Football JT Barretts path to the biggest win in his career

Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) signals a first down in the fourth quarter of the B1G Championship game against Wisconsin on Dec. 2 in Lucas Oil Stadium. Ohio State won 27-21. Credit: James King II | Sports DirectorINDIANAPOLIS — Staring at a packed defensive line and an empty backfield, Ohio State’s drive hinged on J.T. Barrett. The situation: fourth-and-1 with seven minutes left on Wisconsin’s 13-yard line with Ohio State clinging to a narrow 24-21 lead.Barrett took the snap and rushed right into a defender behind the line of scrimmage. Wisconsin fans in the stands and players began to celebrate, but the play was not over. Barrett pushed on. Leaning on a knee that had surgery just six days ago, he spun free of the defender, bounced to the outside and willed himself to the first-down marker. “That was a very tough call. Offensive line wanted to go for it,” head coach Urban Meyer said. “But we’re up by three. If we do not, that gives them life. I’ve just been on the other side of that ball, all you need is a field goal to tie the game as opposed to you need a touchdown.”Barrett was not fully healthy. The knee that helped him spin out of the defender’s grasp had forced him to leave the team’s last game against Michigan with a knee injury and required surgery the following day. Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) crashes in a touchdown in the second quarter of the B1G Championship game against Wisconsin on Dec. 2 in Lucas Oil Stadium. Ohio State won 27-21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorSix days later, Barrett proved one healthy leg was all he needed to propel the No. 8 Buckeyes to the 27-21 victory in the Big Ten championship game against No. 4 Wisconsin. He finished 12-for-26 for 211 passing yards, two touchdowns and two interceptions, while rushing 19 times for 60 yards for one touchdown.After the team’s win against Michigan last week, Barrett said he would be ready to start despite uncertainty expressed by Meyer. He made sure he stayed true to that statement.“I said I was going to play next week,” Barrett said Saturday. “So if I didn’t, I was kind of going to be a liar. And I wouldn’t lie.”Having the arthroscopic surgery the following day was not an option, the quarterback said. It was a requirement.“I really couldn’t straighten my leg out being my meniscus popped out,” Barrett said. “But I mean, it was just a small procedure, really. And then just a lot of treatment. A lot of time in the training room. Tried to do my best to get my mental reps through film and then out there on the field as well so I’d be able to play today.”Barrett spent a minimum of 15 hours with the training staff, Meyer estimated. Meyer said after the surgery, his return was a step-by-step process and that by Thursday, the team knew he would be ready to go. That itself was remarkable considering all he had been through. Meyer said only one other player had come back within a week from that similar surgery and played.But he said there was never any doubt in his mind Barrett would start.“How you keep him out of a game, I just don’t know how it happens,” Meyer said. Redshirt senior center Billy Price said during the week in an effort to alleviate some of the potential pressures put on Barrett’s injury, Barrett spent time watching tape rather than fully participating in the physical warmups of practice. Barrett added that it wasn’t until Friday, the morning the team left for Indianapolis, that he even had any practice running.Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) dives for a first down in the fourth quarter of the B1G Championship game against Wisconsin on Dec. 2 in Lucas Oil Stadium. Ohio State won 27-21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo Editor“I took about half the Thursday reps in practice. And I was mainly throwing the football. Didn’t run at all,” Barrett said. “And then yesterday before we took the bus ride here, I did a whole bunch of cutting and planting on my knee. And I had confidence in my ability to go out there. So it wasn’t like I was second-guessing at all.”When game time rolled around, the uncertainty over Barrett’s ability to start was not in question. But the players and coaches collectively held their breath whenever he would take a big hit.“Whenever he hits the ground, I want to be the first one over there to be, ‘Hey, are you OK? Everything good? Let’s get to the next play,’” Price said. “And I don’t like people hitting him anyway, so it’s an aspect of checking on your man. I mean that’s my dude.”Meyer knew he had backup quarterback Dwayne Haskins, who filled in admirably for Barrett last week against Michigan, at the ready should the need arise.It did not. Though Haskins was seen frequently warming up on the sideline, Barrett maintained his grip on the starting role from the opening snap until when he planted that injured knee on the ground in the victory formation in the game’s final seconds. It appeared early on that his injury was hampering his performance. The dual-threat quarterback appeared to wait in the pocket for receivers to be open down field far more often than normal and his speed appeared just a notch below normal.On his team’s first drive of the game, he escaped the pocket to the left for two yards before being tackled. However, there was plenty of open space and a healthy Barrett likely would have