Wellington Police Notes: Monday, Sept. 21, 2015

first_imgWellington Police notes: Monday, September 21, 2015:•8:00 a.m. Officers took a report of suspicious A=activity in the 1700 block E. 16th, Wellington.•8:57 a.m. Officers took a report of a found wallet in the 1600 block E. 16th, Wellington. It was returned to the owner.•10:52 a.m. Officers took a report of a found bicycle in the 1200 block N. A, Wellington.•11:10 a.m. Non-Injury accident in the 900 block E. U.S. 160, Wellington involving vehicles operated by Larry J. Church, 71, Wellington and Monty L. Troutman, 63, Wellington.•11:30 a.m. Larry J. Church, 71, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for inattentive driving.•5:32 p.m. Officers investigated theft of a lawn mower in the 2000 block of N H.   •8:12 p.m. Officers investigated suspicious activity in the 300 block of E 8th.•8:22 p.m. Officers conducted a welfare check in the 800 block of E. 7th.last_img read more

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Darwin Plagiarized Patrick Matthew

first_imgDarwin had to acknowledge that his ideas were anticipated by several others, including Patrick Matthew, by decades.Dr. Michael Weale is trying to set the record straight on Darwin. In this press release from King’s College London, Weale points to horticulturist Patrick Matthew (1790-1874) as the “overlooked third man” along with Darwin and Wallace to conceive of natural selection as a law of macroevolutionary change. Matthew’s term was “natural process of selection” and was described in his 1831 book, On Naval Timber and Arboriculture, 27 years before Darwin’s Origin. Here is the concept in Matthew’s words:“There is a law universal in nature, tending to render every reproductive being the best possibly suited to its condition that its kind, or that organized matter, is susceptible of, which appears intended to model the physical and mental or instinctive powers, to their highest perfection, and to continue them so. This law sustains the lion in his strength, the hare in her swiftness, and the fox in his wiles.”  (Matthew, 1831: 364).Matthew wrote Darwin a few months after The Origin came out. Wallace also acknowledged Matthew’s priority. Weale says,In 1860, Matthew wrote to point out the parallels with his prior work, several months after the publication of On the origin of species.  Darwin publically wrote in 1860 “I freely acknowledge that Mr. Matthew has anticipated by many years the explanation which I have offered of the origin of species”, while Wallace wrote publically in 1879 of “how fully and clearly Mr. Matthew apprehended the theory of natural selection, as well as the existence of more obscure laws of evolution, many years in advance of Mr. Darwin and myself”, and further declared Matthew to be “one of the most original thinkers of the first half of the 19th century”.  However, both asserted their formulations were independent of Matthew’s.In the 3rd and subsequent editions of The Origin, Darwin, under pressure from critics, included a new Introduction acknowledging predecessors who had conceived of ideas similar to natural selection. “The differences of Mr. Matthew’s view from mine are not of much importance,” he said. Darwin pointed out some worldview differences, such as Matthew’s notion that the world underwent several periods of depopulation and restocking from vegetable matter. “He clearly saw, however, the full force of the principle of natural selection,” adding that he had responded earlier in a letter, “fully acknowledging that Mr. Matthew had anticipated me.” Matthew had written with “gracious candor” to Darwin, apparently deferring that Darwin had worked it out with more rigor than he had.But that’s not the whole story. Matthew had gotten under Darwin’s skin for a time. Darwin biographer Janet Browne describes the aftermath of Darwin’s bombshell 1859 book:During those early months, several people claimed to have thought of natural selection first. Patrick Matthew, an obscure but fiery political writer, wrote to the London magazines to draw attention to his book Naval Timber and Arboriculture, published in 1831, in which he had indeed described the mechanism of natural selection…. He [Darwin] took steps to deal with this source of possible controversy quickly and cleanly. He wrote a brief response for publication and made his excuses politely. The last thing he wanted was another priority dispute. Undaunted, Matthew capitalized on the connection for several years afterwards, much to Darwin’s private irritation. (Browne: Darwin: The Power of Place, pp. 108-109).In The Dark Side of Charles Darwin, Jerry Bergman mentions the Patrick Matthew controversy. He quotes Stephen Jay Gould who had noted that Matthew wrote Darwin “to express his frustration at Darwin’s non-citation” of his work. Bergman continues, “In response to Matthew’s evidently valid concern, Darwin merely ‘offered some diplomatic palliation in the historical introduction added to later editions of the Origin.’” To Bergman, Darwin’s first response letter to Matthew in April 1860 “indicates Darwin’s guilt” in the affair. Darwin may not have known of Matthew (see Sutton, below), but once the word got out, “it does not justify the slight Matthew was given ever since.”Weale is aware that Edward Blyth also conceived of a similar operative principle in nature, but notes that to Blyth and others, natural selection was a conservative process set up by the Creator. “Prior to Matthew, the principle of natural selection had been applied as an almost anti-evolutionary concept, as a process that kept species in their place,” he explains. Patrick Matthew, in contrast to Blyth, extended the principle to macroevolutionary change. For that, Weale considers Patrick Matthew to be “the first person known to have proposed natural selection as a mechanism for the origin of species (macroevolution).” Weale has set up a public website called The Patrick Matthew Project to accumulate all the known publications, letters, and biographies of Matthew. Readers wishing to investigate this issue of priority now have access to Matthew’s personal letters to Darwin, and other pertinent documents.Last year in The Daily