Aspects of Scotia Sea zooplankton

first_imgInformation on small scale distributions of three species of Antarctic zooplankton is reviewed. Aggregations of the euphausiid Euphausia superba, the tunicate Salpa thompsoni, and the amphipod Parathemisto gaudichaudii are compared, and the manner in which such aggregations mav arise is discussed. A possible relationship between swarming and feeding activity in E. superba is suggested in which krill are thought to be dispersed whilst feeding but that on repletion they swarm. It is thought that this may account for this species’ irregular spatial distribution as recorded bv previous expeditions. A further consequence of this theory is that during the Winter swarming will be minimal.last_img

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News story: David Mundell helps launch Lockerbie memorial cycle

first_imgTo mark the 30th anniversary of the bombing of PanAm 103 over Lockerbie in December 1988, a group of local cyclists will ride this October from Lockerbie to Syracuse University in in upstate New York.Scottish Secretary David Mundell joined team leader Colin Dorrance and the rest of the cyclists at Lockerbie Academy to launch the project. The Secretary of State was the first signatory in a commemorative book which will accompany the team on the journey to Syracuse University.Mr Mundell said: I was really pleased to be part of the launch of ‘Cycle to Syracuse’. Five local men are going to cycle from Lockerbie Academy to Syracuse University to commemorate the thirtieth anniversary of the bombing of PanAm Flight 103 over Lockerbie. Since then, hugely important links have been forged between Lockerbie – particularly between Lockerbie Academy – and Syracuse University. It is right that we mark this significant anniversary by showing how important the link between Lockerbie and Syracuse is. On 21 December 1988, 259 people boarded PanAm Flight 103 at London Heathrow and did not make it home. They were killed by a terrorist bomb aboard the aircraft, which detonated in the skies above Lockerbie. The resulting collision of the aircraft wreckage in the town killed 11 residents on the ground and traumatised hundreds more. Thirty years on, ‘Cycle to Syracuse’ aims to complete the journey on behalf of those who could not. It will remember those lost in the air and on the ground, the work of the emergency services and the response of the townspeople in the aftermath.A group of five local men will form the core of the team, representing Lockerbie Academy, Police Scotland, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, Scottish Ambulance Service and RAF Mountain Rescue Service.They will also raise money for local youth mental health charity Soul Soup. People can donate online and also find further information on the cycle.last_img read more

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Coronavirus spreading now in Korea has its origin in Europe, US

first_imgThe novel coronavirus spreading in South Korea now has its origin in Europe and the US, health authorities said Monday. The variant belongs to the GH clade, which is usually found in Europe and the US, according to an analysis on genome samples. This implies the virus could have been imported into Korea by those who entered Korea from those regions in March and April. “As we interpret it, the virus belonging to the GH clade is circulating recently because we had many arrivals from Europe and the US in March and April, and the virus imported then is now driving community transmissions,” said Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Jeong Eun-kyung, at a briefing. The variants found in the genome samples in February and March, when the country saw hundreds of cases linked to a church in Daegu and hospital in North Gyeongsang Province at the peak of the COVID-19 outbreak here, belonged to the S clade and V clade. The virus in the S and V clades were circulated largely in China, where the coronavirus is believed to have originated from, and other parts of Asia. Touching on recent study results on the possibility of airborne spread of the COVID-19, Jeong said that the measures to prevent the spread of the virus stays the same, calling on the public to stick to the basic rules such as avoiding enclosed, populated environments, wearing masks and washing hands. This came after 239 scientists from 32 countries called on governments to acknowledge the aerosol transmission of the COVID-19 and take control measures in an open letter to be published this week. On Monday, Korea reported 48 more COVID-19 cases as the country continues to see small-scale outbreaks, infections coming from overseas as well as an increasing number of cases with unidentified routes of transmission.Half of the new cases, 24, were locally transmitted and the other half were imported. Of the locally transmitted cases, seven were registered in Gwangju in connection with a previously identified Buddhist temple cluster. Five cases were reported in Gyeonggi Province, five in Incheon, two each in South Jeolla Province, Daejeon and Seoul, according to the KCDC. Seven more people tested positive for the coronavirus in connection with the temple in Gwangju, bringing the number of related total infections to 87, according to the KCDC. A surge in cases in South Jeolla Province, which surrounds Gwangju, led the provincial government to tighten social distancing measures. Under the “social distancing level 2,” gatherings of 50 or more people indoors or 100 or more people outdoors are banned, and wearing masks is mandatory when using public transportation. Of the total cases reported in the past week, infection routes for 10.7 percent of the cases remain unidentified, Jeong said, adding “quiet transmission” among those in their 50s or over is taking place in the community. Korea reported 24 additional imported cases, 21 of them were from Asia and three from the Americas. Some 15 people detected at the airport quarantine screening and the rest while under quarantine after they entered the country from abroad.Out of the country’s total 13,137 cases, 11,848 people, or about 90.2 percent, were released from quarantine after making full recoveries. Some 1,005 people are under quarantine. One more patient died, bringing the death toll to 284. The overall fatality rate stands at 2.16 percent. The country has carried out 1,297,367 tests since Jan. 3, with 21,292 people being tested as of Monday.  Topics :last_img read more

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