMSA President Shyam Nokta previously blasted the Government’s tax measures and lack of an economic plan, saying Government’s policies were harming, rather than helping, the manufacturing sector.There is no positive indication that Guyana has so far managed to manoeuvre its way out of the economic slow lane in which it has been stuck for the past three years due to the minimal GDP growth.Finance Minister Winston Jordan made this admission during a press conference last week. Revealing that the 2017 end-of-year economic report has been completed, he linked the dismal figures to sectors, including sugar.Initially, Government had projected that Guyana’s economy would have grown by a 3.8 per cent growth rate for 2017. This projection was reduced to 3.1 per cent, and then again to 2.9 per cent.last_img read more

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Calls made for new building for Gaelscoil in Donegal Town

first_imgDeputy Pat the Cope Gallagher has raised the issue of the need for a new school building for Gaelscoi na gCeithrel Mhaistrí in Donegal Town with the Department of Education.He said there is a clear and urgent need for a new school building for the Gaelscoil.A delegation from the school previously met with officials from the Department of Education in the Dáil while Deputy Gallagher said he has raised this issue on a continuous basis with the Minister and his officials . Pat the Cope said the reply from the Minister said the plans for the new school have been submitted.The Minister replied “My Department recently received the Stage 2a submission from the Design Team, which is now under review.  Following the Department’s review of the submission, a Stakeholders meeting will be arranged, to which the school will be invited, and if there are no issues outstanding after the Stage 2(a) meeting the project can be authorised to progress to Stage 2b (Detailed Design Stage).  This stage includes the applications for Planning Permission, Fire Certificate, Disability Access Certificate and the preparation of Tender Documents. ”Deputy Gallagher said that while he welcomes the progress to date on the Gaelscoil project, it must be admitted that actual progress is slow and extremely time-consuming.He added “I am imploring on the Department that a fresh impetus and renewed determination is given to this project in order to quickly move it to the next stage. “This project needs to get to actual design stage and a full planning application be lodged with Donegal County Council, until we get to this juncture in the project, we will not see the end line in sight.“Therefore, I am requesting the Minister and the Department to finalise the current stage without delay, and to sanction the next step in this project .”Calls made for new building for Gaelscoil in Donegal Town was last modified: October 16th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Donegal TownGaelscoilnew schoollast_img read more

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Our Solar System Is a Rare Gem

first_imgAs if in time for the upcoming film release of The Privileged Planet (see 06/24/2004 headline), Philip Ball wrote a line for Nature Science Update that would have dismayed Carl Sagan and a host of SETI researchers: “Earth-like planets may be more rare than thought… In cosmic terms, our solar system could be special after all.”  The opinion is coming from research on extrasolar planets that suggests they were formed by a different process than what formed ours.  If that is so, according to Martin Beer, our solar system may be highly unusual and “there won’t necessarily be lots of other Earths up there.”  Ball comments,Ever since Copernicus displaced the Earth from the centre of the Universe, astronomers have tended to assume that there is nothing special about our place in the cosmos.  But apparently our planetary system might not be so normal after all.  Is it just chance that makes Jupiter different from other extrasolar planets?  Beer and his colleagues suspect not.Ball suggests that our solar system was formed by accretion of planetesimals, whereas the extrasolar planets seen so far were formed by a rapid disk instability process.  The observations show 110 Jupiter-class objects with wildly eccentric orbits or orbits too close to the star; in either case, rocky planets in the habitable zone could not exist.  In contrast, our Jupiter is far from the sun, and both Earth and Jupiter have nearly circular orbits.  More observations will be required to discern whether there really are two methods for making solar systems, and for determining “how unusual we really are.”    An article on Astrobiology Magazine makes a similar statement.  “On the evidence to date, our solar system could be fundamentally different from the majority of planetary systems around stars because it formed in a different way.  If that is the case, Earth-like planets will be very rare.”  Space.Com has a similar report.It was common for magazine and newspaper articles in the Sagan era to claim as matters of fact, “We are nothing special,” and to drone in weary prose set to timeless Vangelis music about how we are lost in space, drifting aimlessly on a tiny speck of insignificant dust in a vast, uncaring universe.  The data so far are not supporting that point of view.  Also, to set the record straight, Copernicus did not displace Earth from the center of the universe, because medieval cosmologists never put it there to begin with (see 06/24/2004 headline).    It’s refreshing to see Philip Ball and some others starting to change their tone and recognize the extraordinary congruence of improbable factors that make our planet beautiful.  Next step is to help them cure their bad habit of talking like eyewitness news reporters, and treating speculative theories as historical facts.  Most of the following fairy tale from the NSU article, for instance, is built on imagination, not fact:The planets in our Solar System were put together from small pieces.  The cloud of gas and dust that surrounded our newly formed Sun agglomerated into little pebbles, which then collided and stuck together to form rocky boulders and eventually mini-planets, called planetesimals.  The coalescence of planetesimals created rocky planets such as Earth and Mars, and the solid cores of giant planets such as Jupiter, which then attracted thick atmospheres of gas.Recent observations are showing that stars blast away their dust disks in short order, far too rapidly for the formation of planets, even if the rest of the fairy tale were true.  But then, small bits of dust and rock do not stick together; they bounce.  What’s more, it takes a pretty large body to have enough gravity to start attracting material around it, and then it has to stop attracting material in time to avoid being dragged into the star.  So there are multiple improbabilities in getting a solar system to form.  Even the showcase of planetary evolution, Tau Ceti, is now looking too hostile to be considered a planet garden (see 07/06/2004 headline).  If you don’t accept the Design viewpoint, you have to thank your lucky star: the sun.(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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East London woman campaigns for babies born with clubfoot

first_imgNisha Varghese, who has cerebral palsy, says she knows it’s tough when you cannot walk, which is why she wants to help children born with clubfoot.Nisha Varghese has an online campaign to raise money for at least 50 children who are born with clubfoot to get treatment. Varghese (in front, left) with her mother, Anne, and Play Your Part ambassador Catherine Constantinides (right). (Images supplied)Melissa JavanNisha Varghese, who is from East London, has cerebral palsy. Despite her disabilities, the 26-year-old is always on a mission to make people’s lives better. Her latest campaign is helping children who are born with clubfoot to get treatment and have their feet fixed.MiracleFeet says clubfoot affects one in every 800 children worldwide. The American group provides organisational, technical and financial support to clinics throughout the world in order to provide treatment to children born with clubfoot.Varghese is working through MiracleFeet to raise money for children in impoverished communities in more than 20 countries, including Liberia and Tanzania.Clubfoot (or talipes equinovarus) is a congenital birth defect that causes one or both feet to turn inwards and upwards. Cerebral palsy is a condition caused by damage to a baby’s brain before or during their birth, which makes their limbs and muscles permanently weak.So far, through MiracleFeet, about 27,000 lives have been transformed in 24 countries and 194 clinics have been supported worldwide.“Children deserve opportunities”Varghese is no stranger to fundraising. She has been involved with initiatives such as the Smile Train and the Not For Sale Campaign.She came across MiracleFeet, she says, while researching charities that have sustainable impact. “I believe that all children deserve the opportunity to live to their fullest potential without the hindrance of clubfoot.