Brand leadership award for South Africa

first_imgTravellers arriving at Zurich airportduring the World Economic Forum earlierin 2010 were greeted by stunning SouthAfrican vistas.(Image: IMC) MEDIA CONTACTS • Chantal WellingtonIMC digital content manager+27 11 483 0122MediaClubSouthAfrica.com reporterAnitha Soni, chairperson of the board of trustees of the International Marketing Council of South Africa (IMC), will receive the Brand Leadership Award at the 19th World Brand Congress in Mumbai, India, later in November.Described as the most prestigious award an individual can receive at the congress, the award is one of several accolades to be given. Others include CEO of the Year, Media Professional of the Year, and Brand Builder of the Year.The World Brand Congress represents 60 countries. Some 600 branding and marketing specialists are expected to participate in the 2010 event.Soni, a tourism specialist and award-winning businesswoman, will be honoured for her “professional efforts” in overseeing the activities of the IMC, as it delivers on its mandate to manage the country’s reputation, and position South Africa as an investment destination of choice.Under her guidance, the IMC is delivering on this mandate, both domestically and internationally. The most recent and highest-profile example is the 2010 Fifa World Cup – here the IMC’s mobilisation initiatives engendered strong social cohesion among South Africans, fulfilling the country’s 2010 brand promise to “celebrate Africa’s humanity”.She was also instrumental in the council’s drive to position South Africa’s business and economic competitiveness at the 2010 meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, which saw a powerful delegation of political and business leaders departing for Switzerland to promote the country’s agenda.While at the congress Soni will deliver a speech titled “The impact of international events on a nation’s pride and therefore its brand – sharing South Africa’s 2010 World Cup experience”.Passionate about South AfricaSoni believes the award does not belong to her alone, but to all the role players in government and the private sector that participate in building the country’s brand.“The IMC is the custodian of Brand South Africa, but the brand belongs to all South Africans,” she said. “The World Cup has shown that when South Africans act with unity of purpose, everyone contributes to growing our reputation on the international stage.“The primary role players responsible for enhancing the nation brand are dedicated, skilled and passionate about our country. This past year they have worked with great diligence to foster relationships, engage with international stakeholders and promote South Africa.”Soni added that the award belongs to everyone who contributed to South Africa’s enhanced global reputation, and that she would think of all South Africa’s brand builders when the award was placed in her hands.last_img read more

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Gujarat: The incumbency factor

first_imgWhy doesn’t the anti-incumbency factor work against Narendra Modi? He has been in power for nine years. Crises that would have singed other chief ministers leave him unscathed. The answer lies in his innovative and inclusive day-to-day governance programmes which have created a public image of an administrator who cares,Why doesn’t the anti-incumbency factor work against Narendra Modi? He has been in power for nine years. Crises that would have singed other chief ministers leave him unscathed. The answer lies in his innovative and inclusive day-to-day governance programmes which have created a public image of an administrator who cares about popular grievances.Modi’s ability to create a public perception that his government cares for sections like women, children and the poor has helped build his image.As a leading social worker who is not a great admirer of Modi says, “His success stems from a combination of a few populist and many visionary non-populist public welfare programmes which he implements with equal vigour even when they don’t hold any immediate political benefit for him. This is something new that people are seeing. Modi’s ability to create a public perception that his Government cares for sections like women, children and the poor has helped further.”Feroze Shaikh, a daily wage labourer in Dhoraji in Saurashtra, will vouch for this. His four-year-old son needed immediate cardiac surgery, but Shaikh had no money to pay for it. The government stepped in and the boy was operated upon free of cost at the U.N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology in Ahmedabad like 2,000 other poor cardiac patients. A grateful Shaikh says, “There’s no denying that Modi’s government cares for the poor like no one else does.” Says the institute’s director Dr. R.K. Patel, “The scheme bears the cost of any surgery for poor patients and is unparalleled in the country and has struck a chord with the poor.” Perhaps this is the key to the BJP’s recent landslide victory in the state civic polls.advertisementOne of his oldest schemes is Swagat, which has won many international awards. Once a month the chief minister connects complainants, officers concerned and district collectors via video conferencing. The scheme has a very high success rate and keeps the bureaucracy on tenterhooks. One-Day Governance, a scheme under which 250 centres carry out 70 services – including issuing various certificates and licenses in a fixed time – are also monitored online.Modi is the author of the Kanya Kelavni (girl child education) scheme, travelling to rural Gujarat once a year with his IAS officers to persuade villagers to send their girl children to school instead of just doing daily household chores. The eight-year-old Betri Bachao Andolan (Save the Girl Child Mission) scheme under the State’s Women and Child Welfare Department has been spreading public awareness against sex determination tests and female infanticide. Gunotsav was an unprecedented self-appraisal drive for mapping the precise academic strength of students in the state’s government schools.Modi visited schools in Gujarat’s remotest corners with his team of IAS officers to assess students and their progress with the help of a pre-set questionnaire for each standard. The exercise showed that the government school students were lagging behind their urban counterparts and helped the administration chart out a set of corrective measures.To inculcate reading habits in students instead of letting them watch TV, last week more than 70 lakh students led by Modi simultaneously read books across the state under the Vanche Gujarat (Read Gujarat) campaign. The state government has also chalked out a programme under which scooter-borne librarians will go to villages with books and ask school students to read them under the watchful eyes of local teachers.Later this month the chief minister is organising Gujarat Khel Mahakumbh in Gandhinagar in which 7.50 lakh students have registered for athletics and western and Indian sports disciplines; the annual state winter games have only 30,000 students participating. Ahmedabad District Collector Harit Shukla aptly puts it, “People have seen only votecatching measures like getting free colour television sets on the eve of elections. But Modi has built a brand that goes beyond votes and touches people’s hearts through his peopleoriented measures at the grassroot level and his communication skills.”For Gujarat, Brand Modi seems to be worth another Assembly election.last_img read more

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IPL 2011: Governing council meet on ‘podium-linked’ fee issue

first_imgThe governing council of the Indian Premier League met in Mumbai on Friday to discuss the ‘podium-linked fee’ structure that the capped Indian players had protested against on Tuesday.Gautam Gambhir was bought by Kolkata IPL team for Rs 11.04 cr. APThe cricketers had objected to a clause in their contract with the respective franchises that denies them 20 per cent of their fees in case their team fails to finish among the top three.The clause has been introduced for season IV. As per the rule, if the teams fail to qualify for the Champions League (top three IPL teams make it to the international league), the players would get only 80 per cent of their fees.The players had termed the clause “unfair” and had approached Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) president Shashank Manohar for their redressal.However, the team owners insisted there was nothing unfair in the clause as the players’ payment was meant to be for both the IPL and the Champions League.The clause was part of the contract of only those players whose names figured during the IPL auction in Bangalore.last_img read more

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