Journalist, Dr. Mike Sutton documented evidence that Darwin and his friends were aware of Matthew’s ideas before the Origin. Sutton calls this “A Bombshell for the History of Discovery and Priority in Science.”To date, there has been no hard evidence to prove that Darwin’s or Wallace’s work was influenced by Matthew. However, newly discovered literature reveals seven naturalists cited Matthew’s book before 1858. Three played key pre-1858 roles facilitating and influencing Darwin’s and Wallace’s published ideas on natural selection. They are: Loudon – who edited and published Blyth’s acknowledged influential articles on evolution; Chambers, author of the ‘Vestiges of Creation’ –  which both Darwin and Wallace also acknowledged influenced their work; and Selby – who, in 1855, edited and published Wallace’s Sarawak paper. These new discoveries mean that Matthew now has full scientific priority for the theory natural selection.So why do we speak of Darwinism, and not Matthewism?A number of excuses for crediting Darwin over Matthew are offered at Weale’s website: (a) Darwin had come upon the mechanism independently (although Weale acknowledges the possibility Darwin was aware of Matthew’s priority; see bullet #6 on Weale); (b) Darwin was the better scientist; (c) Darwin spent more time developing the idea, etc. But one possibility not discussed is that maybe Patrick Matthew’s ideas were not naturalistic enough.  On the “Recurrent Themes” page, Weale says:Matthew believed in a purposeful, designed, anthropocentric universe [bold in original here only]. This was already clear from a letter that Matthew wrote to Darwin in 1871 (when Matthew was 80), but it was unclear whether this might have been a late-in-life conversion. Wells (1973) argued that this world view extended to Matthew’s younger life, based on scattered references to a “benevolent Providence” and “we never see a provision of nature without a sufficient reason” contained in Emigration Fields (1839, pp. 4, 123, 217), and also to references to variation in nature being for an “apparent use” and to life under natural selection displaying “unity of design” in On Naval Timber and Arboriculture (1831, Excerpts 4 and 2). One might excuse these latter comments as shorthand for “use to natural selection” and “body plan”. However, I have now found a new article from 1849 that also contains a reference to a competitive spirit “implanted for wise ends” in human nature, and several articles from 1860-61 that endorse the idea that Matthew’s world view was consistent and purposeful throughout his life, as befits a man of strong conviction.There appears to be a mystical or vitalistic streak in Matthew’s world view that would be unacceptable to today’s evolutionists. But that fact should not disqualify his priority. Wallace, similarly, accepted spiritualism to some extent, and as Michael Flannery has documented, believed in a version of intelligent design, particularly for the origin of human intelligence and reason. There is no question, however, that Darwin’s view was wholly mechanistic. Perhaps that is the main reason Darwin’s name has been synonymous with evolution ever since, with a little help from the P.R. tactics of his X-Men, Thomas Huxley, Asa Gray and Charles Lyell (see 3/03/08).Read Bergman’s book, and Browne’s excellent biography of Darwin, to see how Charlie was a scheming scoundrel. Then read Darwin Day in America to contemplate the wreckage Darwin’s earthquake produced in the entire intellectual culture for the next century and a half, right up to the present day.But lest we give the impression that Matthew, Darwin, Wallace or any of the lot deserve credit for some great scientific discovery, we remind our readers that “natural selection” is a restatement of the “Stuff Happens Law” (SHL) a vacuous, unscientific “empty set” of a theory if there ever was one. It is not a law of nature. It is the abandonment of scientific explanation. Why? Because mutations are due to chance (stuff happens), and the environment is blind and unconcerned for what living things do (stuff happens). Neither “selects” anything. If you add chance to chance, what do you get? Chance! And if your scientific explanation amounts to chance, you have simply thrown up your hands, and said, “Stuff happens.” That is the opposite of science. Giving the SHL a catchy name like “natural selection” is a mere fig leaf over a naked concept. So who cares if Matthew thought of it first? Imagine the debate: “I said Stuff Happens in 1831” Matthew complains. “No, I thought of Stuff Happens independently!” Darwin responds. What a bunch of know-nothings.For support that this is indeed the case, read what William Dembski says in his new book, Being as Communion (2014). After quoting Richard Dawkins’s bluff about natural selection being nonrandom, Dembski responds:Dawkins’s attempt to minimize the role of chance in evolution is misleading. The fact remains that the creative potential for Darwinian processes come from variations: “Unless profitable variations do occur,” noted Darwin, “natural selection can do nothing.” But, within Darwinism, any such profitable variations are random (for instance, within neo-Darwinism, variations result from genetic copying errors). Moreover, given Dawkins’s materialism, these variations must be sifted through a selection process that itself is the result of accidental forces of nature. To say that selection is nonrandom is therefore like saying that once a die is cast and has landed, the face that appears is nonrandom. True enough, but getting there certainly involved a good deal of randomness, and the same holds for natural selection if materialism is true. (Dembski, p. 142).This agrees with our claim that “natural selection” is all about chance, and if a scientific explanation offers nothing but chance, it is equivalent to saying “stuff happens.” This means that Darwin, Wallace, Matthew—the whole lot of them—are nothing but “empty talkers and deceivers” (Titus 1:10). Should any of these “waterless clouds, swept along by winds” (Jude 12) be celebrated for explaining God’s green Earth without God? (Visited 154 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Tigerair Review