“Additionally, I know how hard life is when one can’t walk and although I can’t fix my cerebral palsy, there is a cure for clubfoot. I’m going to make sure I fix every child who I can that way. My suffering is not for nothing.”Watch Nisha Varghese’s crowdfunding campaign video:Treatment for each child costs $250 (about R3,500) and already 17 children can get treated through Varghese’s crowdfunding efforts. The treatment used is the non-surgical Ponseti Method.Writer Melissa Javan spoke to Varghese.Melissa Javan: When did you start getting involved with community work and fundraising?Nisha Varghese: I started my community work and fundraising at the age of 19. In retrospect I realise that while losing myself in the service of others, I accidently found the best version of me – the me I didn’t even know I wanted to be.Nisha Varghese paraglides in Cape Town to raise awareness of people who live in Saharawi refugee camps.MJ: What is cerebral palsy?NV: Cerebral palsy is a neurological condition that affects speech and movement. [Because I have cerebral palsy] I can’t walk and my speech is sometimes difficult to understand.MJ: What are the myths around it?NV: Some people think cerebral palsy affects everybody the same way when, in fact, it affects people to varying degrees depending on how badly the brain was damaged during the injury.MJ: How do you go about setting up a fundraising campaign?NV: I contact the non-profit organisation I am interested in working with and ask if it is partnered with a fundraising platform. If the answer is yes I follow a simple sign-up process and start fundraising.MJ: What have you learned about fundraising and marketing on social media?NV: I have learned that fundraising using social media is not about the monetary goal you set or even reaching it, but rather it’s about telling a good story and conveying to people why you’re doing what you’re doing.MJ: What is the most important thing about fundraising?NV: It is knowing why you’re doing what you’re doing and attempting to convey that to the public as creatively as humanly possible.MJ: What charities have you supported in the past?NV: During 2010-2012 I raised $7,862 for The Water Project, Inc. The money was used to build a well for a community in Kenya. Since then, I have raised $1,075 for the Not For Sale Campaign, $1,088.84 for the Elton John Aids Foundation (UK), $5,307 for the Malala Fund, and $10,317.04 for Smile Train, which was enough to pay for 41 cleft-repair surgeries.Apart from fundraising I also raise awareness about causes and issues I care about. On 10 April 2017 I went paragliding in Cape Town to raise awareness about the Western Sahara. It is the last colony in Africa which has been illegally occupied – by Morocco for the past 41 years due to the fact that it is rich in natural resources. Thank you to my real-life superhero Catherine Constantinides, a Play Your Part ambassador, who made me and the rest of the world aware of this issue by literally going to the Saharawi refugee camps and living with the Saharawi people for a time.Source: Miracle Feet and CrowdriseWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Closing Multiple Gaps in a Premiere Pro Timeline

first_imgLearn how to close the gaps between clips in your Premiere Pro timeline.  Use this quick tip to speed up your Premiere Pro video editing.When you work on a video editing sequence in Premiere Pro you may find that you have many clips with gaps in-between them.  Closing each of these gaps can be time consuming!  With this quick tip, first taught to me by Premiere Pro expert Ann Bens, you can close all your Premiere Pro timeline gaps fast!  Let’s jump in…So, we start with our Premiere Pro timeline with lots of gaps. This example is using large gaps just for demonstration purposes, however sometimes its smallest gaps in sequences can equal disaster!  In general, you should rid your sequence of all gaps for smooth and predictable results.Sequence With GapsNext you need to create a new ‘Color Matte’.Selecting A New ‘Color Matte’Accept the dialogue box that is basically asking you if you want the color matte to match the settings of your presently selected sequence.New Color Matte Dialogue BoxPress OK and then name it (if you want to) and hit OK. To be honest it’s not really important to name the matte as it isn’t going to stay in your timeline by the time you’ve finished. However, I like to name things because then I know why they are there in my project panel in the first place – but it’s up to you.Name ItNow, move that color matte to the video layer above the clips which have the gaps in them and trim it out to the same length as the total of all the clips.Putting The Color Matte Over The Clips With GapsNext, select all the clips in your video layer which has gaps in it – make sure they are all selected – and then drag them up over the color matte but DO NOT deselect them!Select Clips And Move Them Over The