Large crowd expected for Glenswilly GAA annual 5K

first_imgThey’re under starter’s orders for the annual Glenswilly GAA 5k.The event takes place on Tuesday evening next, June 18th, with the event once again promising to attract a large field of runners and walkers.And with the club’s famous post-race refreshments on offer once again, it’s no wonder! Registration for the fun run and walk takes place on both Monday night from 7-8pm and from 6pm on the evening of the event.Can anyone topple the club’s young running star Sean McGinley on the night?This is a fast course with chipped timing for anyone looking to get an accurate idea of how their training is going.The word is that even former club treasurer Bryan Faul is coming out of retirement for this one (or maybe he’s making the tea!) Entry fee is €10 for adults, €5 for children and €25 for a family.The race starts at 7.30pm but participants are advised to be there in plenty of time for the starting hooter.All funds raised on the night will go directly towards the development of the underage teams in the club.See you all at the finish line for those famous buns and tea!Large crowd expected for Glenswilly GAA annual 5K was last modified: June 11th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:5kglenswillylast_img read more

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Dinosaur Evolution Story Survives In Spite of Evidence

first_imgAfter the mass extinction at the end of the Permian, Dicynodondisappeared and other related species were so greatly decreased that newly emerging herbivores could suddenly compete with them.Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-04-dinosaur-predecessors-gain-ground-world.html#jCp(Visited 21 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The evolutionary story of extinction and the rise of dinosaurs faces challenges, but survives when the glue of imagination holds fragmentary evidence together.A frequent kind of upset in many evolutionary scenarios is evidence that creatures and their ancestors appeared earlier than thought.  That’s what happened to dinosaur ancestors, according to Live Science: “Dinosaurs – or at least their ancestors – may have gotten an earlier start than once believed.”Fossils of archosaurs, thought to be dinosaur ancestors by evolutionists, appear in Africa and Antarctica doing just fine after the so-called Permian extinction that should have wiped them out along with 90% of other life forms, it is alleged.  One paleontologist has to insert a long hiatus into the evolutionary story: “We get the hint that the dinosaur radiation, which we don’t really see in the fossil record until about 20 million years later, is really starting to take off in this region.”Yet the Permian extinction lacks any known cause: “No one knows why the mass extinction happened,” the article says.  Could it be an artifact of the evolutionary approach to the data, dependent upon a consensus? After all, “The fossil record around the Permian extinction is spotty,” the article says, “with most paleontological research coming from a few fossil sites in Russia and in South Africa.”  On that note, Science Daily cast some doubt on the venerable event itself.  Did 9 out of 10 species perish?  “It turns out, however, that scientists may have been looking in the wrong places.”By piecing together two “snapshots” before and after the alleged Permian extinction using disconnected bits of fossil evidence from different parts of the world, Christian Sidor, a biologist at the University of Washington salvaged Darwinism.  He made up a story about different kinds of animals evolving to fill various niches in different ways after the presumed extinction.That’s another evolutionary storytelling plot: if you loosen up the competition, evolution will take advantage of it.  From Science Daily:“These scientists have identified an outcome of mass extinctions–that species ecologically marginalized before the extinction may be ‘freed up’ to experience evolutionary bursts then dominate after the extinction,” says H. Richard Lane, program director in NSF’s Division of Earth Sciences.According to the plot described by PhysOrg, Dicynodon, a pig-sized animal with a small tail, ever-growing tusks like an elephant and a beak like a turtle, was the dominant herbivore. “After the mass extinction at the end of the Permian, Dicynodon disappeared and other related species were so greatly decreased that newly emerging herbivores could suddenly compete with them.”  But how did these herbivores emerge?  Where did they come from?Sidor even got political.  “He likened the change to politics: It’s hard to dislodge an incumbent politician, but once you do, anyone could step in to fill the gap,” Live Science said.  He made up a term for that, PhysOrg reported: “What we call evolutionary incumbency was fundamentally reset.”  Then Sidor alleged that humans are causing another mass extinction in our time.  So what?  Why couldn’t humans claim it’s just another reset of evolutionary incumbency?These articles are based on a press release from the National Science Foundation that Astrobiology Magazine and others republished without comment. Sidor published his ideas in PNAS, where he introduced the concept of “evolutionary incumbency” as a kind of “biotic control” on evolution.  “The recognition of heterogeneous tetrapod communities in the Triassic implies that the end-Permian mass extinction afforded ecologically marginalized lineages the ecospace to diversify, and that biotic controls (i.e., evolutionary incumbency) were fundamentally reset,” the abstract states.  “Archosaurs, which began diversifying in the Early Triassic, were likely beneficiaries of this ecological release and remained dominant for much of the later Mesozoic.”  His thesis appears to rely on the proverb, “If you build it, they will come.”  Open up the ecospace and new creatures will emerge by blind, unguided processes of evolution.Bird Evolution NewsIn other dinosaur news, PhysOrg claimed that Microraptor gui, a hawk-sized bird that was a good flyer with feathers and all, ate fish.  The article still calls it a “small flying dinosaur.”  Live Science pulled out a Darwinian icon for its headline, claiming that small feathered dinosaurs were “diverse like Darwin’s finches.”  Reporter Megan Gannon said this, replicating fallacies and misinformation:Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection was famously inspired by the diversity of beak shapes among finches on the Galapagos Islands, which he took as a sign that the birds had somehow adapted to the specific environments where they lived. More recent research has shown that Darwin’s finches can evolve quite quickly. For instance, one species shrunk its beak size to better compete with another bird for small seeds in a mere two decades.What Gannon failed to acknowledge was that beak size merely oscillated depending on the weather.  There was no net evolution.  Also, Darwin was not inspired by the finches.  The finch story came later after his ideas on evolution were already formed.  So what does this do for the idea that “feathered dinosaurs” were like Darwin’s finches?  Simply that they “may have similarly adjusted their beak size” in a similar way.  But did they do that on purpose?  A Yale postdoc made this statement: “So, in a way, the evolution of modern dinosaurs — birds — provides insight into ancient, extinct dinosaurs.”But the fossils she was talking about are caenagnathids.  No fossils of these small dinosaurs found in North America have been reported with feathers.  Wikipedia thinks they “would have been covered in feathers.”  Gannon posted an artist’s rendition of a recently-discovered Texas caenagnathid adorned with imaginary feathers – a trick evolutionists have been using for six years (2/08/06, 6/13/07, 9/29/08 commentary, 12/11/09 #2, 1/29/10 #1, 2/18/11 #4).Speaking of birds, another story on Science Daily and Live Science claims that a bird that “lived after the time of dinosaurs” is the ancestor of hummingbirds and swifts: the analyses”suggest that the bird was an evolutionary precursor to the group that includes today’s swifts and hummingbirds.”  The small fossil, 12 centimeters from head to tail and estimated to weigh just an ounce, was found in the Green River formation of Wyoming.  The discoverers do not believe it could hover like hummingbirds or had any of the distinctive traits of the assumed progeny. Here’s the evolutionary spin: “The size of the fossil would indicate that the ancestors of swifts and hummingbirds evolved to be small before they gained their unique flying characteristics,” one of the researchers said.The fossil contains soft tissue, too – remarkable for a specimen claimed to be 50 million years old: “carbon residues in the fossils — once thought to be traces of bacteria that fed on feathers — are fossilized melanosomes, tiny cell structures containing melanin pigments that give birds and other animals their color.”For 12 years we have been showing that the Darwinian conception of earth history is a huge fabrication, built on imagination and ideology.  Fossils are mere props for a fictional story of millions of years that drives the search for credibility.  Since fossils are fragmentary and ambiguous, it is easy to fudge this or that caenagnathid or this or that dicynodon from Zambia or Tanzania into the Grand Myth.  Learn how it’s done.  Learn their catch-phrases (such and such “sheds light on evolution” etc.) and their propaganda techniques so that you won’t be snookered.  “Evolutionary incumbency”—good grief.  Clear the ecospace and watch the magic: new animals will just “emerge.”  If you build it, they will come.  The perpetrators of the myth are so inebriated with Darwine they can’t see what they are doing.  They think it’s science!  Well, what do you expect for research funded in part by the “Evolving Earth Foundation”?A new book by Stephen Meyer, Darwin’s Doubt, is coming out in June.  It will show convincingly how the Cambrian explosion (all animal phyla appearing abruptly in the fossil record) undermines Darwinism and argues for intelligent design.  If you order now (click the link), you can get it at 43% off, plus receive four e-books as a bonus.  The Illustra film Darwin’s Dilemma is also excellent on that point, and Illustra’s new film Flight: The Genius of Birds gives strong evidence for intelligent design of birds as opposed to Darwinian stories about dino-to-bird evolution.  A two-volume work by PhD geologist Andrew Snelling, Earth’s Catastrophic Past (read a review), shows with examples from around the world that the evolutionary millions-of-years story cannot stand up to the overwhelming geological evidence for a worldwide flood.last_img read more