first_imgI admit to being the biggest budget traveller. I do love luxury but seeing the cheapest flight always gets me pushing the ‘book now’ button quicker than I can say “What about Virgin Australia or Qantas?”. That is why on routes, such as Perth to Melbourne, Tigerair are usually my go to. With flights often for less than $200 one way they sure have me hooked. I remember one time I snagged a flight for $99! Now that had me smiling from ear-to-ear.My regular line when I get off my flight with Tigerair is “I am never flying them again” but I do. As I said the price is just too tempting for a stingy budget traveller like me.WARNING: Some of the following information may be disturbing to Business Class travellers!Seat and amenitiesThe seating is definitely tight. With a seat pitch of 28/29 inches things can get uncomfortable. Lucky for me I’m a mere 5 feet 2 inches but the poor man next to me who was about 6 foot really struggled! Exit-row seats have a 38/39 inch pitch so will definitely be a little more comfortable. My thought is by the time you pay extra for the exit-row you may as well just fly a different airline.Customer service on boardSo you might arrive at your seat ready for battle with airline staff. After all they are a budget airline so wouldn’t they skimp on their service too? However this is where I believe Tigerair take things up a notch. Staff are friendly and even assist with putting your bags in the overhead lockers. Unlike some airlines, staff members are not dismissive and don’t rush through cabin service.CateringFood and drinks, including tea, coffee and water are available for purchase. Their menu even pokes fun at Qantas celebrity chef Neil Perry. Written on the menu it says, “Our new Tigerair menu is not designed by Neil Perry or served on designer plates, but that means it doesn’t cost $25 for a sandwich”. I don’t know about you but I sure like their sense of humour!Inflight entertainmentApart from an inflight magazine don’t expect much else in the form of entertainment. Be prepared with something to do during your flight or you might find yourself counting sheep.Hints and tips 1. Don’t be late! For those who have been in the unfortunate situation of running late for your flight with Tigerair you would have learnt the hard way! The airline offers no sympathy to late arrivals, no matter what the excuse is. Arrive a second later then 45 minutes before your flights scheduled departure and they won’t let you board. You can now avoid this stress by checking in on-line and heading straight to the boarding gate around 30 minutes before departure but remember if you have bags to check in you still must be at the airport in plenty of time to ensure your bags are dropped off before the 45 minute cut off.2. Check that they are actually they cheapest! Baggage allowance and food are never included in the initial booking price. If you are purchasing these extra add-ons make sure you shop around! Sometimes you might find a competitive flight with a full service carrier. However, if you want to be cheap like me, I bring my own food, a book to keep me entertained and pack light so I can just take carry-on.3. Don’t exceed your baggage allowance! Whilst standing in line to wait to check-in I have seen people being pulled aside by airline staff because their baggage weighs too much. You can tell as they are scrambling through their suitcase thinking about what items they can ditch, or better still add to their current outfit so it’s not measured in their bags weight. It’s not just check-in bags they are strict with, but also carry-ons. For carry-on you are allowed what I believe is a quite generous 10kg. This weight can be spread out between two pieces of carry-on luggage provided that each does not exceed the dimensions of 54cm X 38cm X 23cm. Excess baggage charges start at a whopping $20 a kilogram.4. Expect the unexpected! I have found that not only is Tigerair itself definitely a budget airline but their services outside the plane are too. The terminal is a budget terminal and lacks the shops and eateries that one might be used to. Having said this the Melbourne Airport terminal (T4) that Tigerair uses is being completely redeveloped and is under construction currently. Around this time next year the airline will be operating out of a brand new dedicated low cost terminal in Melbourne which will greatly improve the customer experience at check in and arrivals.The verdict Love them or hate them I will give them one thing, they are cheap. Just don’t expect any frills!last_img read more