MatteAfter this – and with the clips still selected – click on any one of the clips and drag them all back down to their original video layer.With The Clips Still Selected Bring Them Back To Video 1As you can see, this leaves color matte clips which are the same length and placing as any gaps you may have had between your video clips.So finally, select all the remaining color matte clips in the layer above your video clips and then right click on any one of them (with them all selected) and choose ‘Ripple Delete’.Select The Color Matte Clips – Right Click And Choose Ripple DeleteAnd, as if by magic, the color matte goes and so do all the gaps that were in your Premiere Pro timeline!All Gaps Closed And Color Matte Gone!A very useful Premiere Pro tip to close up all the gaps in you timeline!  Thanks to Ann Bens for sharing.last_img read more

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Our Favorite Film and Video Editing Mantras

first_img[email protected] 1. Be fast and reliable 2. Go outside 3. Go home — Rob Ashe, Jr. (@sirashe) January 15, [email protected] 1- Own the project 2- Not all clients know what they want 3- Don’t let your professionalism cloud your judgment #postchat— Jonathan St. John (@mdvideoeditor) January 14, 2015 Be a better film or video editor! Memorize a few of these video editing mantras to guide you as you work.For new video editors looking to improve their craft, there are a few editing truths that have stood the test of time in the cutting room. They are the kind of things you can learn by experience, but having them passed on by other editors is a decent shortcut to getting a lot better, very quickly. As with any axiom you really need to think through not only your own work, but how best to unpack and apply the rule in your given situation. In this post I’ve rounded up a few of my favorite video editing mantras.Walter Murch’s Rule of SixEmotion (51%)Story (23%)Rhythm (10%)Eye-trace (7%)Two-dimensional plane of screen (5%)Three-dimensional space of action (4%)These six guidelines are what legendary film editor Walter Murch believes are some of the most important things to consider when making a cut. The percentages beside each one are, for Murch, a simple way of demonstrating which rules carry the most weight. For example, a cut that works for the emotion of the moment is better than ones that simple adhere to the continuity within the scene. For a deeper explanation of Murch’s rule of six there is a good write up over on AOTG.com worth checking out.Murch first codified these ‘rules of editing’ in his book In The Blink Of An Eye, which is one of the books I recommend in my second instalment of Books For Film Editors. Walter’s book is well worth a read.‘Murder Your Darlings’One of the reasons that new editors’ work is often a bit long and boring is because they’ve not learned to ‘Murder their Darlings’ – a slightly gruesome way of say that you need to be brutal enough to take out your favorite scenes or moments if doing so makes the whole film better as a result. This demands a certain amount of discipline and decisiveness, but it is vital to creating great work.Often when you’ve taken a major piece out of your film, you need to leave it a while to see if you really miss it. A little bit of time and distance from the material, even if that’s just over night, can make a huge difference in gaining real objectivity on whether the murder of the darling really does make the film better. Be sure to duplicate your sequence before making any major change, so that if it’s better with it, you can always go back!For a few more thoughts on how to maintain your objectivity check out this previous post: 5 Tips To Create Better Work By Maintaining A Fresh Perspective.#Postchat Editors Editing MantrasIn a recent Twitter conversation the collective #postchat editors shared their thoughts, some more seriously than others, on what makes for good editing guidelines. Here are a few of my favorites. You can check out the entire transcript of the conversation here. @Dr0id 1. Don’t say “that won’t work” unless 100% certain” 2. Watch scenes w/o sound for flow 3. Don’t put in music too early in process— Kelly Herron (@KellyGHerron) January 15, 2015center_img Share Your Editing MantrasThese are some of my favorite video editing mantras, but there are plenty more besides these. Hit the comments section and share your favorites!last_img read more

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County Championship: fans of all 18 counties preview the cricket season