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Remarkable Cell Processes That Keep You Alive

first_imgWithin the factories of molecular machines that run living cells, including those in the human body, processes occur non-stop that are designed to meet every contingency.  Here are just a few examples.Parking garage:  Most of us have driven round and round in those multi-level parking garages looking for a spot.  We have something like that in our cells, too: helical ramps within an organelle called the endoplasmic reticulum, where proteins are given final assembly and checkups before being put into operation.  Science Daily has a diagram of the structure.  Nature News described how it works the same way as a parking garage, allowing “for dense, adjustable packing of material in the cell, boosting the surface available for protein production within a small volume.”Brain tune-up:  To perform in concert, neurons in the brain occasionally need to tune their signals, like orchestra players tune their instruments.  Science Daily described how they do it: NIH findings show that “brief bursts of chemical energy coming from rapidly moving power plants, called mitochondria, may tune brain cell communication.”  About a third of mitochondria move along tracks in the axon.  Their presence seems to provide a reference tone, like a tuning fork, for signals: “the presence of stationary power plants at synapses controls the stability of the nerve signal strength.”Cell division conductors: Speaking of orchestra players, there wouldn’t be music without an orchestrator.  Centrioles are tiny bundles of microtubules located at the foci of mitotic spindles, the structures that pull chromosomes apart during cell division (mitosis).  They are always found in pairs perpendicular to each other.  PhysOrg discussed their “manifold functions in the cell,” including “orchestrators of cell division,” a “tightly regulated process.”  European biochemists investigated the mysterious “pericentriolar material” (PCM) that binds them into the “centrosome” where, in a still mysterious way, they winch the chromosomes into the daughter cells.  “Our results show that the PCM still harbors many surprises,” one of the researchers said.Damage repair team spirit:  A paper in PNAS describes what happens when lesions form on DNA strands, triggering “excision repair” processes.  The title describes what happens: “Homologous recombination rescues ssDNA gaps generated by nucleotide excision repair and reduced translesion DNA synthesis…”  The study, performed on yeast cells, describes cooperation between translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), single-stranded DNA repair (ssDNA), and homologous recombination, which rebuilds a damaged strand from the intact strand.  “These findings suggest that ssDNA that might originate during the repair of closely opposed lesions or of ssDNA-containing lesions or from uncoupled replication may drive recombination directly in various species, including humans.”Checkpoint charlies:  A technical paper in Science Magazine described the interactions of multiple players that use checkpoints to ensure genomic integrity.  The teams include proteins, small interfering RNAs, and multi-part enzymes.  These players are all involved in “DNA Replication Origin Firing in Human Cells,” i.e., making sure that the all-important task of replicating the genome begins at the right spot.  Here’s a taste of the technical details: “We propose that MTBP acts with Treslin/TICRR to integrate signals from cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways to control the initiation of DNA replication in human cells.”Master regulator:  A paper in Nature uncovers more findings about mTOR kinase, which it calls “a master regulator of cell growth.”  The opening paragraph describes why this enzyme is important:Whether or not a cell grows is decided by a remarkable protein kinase enzyme called mTOR. As part of two complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, mTOR integrates and interprets all sorts of factors that influence cell growth — including nutrients, stressors and the outputs of signal-transduction networks — by targeting a multitude of substrates that drive processes such as protein translation, metabolism and cell division. Research into mTOR-mediated signalling has taken on added urgency since it was discovered that most cancers contain mutations that inappropriately activate this protein.The newly-uncovered structure of mTOR, made up of 1,500 amino acids, shows that it has a “gatekeeper mechanism that controls substrate access to the active site.”You’re the boss:  As a functioning whole organism, you can tell your cells what to do.  An attention-getting paper in Nature states that “Attention enhances synaptic efficacy and the signal-to-noise ratio in neural circuits.”  In other words, when you focus your attention on a sight or sound, your neurons obey, all the way to the level of synapses between neurons.  “The results demonstrate that attention finely tunes neuronal communication at the synaptic level by selectively altering synaptic weights, enabling enhanced detection of salient events in the noisy sensory environment.”  Philosophers of free will, take note.Bricks that build:  Certain structural building blocks in the inner ear don’t just sit there.  They actually have a “starring role” to play, Science Daily reported in a surprise announcement.  “Researchers have found in mice that supporting cells in the inner ear, once thought to serve only a structural role, can actively help repair damaged sensory hair cells, the functional cells that turn vibrations into the electrical signals that the brain recognizes as sound.”Sex cooperation: Science Daily reported a “shocker,” a “surprising finding” that the female X-chromosome participates in sperm production.  One would think men and women are actually part of the same species after all.Where do we stop?  We could go on and on.  Every week in the science literature, new findings are made about regulators, teams, quality controls (see 7/16/13), checkpoints, conductors, players with starring roles – Michael Denton wasn’t kidding when back in 1985 (Evolution: A Theory in Crisis, p. 328) he compared a cell to a large city, filled with “supreme technology and bewildering complexity.”  