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Midmar Mile stars up for awards

first_imgVote ‘A pleasure’Considering her time taking part in the event, she added: “It is so well organised and it has really been a pleasure for me to be there year after year for 15 years.” Lorna Cochran, the oldest ever finisher of the world’s largest open water swimming event, South Africa’s Midmar Mile, and Wayne Riddin, the long-time organiser of the event, have been nominated for the World Open Water Swimming Association’s Woman and Man of the Year Awards. 31 October 2013 “Nothing I have seen comes anywhere near the Midmar Mile,” Sam Greetham, a member of swimming world’s governing body Fina’s open water swimming technical committee, said when he visited South Africa in 2005. In typically humble fashion, she quickly turned the focus to Riddin, saying: “Tell him ‘well done’, he deserves it.” Her nomination, shown below, sums up the Grand Old Lady of the Midmar Mile: To vote for Cochran and Riddin, visit the Wowsa website He constantly re-invests in the sport of swimming; he envisions a bright future in the sport and then creates an environment to make it a reality. Wayne Riddin, Midmar Mile Miracle (South Africa) Riddin, by the way, won the second and third editions of the Midmar Mile, which this year celebrated its 40th anniversary. His nomination reads: Labour of loveFor Wayne Riddin, who was head coach of the South African swimming team in Sydney, the world’s largest open water swimming event remains an ongoing labour of love as he continually tweaks it, aiming to improve it each and every year, even though it has been acknowledged to be the world’s leading open water even by some distance. The aQuelle Midmar Mile takes place on 8 and 9 February 2014. A significant fund-raiser for charities, it is an event for everyone and participants include swimmers with multiple disabilities through to Olympic champions and world record holders. Cochran, who swam the Midmar Mile in February at the age of 89, turned 90 in July. She remains fit and active and was thrilled to hear the news of her nomination, which came as a huge surprise. ‘Amazed’“I am always amazed [to be nominated] when you look at the people that I have been nominated with,” he laughed when assessing his own nomination. center_img She is a late bloomer to the sport who is cheered on by her seven children, 24 grandchildren, 25 great-grandchildren, and numerous respectful fans. For his visionary innovation and aquapreneurial drive, for his constant commitment to give back to the sport of swimming, for his leadership in creating the most extravagant, wholesome open water swimming event, Wayne Riddin is a worthy nominee for the 2013 Wowsa Open Water Swimming Man of the Year. Lorna Cochran, Near-nonagenarian Navigates Nirvana (South Africa) In 2011, Steve Munatones, who was also on the Fina open water swimming technical committee, was blown away by his first visit to the event. “It sets the worldwide bar in every category,” he proclaimed. “Being in the top 15 nominations is not just about winning, but it’s about being recognised for what I have put in and just to be among those 15 is good enough. I was a bit overwhelmed when I saw the people, who are actually racing and winning in the Olympics. I don’t do it for that, but it is an honour.” For her passion for healthful living, for her continued participation in the world’s largest competitive race, for the example of healthful, meaningful living she represents, Lorna Cochran is a worthy nominee for the 2013 World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year. He attracts 18 000 swimmers in a variety of amateur, charity, disabled and elite competitions in South Africa where there are only 6,000 competitive pool swimmers. At the age of 89, Lorna Cochran shows the joys and benefits of open water swimming as clearly anyone on the planet. She emerges from the open water with a smile as wide and bright as can be. She is gracious to all, she is eloquent with the media. The race director for the Midmar Mile does so much for the sport in his native South Africa. From timing systems to celebrities, from seeding events to hot spots, from aerial coverage to car give-aways, Riddin has set the highest standards in the sport. It has been a busy year for Cochran and, she admitted, she has not yet done any training for the 2014 Midmar Mile. However, she indicated that another swim was not out of the question. “I do intend to try, at least,” she said. “I won’t make any predictions at this stage. If I do swim, I will be very pleased, but it is just a matter of wait and see.” After she started competing in South Africa’s aQuelle Midmar Mile at 74, she kept on competing year after year – proving that some things do get better with age. A short and free registration is required to ensure to ensure that people vote only once in each category. “She really deserves it for what she has done,” Riddin said of Cochran’s nomination. last_img read more