first_imgShare on WhatsApp NorthamptonshireIf the batting holds tight, there’s potential for promotion from Division Two. Richard Gleeson will have learned a tremendous amount with his exploits overseas for the Lions, so he could make his mark on the county scene. Together with Ben Sanderson, this has the potential to be a potent Division Two attack. Doug Bracewell is a shrewd early season signing. And the recruitment of Ricardo Vasconcelos will bolster the explosive batting talents of Ben Duckett, Josh Cobb and Adam Rossington. Mark Pearson Northamptonshire players pose during the club’s media day ahead of the new season. Photograph: Matt West/BPI/Rex/Shutterstock Pinterest GloucestershireGloucestershire will probably finish fourth or fifth in the table. Much depends on how Chris Dent goes as the new captain and whether it affects his runs. James Bracey and George Hankins are promising batsman and hopefully will score good middle order runs. Much will depend on Liam Norwell and how Australian bowler Daniel Worrall starts the season. I’m looking forward to more consistency from Jack Taylor now he’s vice captain. He is an explosive batsman and will be key to finishing innings. Charles Berkeley Twitter Pinterest Pinterest SomersetA good season would probably be mid-table in the Championship. While there is always talk of challenging for silverware at Taunton, most fans acknowledge this side is in transition. There has been major upheaval on and off the pitch in the last 12 months. With the club deciding not to go ahead with Cameron Bancroft as our overseas player, and all but one of our pre-season fixtures falling victim to the weather, it’s difficult to know who will line up for the first game. Only James Hildreth and Steve Davies could be considered batsmen in their prime. But we have the most balanced bowling attack in country cricket. Craig and Jamie Overton, Lewis Gregory, Jack Leach and Dom Bess will bowl most sides out. And if Marcus Trescothick finally calls it a day at the end of this season, every second I can spend watching him will be treasured. Nicholas Fisher Twitter County Championship Division One Pinterest Hampshire Twitter WorcestershireAnother season of competitive games in the First Division beckons, with a young and local squad who are eager to press on. The trouble is going to come on two fronts. Firstly, opposition batting line-ups will provide a stern test for our young bowlers, with Josh Tongue’s raw pace crucial in the team’s fight for survival. The second worry is opposition bowling line-ups boasting much more international quality, which will test our inexperienced batting line-up highly dependent on Daryl Mitchell’s ageing hands. Young batsman Joe Clarke has had a promising winter on the Lions tour. He has the temperament and technique to play for England, and the calibre of bowling he will be up against will surely help him push his case forward. It’s likely to be a frustrating season, full of promising performances in spurts, which ultimately results in relegation, but with a squad that will be keen to bounce straight back. The perennial yo-yo club will continue its legacy. Josh TempleYorkshireYorkshire will do well to survive again this season. The loss of Ryan Sidebottom will be felt. It’s no coincidence that the County Championship followed him from Nottinghamshire back to Yorkshire, and that his winding down last year led to Yorkshire’s downturn in performances. That, alongside our poor top order, will mean a difficult season for us. The loss of Adil Rashid will impact our ability to recover from batting collapses and take the wickets of tailenders. I’m excited to see Harry Brook come on after a few appearances last season. I would prefer to see him shielded from the new ball at five or six. Also Matt Fisher who should get more opportunities following the retirement of Sidebottom and the early season injury of Ben Coad. Steve Cochrane Facebook How will Gloucestershire do under new captain Chris Dent? Photograph: TGSPhoto/Rex/Shutterstock Share via Email County Championship 2018: Divisions One and Two team-by-team guide Facebook Twitter Pinterest Sussex’s Jofra Archer will be hoping to see more cartwheeling stumps this season Photograph: Mike Hewitt/Getty Images Facebook Facebook County Championship Division Two Marcus Trescothick will be hoping for another strong twilight year at Somerset. Photograph: Gary Day/Frozen in Motion/Rex/Shutterstock Tim Bresnan takes a selfie with coach Andrew Gale as Yorkshire prepare for their 2018 team photo. Photograph: Allan McKenzie/SWpix.com/REX/Shutterstock Facebook Twitter Share on Pinterest Nottinghamshire Share on Messenger WarwickshireWarwickshire have one of the best squads in Division Two – on paper. Ian Bell and Jonathan Trott have 11,562 Test runs between them and Jeetan Patel remains arguably the best spin bowler