made it closer to, if not all the way, to the first-down marker.But he seemed to turn all questions around fast. In the quest for his first-ever Big Ten title at the helm, Barrett turned things around on his next drive. Junior wide receiver Terry McLaurin caught an 84-yard touchdown pass deep down the field and outran defenders for a touchdown. The next drive, Barrett found H-back Parris Campbell, who hauled in a short pass and took it to the house for the 57-yard score.Ohio State junior wide receiver Terry McLaurin (83) runs the ball in for a touchdown in the first quarter of the B1G Championship game against Wisconsin on Dec. 2 in Lucas Oil Stadium. Ohio State won 27-21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo Editor“The open pass to start the game to Terry McLaurin was a great pass,” Meyer said. “We caught them in zero hold coverage and it was a big hit. And Parris came out the end of the other bubble. Whenever you play zero hold coverage, if you break your tackle you come out the other end.”Barrett had two other chances to hit wide-open receivers for additional scores in the second quarter when H-back K.J. Hill and wide receiver Johnnie Dixon both found themselves with space behind the Badgers’ defense. Twice, Barrett overshot his intended targets.“We left a lot of yardage on the field,” Meyer said. “We had some misfires in the throw game that were — guys were wide open. But I thought we adjusted fairly good against one of the top defenses in the country. Still had 450 yards of offense, but there was a lot of offense on the field.”Despite the mistakes Barrett made Saturday, he did enough for Ohio State to win the game. He was not the MVP of the game. But Ohio State had several moments when its offensive leader did exactly what was needed.Barrett wanted to start Saturday, but was dealing with an injury. So he willed himself to start. Barrett wanted the first down on that crucial play in the fourth quarter. So he willed himself to the first-down. Barrett wanted the Big Ten championship game. So he willed himself to win. read more

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In This Issue… Commodity Currencies rally… G

first_imgIn This Issue… * Commodity Currencies rally… * Gold up $20, Oil trades to $103… * Russia & Iran remove dollars… * Hildegard resigns… And, Now, Today’s Pfennig For Your Thoughts! Consumer Credit Explodes! Good day… And a Tom Terrific Tuesday to you! Winter is supposed to return to us this week, hopefully after I’ve left for warmer weather! But, even an old curmudgeon like me that likes to complain about cold weather, Can’t complain about what we’ve had this past week… I’ll tell you something else I can’t complain about… And that is all the wonderful, dear readers I have! Long time readers have been through a lot with me over the years, and even if you’re not a long time reader, you get caught up pretty quickly, given my propensity to talk about personal stuff… So… we all have that going for us, eh? HA! The currencies are seeing some wind gather in their collective sails this morning, led by the euro, which at this point in the morning is back to 1.28. Gold is up $16, this morning, and for the first time since the first trading day of 2012, to me, things look right… But I know how any risk asset rally is like walking on egg shells, so I’ll temper my enthusiasm this morning, which, I might add, isn’t difficult to do, given how early I do this! What About Me? Have you ever heard that song by Quicksilver Messenger Service? This song was written about 40+ years ago, and it’s almost as if it could have been written today… If you don’t know the song, you should download it from ITunes or whatever service you use… And listen to the words… This song has been a staple for me all these years, and goes to show you that history repeats… Why do I bring this up today? Well… yesterday, I saw something flash across the screen and suddenly, I was taken back in time. To a time when consumers ruled the roost, and were the main driver of the U.S. economy… It’s was all seashells and balloons back then, but then someone realized that the consumers were building debt that was most likely not going to be repaid, and it all came crashing down around us… Do we ever learn anything? Yesterday, it was reported by the Fed that there was a massive increase in U.S. Consumer credit in November. Consumer Credit rose by $20.4 Billion (Biggest gain since Nov. 2001!) VS the forecast of a $7 Billion increase… Credit card, revolving debt rose $5.6 Billion, and non-revolving credit increased $14.8 Billion… If you put the S&P 500 Index on a price graph, and then laid the Consumer Credit price graph on top of the S&P, you would see a correlation between these two like no other correlation. So, it will be interesting to see if this correlation continues to track step by step, for if it does, that’s a good sign for risk assets… But the more important thing I want to point out, is the Consumer Credit Increase, and the borrowing habits, that are being revisited… Do we ever learn anything? I don’t think so… I think the Commodity Currencies of: Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, Norway, Brazil and others are already receiving some of the benefits associated with a risk asset rally, and in fact, the Commodity Currencies are outperforming the euro this morning, which leads me to believe that they are dragging the euro to higher ground… We’ve seen this happen a few times in the past couple of years. Speaking of the euro… and vis-à-vis the Eurozone… Germany’s Merkel, and France’s Sarkozy met yesterday to discuss the defense of the euro… They didn’t invent a hoola-hoop, and in fact stated nothing more than the obvious… That boosting economic growth in the Eurozone is a priority… Hmmm… now, if I were in the room when they made this statement, I would have asked them… “But how can you stimulate growth, when Germany has led the charge to accept austerity measures, to reduce budget deficits.”