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Victoria Memorial to host exhibition on Jallianwala Bagh

first_imgVictoria Memorial Hall, a symbol of the grandeur of the colonial era, will for the first time host an exhibition on what is considered the worst blot on the British Empire, the Jallianwala Bagh massacre of 1919.The installation exhibition titled, ‘Ways of Remembering Jallianwala Bagh & Rabindranath Tagore’s Response to the Massacre’ is unique not only because it links Punjab and Bengal almost 100 years after the killings but because of the venue hosting it. It was only a couple of years after the massacre that Victoria Memorial was opened to the public in 1921 and this is the first time that the hall is holding some event around the killings. “It was a conscious choice to approach the Victoria Memorial Hall and we are happy that they agreed,” Sarmistha Dutta Gupta, a Kolkata based scholar and writer who is curating the exhibition, told The Hindu. “The VMH and Ministry of Culture are providing full support for putting up the installation,” she added.Ms. Dutta Gupta said that the exhibition was not about providing information to people as to what happened on April 13, 1919, but to place it in context. “There is something called the politics of memory. This installation is to question our forgetfulness around many significant facets of this episode in our history,” she remarked.In Bengal, the response to the massacre was not limited to a letter by Tagore to Viceroy Chelmsford on May 31, 1919, giving up his knighthood. Tagore engaged with the atrocities in Punjab in a major way in 1919-20 till the matter was discussed in the British Parliament. His letters with C.F. Andrews and other public figures and various other kinds of archival documents have been used in the installation. Ms. Dutta Gupta is collaborating with Sanchayan Ghosh, who teaches at Kala Bhawan Santiniketan, for the artistic direction of the installation and both of them travelled to Punjab to trace local memories around the massacre. “We are using oral narratives recorded in the form of videos of families who were directly affected by the massacre,” she said. “We have also explored parts of the city of Amritsar that faced brutally racist martial law orders like the Crawling Order and traced the changing meanings of the Jallianwala Bagh site for local people,” she added.Jayanta Sengupta, the secretary and curator of VMH, said that the museum was amenable to any kind of interpretations and looking forward to the exhibition.“Museums across the world are using their space creatively,” observed Mr. Sengupta. “For Victoria Memorial Hall, with all the symbolism around it of being a museum of the Empire, we are looking forward to the exhibition,” he said. Underlining the fact that Victoria Memorial was created to showcase the best of the empire, while the exhibition is on the greatest act of colonial violence, the VMH curator, however, clarified that the endeavour “is not an attempt to send out any political message”. Also, Mr. Sengupta is looking forward to the fact that this exhibition, unlike most others held in its galleries, would provide a three-dimensional experience to the audience.The exhibition would be an “ immersive installation” providing a multisensory experience to the visitors through video and audio tools, Mr. Ghosh said, elaborating that there would be a soundscape with poems by Subhadhra Kumari Chauhan, Nanak Singh and other poets and readings from fiction by Saadat Hasan Manto, Krishan Chunder and others. Besides photographs and archival material, the exhibition would also record how newspapers and periodicals in Bengal, both in English and Bengali, responded to the massacre.The exhibition, scheduled for later this year, will be held for almost six weeks at the VMH and the creators are keen to take it to Viswa Bharati University and also to Amritsar in Punjab.last_img read more