across the two divisions. There’s a plethora of young talent that deserve an opportunity. Ed Pollock is arguably the most exciting player to have played for the club since Brendon McCullum. The last time we were in Division Two, we rebounded at the first attempt and went on to enjoy one of our most successful spells in the modern era. We won’t be too far away from promotion this year. Edward Payne More runs are expected this season from Aneurin Donald. Photograph: Huw Evans/REX/Shutterstock Pinterest Twitter Share on Twitter County cricket talking points: six questions before the new season SussexSussex are obviously struggling financially against bigger counties with Test grounds. As a result we haven’t signed a much-needed opener or an overseas pro to replace fast bowler Ishant Sharma, when he leaves in early June. We have lost our bowling coach, Jon Lewis, to the England U-19s. Jofra Archer is a proven star of the future. We also have Chris Jordan, George Garton and Stuart Whittingham to claim one of the best pace attacks. Luke Wells and Stiaan Van Zyl are our only true batsman, but hopefully Luke Wright can rediscover his 2015 form. Hopefully youngsters Tom Haines, Phillip Salt or Harry Finch will become solid players. Hugh Johnson Read more Facebook Pinterest Facebook Lancashire Paul Stirling will be hoping for a strong season for Middlesex. Photograph: Alex Davidson/REX/Shutterstock KentExpectations are low around the St Lawrence. Two years ago Essex pipped us to the solitary promotion spot. I had high expectations last year, with Jason Gillespie and Alan Donald providing coaching support, Sam Northeast, Sam Billings, Daniel Bell-Drummond and Joe Denly providing exciting run scoring potential and the nagging ability of Darren Stevens to somehow get 50+ wickets a season. But for a multitude of reasons we were never in the hunt. Since then Northeast has left us for Hampshire, and bowling talent Matt Coles hopped over the Dartford Crossing to Essex. Throw in our IPL bound captain Billings, it’s clear to see why all is not rosy in the garden of England. Rob Lingham Read more SurreyThe main challenge for Surrey will be replacing the runs, experience and class of Kumar Sangakkara. Mitchell Marsh has been signed as the replacement overseas player and will be expected to provide a weight of middle-order runs. Surrey will also need to adapt to the challenge of several players potentially being away with England, with Mark Stoneman, Jason Roy, the Curran brothers and Ben Foakes all potentially on the selectors’ radar. New four-day captain Rory Burns should be given the chance to exert his influence, with a potentially diminishing role for 41-year-old Gareth Batty. Andrew Gamwell Nottinghamshire coach Peter Moores jokes with Samit Patel and captain Steven Mullaney. Photograph: Tim Goode/PA Since you’re here… Reuse this content Facebook Twitter NottinghamshireMuch will depend on whether overseas signing Ross Taylor can hit the ground running. Not having Chris Read, Alex Hales, Michael Lumb or Brendan Taylor for red-ball cricket anymore leaves a big hole in our batting. Chris Nash looks like a shrewd acquisition, but Tom Moores is unproven and may not fill the gap left by Chris Read. Away from the obvious international stars, there is no cleaner striker of a ball than Riki Wessels. If he stays fit, Mark Footitt will be key with the ball. His express pace adds much-needed variety to the attack. Not having an established spinner may be problematic later on in the season if we have a dry summer, but hopefully young Matt Carter can step up. Calum McKenzie A lot is expected of Surrey wicketkeeper Ben Foakes. Photograph: Philip Brown/Getty Images Twitter Topics Facebook EssexI thought we’d narrowly avoid relegation before last season, so found our Championship win quite astonishing. But Simon Harmer won’t be the same unknown quantity this season and Jamie Porter will also be treated with more respect. Our middle order batting is somewhat brittle; it wasn’t regularly exposed last year due to Alastair Cook’s early-season involvement, which will be much reduced in 2018. Some of the aimless and generally negative captaincy at other clubs accounted for the huge discrepancy in the number of wins achieved by Essex compared to everyone else. The more enlightened teams will be far more proactive this season. Michael SheaHampshireHaving only survived in Division One two years ago thanks to Durham’s demotion, we avoided the drop last season by just two points. Hasim Amla being available for the first three months of the season is huge news. James Vince finally found some form for England, so hopefully he will be confident when he returns. Reece Topley’s