Striking changes

first_imgThe state is set for another supermarket strike in the Los Angeles area – and that would be an even more serious mistake for the industry and its workers than the last one. The times are changing for a lot of industries and their work forces these days, and the 139-day grocery strike that ended in February 2004 was a dramatic example of that trend. During the long months of the strike, Southern Californians changed their grocery-shopping habits and turned to the alternatives – Trader Joe’s, Gelson’s, Whole Foods, Vallarta markets, the ethnic makers in every corner of the city and the bulk food stores, like Costco. The grocery chains lost an estimated $2 billion, and workers lost months of wages. They really don’t want to drive shoppers to the alternatives and hurt themselves even more in the future. And in the end, the shoppers won’t notice much of a difference. They’ll be too busy checking out the fresh, organic produce at the farmers market or the deals at Trader Joe’s.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! And if the current impasse forces another strike, it would surely be another blow to the grocers and their workers. The grocery workers union, the United Food and Commercial Workers, has a responsibility to negotiate the best deal possible for its workers. And Ralphs, Vons and Albertsons must fight for what they can afford to pay with already thin margins. But it’s a drama that ought to be tempered by the knowledge that nobody really wins in a strike and by economic realities of a changing industry. Workers and the grocery chains are each struggling for economic survival. In this fight, however, sanity must prevail or both sides will suffer gravely. last_img read more

Read More »

Cypress: Semper NOR Flash meets automotive ISO 26262 functional safety

first_imgCypress Semiconductor announced its Semper NOR Flash memory family that delivers the industry’s best combination of safety and reliability for automotive and industrial applications. The Semper Flash family is the first memory that is architected and designed to meet the automotive industry’s ISO 26262 functional safety standard for building fail-safe embedded automotive systems. The family is automotive-qualified, ASIL-B functional safety compliant, and provides superior endurance and data retention at the extreme temperatures common in automotive and industrial applications.Cypress’ EnduraFlex architecture simplifies system design by enabling a Semper Flash device to be divided into multiple partitions, independently optimized for high endurance or long retention. For frequent data writes, a partition can be configured to deliver up to 1.28 million program-erase cycles for 512Mb density parts and 2.56 million cycles for 1Gb parts. For code and configuration storage, a partition can be configured to retain data for 25 years.The Semper Flash family includes AEC-Q100 automotive-qualified devices with an extended temperature range of -40 to +125°C, supports 1.8-V and 3.0-V operating ranges, and is available in densities of 512Mb through 4Gb. The devices are offered with Quad Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI), Octal SPI and HyperBus interfaces. The Octal and HyperBus interface devices are compliant with the JEDEC eXpanded SPI (xSPI) standard for high-speed x8 serial NOR Flash and offer read bandwidth of 400 MBps.Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Chips & Components Continue Reading Previous IAR: Visual State Version 9.1 with updated design and code generation toolNext VadaTech: NVMe HBA AMC modules with dual/quad M.2 SSD’slast_img read more

Read More »