That was almost 30 years ago; more discoveries have poured forth since then, many of them of paramount importance to our understanding of how life works.  It’s almost as if God, in His shrewd wisdom, has allowed biochemists to peer into the machinery, bit by bit, just as they were concluding their “evolution is a fact” speeches through their megaphones in the press.  It’s hard to see how Darwinian evolution can survive this never-ending onslaught of Design, design, design! emanating from the living cell as, week after week, year after year, improving technology brings its perfections into sharper focus. 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Will prevented planting play into markets?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCFriday’s USDA report confirmed what the market already knew. Near perfect growing conditions last year in the highest producing areas around the world has generated too much corn and soybean supply in the U.S and globally. Unfortunately, due to problems with the African Swine Fever in Asia and the China trade war, demand has decreased. And, it’s unlikely either will be resolved before the end of the year.Right now, the new crop market is likely overvalued, especially if most areas are planted on time and trend line yields are produced. But the big variable now is weather. Forecasts for the Dakotas and the eastern Corn Belt show a possible break in rain this week, but more rain is expected next weekend. This may mean farmers in those areas will wait for better planting conditions or take prevent plant. The Dakotas only have until May 25, and the eastern Corn Belt until June 5, before they have to declare if they are taking prevent plant on corn.Will farmers in these areas still plant? That is the billion-dollar question, and I don’t think the market has fully addressed this. Right now, economics suggest that farmers should NOT push to plant their crop, IF they haven’t applied nitrogen to fields yet, which many haven’t been able to do.Obviously, this goes against the long-held belief that a farmer needs to plant crops to make money. But essentially farmers right now are incentivized to NOT plant crops this year. The futures values for both corn and bean are certainly under the cost of production.What if a farmer doesn’t plant? Based upon conversations with crop insurance agents and farmers, depending on the average yield and insurance coverage purchased earlier this year, farmers could expect to receive around $300 to $400 per acre. In areas still dealing with excessive rain, these types of payments could cover a farmer’s cash rent payments and weed control costs for the rest of the year. A farmer also receives this money right away as to waiting until after harvest. This could help with cash flow issues and allow the unpriced farmer to store their grain until or even after harvest waiting for better prices.If a farmer does try to plant corn, it’s possible they could end up losing money for both any remaining unpriced corn in the bin and any unpriced new crop corn they are about to plant, if prices don’t go back up.Will farmers really not plant corn or will they just switch to beans? I think some farmers will minimize their farm operation’s risk and not plant corn this year. I don’t think many will switch crops. Bean prices need to increase at least $1 per bushel for farmers to just breakeven.Will farmers take prevent plant for beans? It’s hard to say yet. Bean prevent plant decision dates are about two weeks after the corn dates, so there is still too much time to know.If farmers are incentivized to NOT plant, will more be considering prevent plant? From what I understand, there doesn’t seem to be any hard rules for how the claims process works. Basically, the insurance companies determine if farmers could have planted in their area, so prevent plant isn’t necessarily a guaranteed payment to farmers. Still, there are a lot of areas that could be covered. Farmers should work with their crop insurance agents to determine if their area might be covered.So, how many corn acres will ultimately get planted? It’s hard to say at this point. While no two years are ever the same, 1995 had some historical similarities to current conditions. In 1995, the U.S. loss about 4 million corn acres from March planting intentions to the final acres planted. If we use the same type of acres at today’s yields it equals about 700 million bushels (4 million acres x 175 yield).A 700-million-bushel reduction to the 2.4-billion-bushel projected carryout (May USDA report) would leave 1.7 billion bushels, the tightest carryout since 2013.On the surface this sounds very bullish, but it really isn’t. If this happened and futures rallied more than 30 cents, export demand and ethanol grind would likely slow, ultimately increasing carryout. Plus, the wheat supply is also high with Kansas City futures below $4. Wheat could easily replace corn for feed in parts of the southern plains.Is there an upside? Yes, the national average yield in 1995 was 5 bushels per acre lower than trend-line, due to poor summer weather. In other words, the variability and unpredictability of weather can still be a big factor. If the summer weather is too wet, too much nitrogen could be leached from the soil. If the summer is too dry, corn root systems may be too shallow, which could compromise yield. Both of these scenarios could be the match that lights a fire under the markets.What’s next?The market will be waiting until May 25 to see how much of the Dakotas will take prevent plant and what the 10-day weather forecast for the eastern Corn Belt will be. It would be hard for me to plant corn unless there is optimal conditions in those areas if I had not yet applied nitrogen as there is a high potential for losing money at this point planting corn. If I thought a market rally was likely due to wet conditions, there are risk management tools available that would allow me to participate in a rally without actually putting seed in the ground.What about your farm? Our farm in southeast Nebraska missed much of the recent rains. We finished planting our corn and beans last week. Still, it’s been cool recently, so it’s uncertain if some areas will need to be replanted. Please email [email protected] with any questions or to learn more. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results.last_img read more