time at Hampshire has been heavily injury-affected but, if he rediscovers the form that took him to the England ODI and T20 sides a few years back, he could be lethal. Cam Melling Support The Guardian LancashireHaving surprised almost everyone by finishing second last year, the team has set an exceptionally high standard that will be hard to live up to in such an even division. Bowlers Kyle Jarvis and Ryan McLaren will be difficult to replace and it’ll be interesting to see how Joe Mennie settles in. New captain Liam Livingstone will be playing for England before the end of the year; Haseeb Hameed oozes class; and both Matt Parkinson and Saqib Mahmood are poised for breakout years. Michael Birtwistle Cricket Share on LinkedIn LeicestershireA season of gentle progress and sober consolidation after a calamitous, underwhelming 2017 season would be great. The inability to bowl the opposition out twice led again to no wins, nine defeats out of 14 and a rightful place propping up Division Two last year. The recruitment of Indian quick Varun Aaron and Pakistani seamer Mohammad Abbas on a job share hopefully improves our bowling attack. New club coach and Foxes legend Paul Nixon will bring energy and a positive mindset to a squad that blends county circuit journeymen with youthful promising talent. Much will depend on the consistent excellence of Mark Cosgrove and our new club captain, 38-year-old Hampshire recruit Michael Carberry. Darren LissamanMiddlesexWe have a talented squad but international calls may make things difficult. Early season injuries to several first-choice players have meant fielding under-strength teams in warm-up matches. I’m hoping to see Max Holden cement a place in the team by scoring big. He’s a level-headed young man with sound technique. Paul Stirling usually scores his runs quickly so that increases our chances of forcing wins. If Steve Finn and Toby Roland-Jones can stay fit, and avoid England call-ups, they ought to be able to knock over a lot of Division Two batting line-ups. But promotion is far from certain. Martin Hadland Facebook Will new captain Liam Livingstone have another successful season with Lancashire? Photograph: Nathan Stirk/Getty Images Share on Facebook features Pinterest Pinterest Essex Twitter … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Twitter DerbyshireI hope we can challenge for promotion, but my head tells me it will be another season of struggle. The addition of West Indies bowler Ravi Rampaul and South African seamer Duanne Olivier should finally go some way to address the departure of Mark Footitt. Matt Critchley is an exciting prospect, so it will be interesting to see how much he features. I’m not sure if we’ve strengthened sufficiently in the batting lineup though. Edward SelveyDurhamEven without the 48 point deduction last year, we would only have finished 7th in the Second Division. And with the departures of Keaton Jennings, Graham Onions, and Paul Coughlin, along with the one-year ban handed to Jack Burnham, things don’t really look great. Cameron Steel was the highlight of last season, so I’m looking forward to seeing how he develops this year. New Zealand opener Tom Latham is also coming back later in the season, and he looked a cut above everyone last year. Until then South Africa’s Aiden Markram will play a few games, and he also looks quality. But we can’t realistically be aiming for much higher than a top half finish. Chris ParkerGlamorganIt goes against the grain, and a lifetime of deeply painful cricketing memories, to approach a new season with genuine confidence in Glamorgan’s prospects. We have our best crop of youngsters since the Huw Morris, Matthew Maynard and Robert Croft era. With Maynard set to return to the fold as a specialist batting coach, this could be a breakout year for the big hitting Aneurin Donald. Having equalled Ravi Shastri’s record for the fastest double-century in first class cricket at the tender age of 19, Donald hasn’t quite found the consistency that would take him to the next level. If Maynard can put that right, it will be a case of bowlers beware! Kevin McGrath Pinterest last_img read more

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Montreal police announce plan to combat profiling of racial minorities