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Kiwis enter rugby quarterfinals

first_imgThree-time Commonwealth Games rugby champions New Zealand began their campaign on a confident note by breezing into the quarterfinals of the rugby sevens event at the University Stadium on Monday.The Kiwis, with four All Black players in their side, registered a 43-7 win over Canada, beat Guyana 52-0 and overpowered Scotland 46-0. New Zealand booked their berth in the quarterfinals along with Wales, South Africa, Scotland, Australia, England, Samoa and surprisingly, Kenya.The match against Canada was especially gripping, with the defending champions receiving two yellow cards. The Kiwis’ performance is even more commendable given the fact that in the second half, they were reduced to five men after Tomasi Cama and Liam Messam were sent off the field.However, they put in two more tries to seal the match. The hosts were never expected to match the speed and size of either South Africa or Wales. They lost to both convincingly.India went down to Wales 56-7 in their first game and were next hammered 59-0 by the South Africans. Against Tonga, whom India captain Nasser Hussain hoped to beat, the hosts were walloped 38-5 to register their third straight defeat.last_img read more

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Gold Coast Sevens – Fever Pitch

first_imgThe inaugural ‘Gold Coast Sevens – Fever Pitch’ tournament sees 16 teams from around the globe fight it out over two days to kick off the HSBC Sevens World Series 2011/12. The ‘Gold Coast Sevens – Fever Pitch’ tournament will be held on Saturday, 25 November and Sunday, 26 November 2011 at Skilled Park on the Gold Coast. Tickets start from $39, and you’ve got the opportunity to purchase your ticket the public sale begins. Get in quick to be there when Rugby meets party.A collaborative relationship between TFA and the Australian Rugby Union (ARU) has enabled the opportunity for TFA members to take advantage of an exclusive pre-sale opportunity. To take advantage of the pre-sale period, log on to www.ticketek.com.au between Monday, 10 October 9am and Tuesday, 11 October 5pm (AEST) and enter the password ‘GOLDIE’.  You can also call Ticketek on 132 849 or visit any Ticketek agency.last_img read more

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9 months agoBurnley fullback Taylor: Players are behind Hart

first_imgBurnley fullback Taylor: Players are behind Hartby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBurnley fullback Charlie Taylor says the players are behind Joe Hart.Hart, who had played in each of the first 19 league games this term, was dropped after the Everton match and Burnley have instead had Tom Heaton in goal for the last two league outings.Taylor said when asked about Hart: “Joe is a top professional and a top player.”We have a lot of top-class goalkeepers here and only one can play, so it’s a tough decision for the manager, and he made the call of putting Tom back in.”I think everyone would say Joe has played really well this season and is unlucky to lose his place, but that’s football, and Tom has come in and results have happened.”It’s unlucky on Joe, but he’s not changed anything around the place – he’s still a top pro, a top player and is brilliant to have in the dressing room.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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MOCA Toronto names director of programs

center_img With the naming today of November Paynter as the director of programs for Toronto’s Museum of Contemporary Art, the unpredictable evolution of the museum’s leadership took another turn. Paynter’s appointment comes seven months after Chantal Pontbriand left MOCA as its first-ever chief executive officer. Pontbriand’s surprising departure had occurred less than eight months after she assumed the newly created position.Paynter joins MOCA from SALT, a Turkish not-for-profit institution based in Istanbul and Ankara. British-born and educated at the Royal College of Art in London, Paynter was the founding associate director of research and programs at SALT from 2011 to 2016.She arrives at her new post in Toronto with the museum in the midst of significant transition. The opening of MOCA’s new home (in rented quarters at Tower Automotive Building, a century-old former factory in the city’s west end) has been delayed from the spring of this year to the fall. Advertisement Login/Register With:last_img read more

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