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Fever

first_imgDefinitionFever is the temporary increase in the bodys temperature in response to some disease or illness.A child has a fever when the temperature is at or above one of these levels:100.4 F (38 C) measured in the bottom (rectally)99.5 F(37.5 C) measured in the mouth (orally)99 F (37.2 C) measured under the arm (axillary)An adult probably has a fever when the temperature is above 99 – 99.5 F (37.2 – 37.5 C), depending on the time of day.See also:Heat emergenciesTemperature measurementAlternative NamesElevated temperature; Hyperthermia; PyrexiaConsiderationsNormal body temperature may change during any given day. It is usually highest in the evening. Other factors that may affect body temperature are:In the second part of a womans menstrual cycle, her temperature may go up by 1 degree or more.Physical activity, strong emotion, eating, heavy clothing, medications, high room temperature, and high humidity can all increase your body temperature.Fever is an important part of the bodys defense against infection. Most bacteria and viruses that cause infections in people thrive best at 98.6 F. Many infants and children develop high fevers with minor viral illnesses. Although a fever signals that a battle might be going on in the body, the fever is fighting for the person, not against.Brain damage from a fever generally will not occur unless the fever is over 107.6 F (42 C). Untreated fevers caused by infection will seldom go over 105 F unless the child is overdressed or trapped in a hot place.Febrile seizures do occur in some children. However, most febrile seizures are over quickly, do not mean your child has epilepsy, and do not cause any permanent harm..advertisementUnexplained fevers that continue for days or weeks are called fevers of undetermined origin (FUO).CausesAlmost any infection can cause a fever. Some common infections are:Infections such as pneumonia, bone infections (osteomyelitis), appendicitis, tuberculosis, skin infections or cellulitis, and meningitisRespiratory infections such as colds or flu -like illnesses, sore throats, ear infections, sinus infections, infectious mononucleosis, and bronchitisUrinary tract infectionsViral gastroenteritis and bacterial gastroenteritisChildren may have a low-grade fever for 1 or 2 days after some immunizations.Teething may cause a slight increase in a childs temperature, but not higher than 100 F.Autoimmune or inflammatory disorders may also cause fevers. Some examples are:Arthritis or connective tissue illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosusUlcerative colitis and Crohns diseaseVasculitis or periarteritis nodosaThe first symptom of a cancer may be a fever. This is especially true of Hodgkins disease, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and leukemia.Other possible causes of fever include:Blood clots or thrombophlebitisMedications, such as some antibiotics, antihistamines, and seizure medicinesHome CareA simple cold or other viral infection can sometimes cause a high fever (102 – 104 F, or 38.9 – 40 C). This does not usually mean you or your child have a serious problem. Some serious infections may cause no fever or even a very low body temperature, especially in infants.If the fever is mild and you have no other problems, you do not need treatment. Drink fluids and rest.The illness is probably not serious if your child:Is still interested in playingIs eating and drinking wellIs alert and smiling at youHas a normal skin colorLooks well when their temperature comes downTake steps to lower a fever if you or your child is uncomfortable, vomiting, dried out (dehydrated), or not sleeping well. Remember, the goal is to lower, not eliminate, the fever.When trying to lower a fever:Do NOT bundle up someone who has the chills.Remove excess clothing or blankets. The room should be comfortable, not too hot or cool. Try one layer of lightweight clothing, and one lightweight blanket for sleep. If the room is hot or stuffy, a fan may help.A lukewarm bath or sponge bath may help cool someone with a fever. This is especially effective after medication is given — otherwise the temperature might bounce right back up.Do NOT use cold baths, ice, or alcohol rubs. These cool the skin, but often make the situation worse by causing shivering, which raises the core body temperature.Here are some guidelines for taking medicine to lower a fever:Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) help reduce fever in children and adults. Sometimes doctors advise you to use both types of medicine.Take acetaminophen every 4 – 6 hours. It works by turning down the brains thermostat.Take ibuprofen every 6 – 8 hours. DO NOT use ibuprofen in children younger than 6 months old.Aspirin is very effective for treating fever in adults. DO NOT give aspirin to a child unless your childs doctor tells you to.Know how much you or your child weighs, and then always check the instructions on the package.In children under age 3 months, call your doctor first before giving medicines.Eating and drinking with a fever:advertisementEveryone, especially children, should drink plenty of fluids. Water, popsicles, soup, and gelatin are all good choices.Do not give too much fruit or apple juice and avoid sports drinks in younger children.Although eating foods with a fever is fine, do not force foods.When to Contact a Medical ProfessionalCall a doctor right away if your child:Is younger than 3 months old and has a rectal temperature of 100.4 F (38 C) or higherIs 3 -12 months old and has a fever of 102.2 F (39 C) or higherIs under age 2 and has a fever that lasts longer than 24 – 48 hoursIs older and has a fever for longer than 48 – 72 hoursHas a fever over 105 F (40.5 C), unless it comes down readily with treatment and the person is comfortableHas other symptoms that suggest an illness may need to be treated, such as a sore throat, earache, or coughHas been having fevers come and go for up to a week or more, even if they are not very highHas a serious medical illness, such as a heart problem, sickle cell anemia, diabetes, or cystic fibrosisRecently had an immunizationHas a new rash or bruises appearHas pain with urinationHas trouble with the immune system (chronic steroid therapy, after a bone marrow or organ transplant, spleen was removed, is HIV-positive, or is being treated for cancer)Has recently traveled to a third world countryCall 911 if you or your child has a fever and:Is crying and cannot be calmed down (children)Cannot be awakened easily or at allSeems confusedCannot walkHas difficulty breathing, even after their nose is clearedHas blue lips, tongue, or nailsHas a very bad headacheHas a stiff neckRefuses to move an arm or leg (children)Has a seizureCall your doctor right away if you are an adult and you:Have a fever over 105 F (40.5 C), unless it comes down readily with treatment and you are comfortableHave a fever that stays at or keeps rising above 103 FHave a fever for longer than 48 – 72 hoursHave had fevers come and go for up to a week or more, even if they are not very highHave a serious medical illness, such as a heart problem, sickle cell anemia, diabetes, cystic fibrosis, COPD, or other chronic lung problemsHave a new rash or bruises appearHave pain with urinationHave trouble with your immune system (chronic steroid therapy, after a bone marrow or organ transplant, had spleen removed, HIV-positive, were being treated for cancer)Have recently traveled to a third world countryWhat to Expect at Your Office VisitYour doctor will perform a physical examination, which may include a detailed examination of the skin, eyes, ears, nose, throat, neck, chest, and abdomen to look for the cause of the fever.Treatment depends on the duration and cause of the fever, as well as your other symptoms.advertisementThe following tests may be performed:Blood studies, such as a CBC or blood differentialUrinalysisX-ray of the chestReferencesMick NW. Pediatric fever. In: Marx JA, ed. Rosens Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Mosby Elsevier; 2009:chap 165.Leggett J. Approach to fever or suspected infection in the normal host. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldmans Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 288.Review Date:2/1/2012Reviewed By:Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.last_img read more