first_imgMONTREAL — A lawyer working on behalf of the Black Coalition of Quebec is seeking approval for a class action lawsuit against the city of Montreal for alleged racial profiling practices by the police.The news of the lawsuit comes as city police announced a new plan today to combat profiling.Officers presented city council with their commitments, which include more police training and a plan to begin collecting and analyzing data related to racial profiling complaints.Meanwhile Lawyer Jacky-Eric Salvant says he is seeking $4 million in damages from the city on behalf of 500 people who claim they were singled out by city police officers because of their race.Salvant said the lawsuit will be filed in the coming days once the city has been served with court papers.Salvant alleges the rights of non-whites in the city are routinely violated by police officers who stop them on the street or in their cars due to the colour of their skin.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Timeline of events in British Columbia homicide manhunt

first_imgWINNIPEG — Police say they believe they have found the bodies of two young men who were wanted in the deaths of three people in northern B.C. Here’s a timeline of events:July 15 — The bodies of a man and a woman are found near a blue van on the Alaska Highway, also known as Highway 97, near Liard Hot Springs, B.C.July 17 — RCMP say the deaths are suspicious.July 18 — RCMP announce Australian Lucas Fowler, 23, and his 24-year-old American girlfriend, Chynna Deese, are homicide victims. Meanwhile, in Jade City, B.C., Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, are spotted in a store where they stopped for free coffee. Jade City is about 350 kilometres from where the two bodies were found.July 19 — Police announce the body of a man has been found two kilometres from a burned-out truck belonging to McLeod and Schmegelsky near Dease Lake, B.C. The two teens are missing. Dease Lake is about 470 kilometres from the first crime scene.July 21 — McLeod and Schmegelsky are spotted in Cold Lake, Alta., where a local resident, not knowing who they are, helps them free a stuck Toyota Rav 4 they are driving. The are also captured on security camera footage at a store in Meadow Lake, Sask.July 22 — Mounties say Fowler and Deese were shot. They release composite sketches of a man seen speaking with the couple on the highway where they were found dead and a sketch of the unidentified man found dead near the burned truck. Fowler’s father, an Australian police inspector, pleads for public help in the investigation. At the same time, band constables with Tataskweyak Cree Nation at Split Lake in northern Manitoba talk with McLeod and Schmegelsky at a checkstop, unaware of who they are. The constables see camping gear and maps in their vehicle.July 23 — RCMP announce Schmegelsky and McLeod are suspects in the three deaths. They release photos of the men and a 2011 grey Toyota Rav 4 they may have been driving. Fox Lake Cree Nation says a burned-out vehicle is found near Gillam, Man., about 170 kilometres east of Split Lake. Police search that area.July 24 — RCMP confirm the burned-out vehicle near Gillam is the Toyota Rav 4 the suspects are believed to have been driving. The third victim is identified as 64-year-old Leonard Dyck of Vancouver. He was a lecturer in the University of British Columbia’s botany department.July 25 — Manitoba Mounties confirm two sightings of Schmegelsky and McLeod in the Gillam area. RCMP say the sightings, along with no reports of stolen vehicles, lead investigators to believe the suspects are still in the region. They say they are investigating a photograph of Nazi paraphernalia allegedly sent by Schmegelsky to another user on a video game network. Schmegelsky is also pictured in military fatigues brandishing an airsoft rifle and wearing a gas mask.July 28 — RCMP descend on York Landing, an isolated community southwest of Gillam, after it’s reported the suspects were seen at the local dump.July 29 — RCMP are unable to confirm the sighting and pull back to Gillam.July 31 — Police announce they have done everything they can and are scaling back the search, although not ending it.Aug. 2 — RCMP say they found a damaged rowboat on the Nelson River.Aug. 4 — RCMP dive team conducts underwater search “of significant areas of interest.”Aug. 6 — RCMP say they have found several items linked to Schmegelsky and McLeod on the shore of the Nelson River in northern Manitoba. The Mounties would not disclose what the items are but say they were found nine kilometres from the vehicle they were driving.Aug. 7 — Police say they believe they have found the bodies of McLeod and Schmegelsky in dense brush in northern Manitoba. RCMP Assistant Commissioner Jane MacLatchy said the bodies were found earlier in the morning near the shoreline of the Nelson River, within a kilometre of where several items linked to the two suspects were found. Autopsies are scheduled to confirm their identities. The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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