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a month agoChelsea No1 Kepa: I don’t bother with nerves

first_imgChelsea No1 Kepa: I don’t bother with nervesby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea No1 Kepa Arrizabalaga admits nerves do not affect him.Kepa says he rarely feels pressure ahead of a match, whatever the stage and whoever the opponents, instead focusing on his love of the game in the moments building up to kick-off.”I’m not really a person that is prone to anxiety, or feeling nervous,” he told chelseafc.com. “I generally don’t feel that way before a game. What I always think is, at the end of the day, it’s football – that’s what it is – and football is what we do, it’s what we like, and it’s what we enjoy.”Of course, when there are really important games there is a bit more tension, a bit more adrenaline, but I wouldn’t call it nervousness.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Helena Woods story A journey to healing

first_imgBrittany HobsonKaryn PuglieseAPTN NewsEight years ago a family tragedy changed Helena Wood’s life forever, and set the course for a nearly decade-long journey of healing and recovery.On Feb. 26, 2010 Helena’s 15-year-old daughter Cassandra Wood died by suicide in their home community of St. Theresa Point. Her body was found a day later in a garage near the community’s high school. Helena believes witnessing years of domestic violence in the home was too much for Cassandra.“I’m not going to go through this again. I’m not going to lose another daughter because of him,” she told APTN News. “He doesn’t matter to me. What matters is my kid’s future. Giving them the best life I could possibly give them.In August 2010, six months after Cassandra’s death, Helena fled to Winnipeg with her kids. She called a local shelter asking for help getting the family. St. Theresa Point is a remote community in northern Manitoba. During the summer it is only accessible by plane and in the winter people can drive in and out via a winter road. The shelter paid for Helena and her kids to be flown to Winnipeg.She eventually settled in community of Steinbach located 58 km southeast of Winnipeg.It is here where she had to face some harsh realities when it came to her daughter.“I regret not knowing her. Even though she was reaching out to me I turned her away because of the domestic violence,” she said from her home in Steinbach.“I was too much concentrating on my abuse. Trying to survive every day.”Helena and Cassandra’s father began dating while they were in high school. Helena became pregnant with Cassandra at the age of 16. She married Cassandra’s father when she was 18. The violence started early on in their relationship. APTN has decided not to publish his name at Helena’s request.APTN obtained a copy of a special investigative report done by Manitoba’s Children’s Advocate Office outlining events leading up to and after Cassandra’s death.According to the report Island Lake First Nations Family Services (ILFNFS) first intervened in December 2008 when Cassandra told local health workers she didn’t want to go home because of the violence. Helena and Cassandra’s father met with ILFNFS, health services and justice representatives. They were concerned marital problems were affecting the children.The agency was supposed to follow up the next week but there is no documentation indicating that meeting took place, according to the report.In September 2009 Cassandra went to live with her maternal grandparents because of the violence. She remained there off and on until her death.With the abuse came the drinking. Helena use alcohol to cope with the abuse. She says it helped numb her feelings. That dependency followed her, but this time she was drinking to deal with Cassandra’s death.Cassandra’s siblings, Jewel and Austin Wood, were trying cope with their sister’s death. Their relationship with Helena began to deteriorate because of Helena’s addictions. Helena contacted child and family services hoping to get counseling for her kids and herself. The agency responded by apprehending the kids. Jewel decided to move back to St. Theresa Point to live with her father. Austin was placed in another home.For Helena that was her rock bottom. She worked tirelessly to get her kids back. She wrote three letters to the agency pleading for help to kick her addictions. In one she wrote, “I feel like I’ve been mistreated and victimized by the system again. And yet that was the whole point I came down here to get the proper help I need for me and my children. Instead just got ignored and being misunderstood.”After submitting the letters to the agency she was assigned a new caseworker. She was finally told the kids would be returned if she got clean.“I went to the emergency. I wanted to quit on my own but I knew I couldn’t because of my body. Then I went to the crisis stabilization unit over there,” said Helena.Doctors told her symptoms from withdrawal could be fatal if she quit cold turkey.It’s been eight years since Helena left the community. She has now been sober for nearly two years. She credits her sobriety to the support of her parents, a strong group of friends and rediscovering her faith.“I go to church and I go to a bible study group. I call them my family but they’re my friends. That’s where my help is and that’s how I finally healed,” she said.Both Jewel and Austin have since aged out of the child welfare system. Two years ago Jewel gave birth to Helena’s first grandchild – a baby boy named Anthony. Last summer Jewel and Anthony moved to Steinbach to live with Helena. Shortly after Austin followed.Helena Wood, far right, with her daughter Jewel Wood and son Austin Wood.It may have taken six years but Helena finally has her family back. Much of her focus has been staying clean and in control of her life.“There’s times I want to quit because it’s exhausting. But when I have times like that I look at my kids. I have to go on for these children,” said Helena. “My grandson I look at him and [wonder] who’s going to take care of him. I have to make a safer, brighter future for him.”When Helena is plagued with doubt or exhaustion she leans on Marlene Schindler for support. The two met shortly after Helena arrived in Steinbach and have remained close since. Schindler watched as Helena worked on rebuilding her life.“She can look her kids in the face and never be ashamed because she did what she could do and did it to the best of her ability and she never quit,” said Schindler.Approximately 10 per cent of the population in Steinbach identifies as Indigenous, according to a 2016 census report. Many Indigenous foster kids are being placed in non-Indigenous homes.Helena saw this and decided to team up with the Steinbach Arts Council to facilitate workshops on traditional culture. She invited foster families and members from the community to a tea and bannock event last fall. It is here where she spoke openly about Cassandra’s death for the first time.Helena wants to tell people about her losses and what she has learned from her past.She also hopes the events can keep kids connected to their culture.“I know what’s going on in the system. I see a lot of foster kids here,” Helena told APTN after the event. “They’re lost and there’s nothing here. What are they going to learn? They need a sense of belonging.”Helena Wood making bannock at an event she recently organized.This is all volunteer work. Helena says physical pain from the years of abuse prevent her from working full-time. She has chronic back pain and cannot stand for long periods of time.She is also living with post-traumatic stress disorder. Every time she goes to swallow something her throat closes up and she begins to choke. Solid foods are now blended together to form a puree.Helena says doctors have ruled out any permanent damage. She now must re-train her body and brain on how to eat.While she cannot work right now, Helena longs for more.“I want to be a therapist,” said Helena. “I want to go back to school. That’s my next step.”She has her sights set on Providence University College – a Christian university located in the rural community of Otterburne, Man. There’s still some logistics to work out like paying for the schooling and transportation, but with this goal in mind Helena feels she finally on the right path.Judy Klassen has been by Helena’s side since before the abuse started. The two are cousins but in their culture they refer to each other as sisters. Klassen sheltered Helena and her kids when they first arrived in Steinbach. She sees Helena’s journey as a story of redemption and victory.“To see her still standing there. Still trying to take care of her kids. To be still standing it’s quite an accomplishment,” said Klassen.Helena wants to educate others about domestic violence. Part of that includes honouring Cassandra’s life and what it could have been.From her home in Steinbach she imagines Cassandra would have gotten married and started a family after she graduated high school.Earlier this month Helena visited the spot where Cassandra’s body was found in St. Theresa Point. She has visited this site a handful of times since her death.But, this time is different. This time she is ready to move forward.“I have accepted it. I wasn’t ready to face it but now I am.”[email protected]last_img read more

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CEO lawyer granted bail pending appeal in blockbuster Knowledge House fraud

first_imgHALIFAX – The mastermind and the enforcer of a sophisticated multimillion-dollar stock market scheme have been granted bail, a day after being sentenced to prison for conspiracy and fraud in one of the most complex cases of white collar crime in Nova Scotia history.Daniel Potter, the former CEO of the defunct tech firm Knowledge House, and former lawyer Blois Colpitts were released Thursday pending the outcome of an appeal.The disgraced executives were found guilty in March of conspiracy to manipulate the firm’s share price and carrying out fraudulent activities in a regulated securities market.Nova Scotia Court of Appeal Justice Cindy Bourgeois signed the bail orders after imposing multiple conditions, including requiring them to hand over their passports, remain in the country and report weekly to police.They have also each entered into a recognizance in the amount of $100,000, with family friends agreeing to act as sureties.The businessmen, who appeared somewhat weary after a night in jail, agreed to the release conditions.Crown attorney James Martin told the court Potter and Colpitts did not pose a flight risk, and that there was no concern they would commit further offences.On Wednesday, Nova Scotia Supreme Court Justice Kevin Coady sentenced Potter, 66, to five years and Colpitts, 55, to 4 1/2 years.In his decision, the judge said “there is virtually no risk that either Mr. Potter or Mr. Colpitts will reoffend.”Meanwhile, the court set aside eight days in September 2019 for the appeal, though the matter is expected to return to court on Aug. 23 of this year to deal with procedural issues in the complicated case.Defence lawyer Jane O’Neill asked if the appeal book, which would include a transcript of the 44-day trial and all the documentary evidence, could be submitted in an electronic format.“The trial transcripts alone are 22,000 pages, the exhibits are in the tens of thousands of pages,” she told the court, adding that — given several hard copies would be required — “I’m not sure there’s enough real estate in this building to hold all of those books.”The trial began in November 2015 and heard from 75 witnesses over more than 160 court days, and 184 exhibits were received including thousands of documents.The jail terms handed down to Potter and Colpitts this week came nearly 17 years after the e-learning company’s dramatic collapse.Knowledge House, the once high-flying Halifax technology darling, developed software the company promised would revolutionize the elementary, high school and post-secondary education systems.The co-conspirators used multiple manipulative techniques to prop up the firm’s share price, including using margin accounts to dominate the buy-side of the market, suppressing sales and “high closing” the stock, or entering orders late in the trading day to boost the closing share price.“Mr. Potter was the silver-tongued mastermind, the architect of the conspiracy, who exerted his influence to manipulate and control other shareholders,” Coady said in his decision.“He dictated who could sell shares, when they could sell, and how much they could sell.”Meanwhile, the judge described Colpitts as “the enforcer” who used his position as counsel “to threaten legal action against anyone who might derail the conspirators’ efforts.”Coady said Colpitts provided legal advice in support of the conspiracy as well as negotiated investment deals and prepared legal documentation knowing that the market price for Knowledge House was being manipulated.The tech company traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange before what the judge described as “the house of cards” collapsed in August 2001, sending Knowledge House stock plummeting to 33 cents a share from $5.10.Though the Crown had estimated the fraud was about $86 million, Coady said he would not put a specific dollar figure on the scheme, instead calling it a “large scale multimillion-dollar fraud.”last_img read more

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No Federal funding included in Budget to help the Oil and Gas

first_imgCALGARY, A.B. – Oilpatch observers say there is nothing in the new federal budget to deal with Canada’s competitive disadvantage with the United States in oil and gas.Statistics Canada says capital spending to extract oil and gas will fall for a fourth straight year, with the biggest declines projected to be in the oilsands sector.Hardest hit will be Alberta, but spending will also be down in Newfoundland and Labrador, B.C. and Saskatchewan. CIBC economist Avery Shenfeld says the numbers are falling because big projects are wrapping up and not being replaced.He says companies are seeing bottlenecks in the ability to get a product to the market and a lighter regulatory environment in the U.S.Ottawa says more analysis is necessary before considering tax cuts to match the U-S, which announced in December it would drop its federal corporate tax rate to 21 percent from 35 percent.University of Calgary tax expert Jack Mintz says Canada had a tax advantage over the U-S until recently but that has evaporated.(THE CANADIAN PRESS)last_img read more

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