? They would have probably answered me the same way my Econ professor did many years ago…. “Volume”… HA! The Eurozone leaders are between a rock and… well, another rock! And they are standing in a muddy quagmire of debt… Merkel and Sarkozy will meet with the IMF’s Lagarde tonight (for them)… should be an interesting dinner conversation! Speaking of muddy quagmires of debt… The U.S. passed the 100% of GDP, line of demarcation, in debt late in 2011 … Hey Greece! Move over and make room for us! Because here we come, with both feet leading the way! I guess we’ll find out which program or method of dealing with debt works the best, eh? We have the Europeans going for austerity measures to cut debt, while hanging their economies out on a wire in red corner… and in the blue corner we have the all-time champ of the world, the U.S. who is going for printing money, and Government spending programs, which keeps their economy afloat… Slow, but afloat… Which one will come crashing down like a house of cards? I think you know what my answer would be! But that won’t stop the markets from being confused about all this, and reward the dollar… In the short-run, that is… Until they won’t reward the dollar any longer, because things never got any better, and the U.S. debt continued to grow, and grow… When will that come? No one can tell you the timing of these things, folks… But as I’ve already told you, if my thoughts are correct, by summer when things begin to heat up with the elections, and the focus shifts back to the U.S. debt problems, that will be the time… But, that’s just my opinion, folks… I could very well be wrong… Remember last year, when I said we would have QE3 by the time the cold north winds began to call the leaves home? Well, technically, the Fed is still doing QE, they just didn’t come out and name it as such… So, you see, I could very well be wrong on this… we’ll have to wait-n-see, eh? Did you see where Russia and Iran have decided to do a Chinese-like currency swap? Iran and Russia will exchange their own currencies in terms of trade, and remove U.S. dollars from the terms of trade… Uh-oh… now it’s not just China that’s taking the dollar out of the middle of their trade flows… Pretty soon, having the reserve currency of the world isn’t going to be such a big thing, if all the commodity trade isn’t settled in dollars! Can you blame any country, that wants to remove dollars from their reserves? The dollars that have lost so much value over the years! And it’s not like they want to sterilize the dollars by putting them back into U.S. Treasuries yielding less than 2%, and with no place for yields to go but up, which would create even more losses for the holders… Which is why I still question this “safe haven currency” title the dollar holds… yes, it’s the most liquid currency in the world, but if countries keep taking dollars out of the terms of their trade, how much longer can it remain the most liquid currency? Yes… these things are clear to me, but that doesn’t mean they’ll happen today, tomorrow, or next year… But why wait to protect your investments from all this? OK, I’ll get off my soapbox now, and come back to what’s going on in the currencies and metals… Recall last week when I told you that the Swiss National Bank President, Hildegard, was going to fess up about his wife’s currency trades ahead of the fixing of the franc to the euro last fall, and would probably resign, which could lead to a pop in the Swiss franc, with the markets taking the stance that with Hildegard gone, the SNB would be less interested in defending the floor that was put in on the franc/euro cross… Well, then Hildegard didn’t fess up to anything, and didn’t resign… But yesterday, under pressure by the SNB, Hildegard did indeed resign, and now I’m waiting for the “pop”! I guess the euro couldn’t stand prosperity… earlier in the letter I told you that the euro had rallied to 1.28 this morning… Well, it has slipped back below 1.28… not by much, but still not moving higher as it once was this morning. France received some comforting news this morning from the ratings agency, Fitch, who said they didn’t expect to downgrade France in 2012… Of course that does little to remove the Sword of Damocles that has hung over France, and placed there by S&P, who put France on negative watch last month. The price of Oil has reached $103 this morning… So, commodities of all kinds are back on the rally tracks this morning. The stronger than expected jobs number last week in the U.S. and the falling interest rates in China, that we’ve talked about, are fueling this Commodity rally… One of our metals traders, Tim Smith, shouted over to me last week, some info on Silver Eagles, which at the time I was busy and didn’t stop to really listen (Ok there I said it, sorry Tim!) , but now seeing what he said in writing, is quite interesting! I talk all the time about how the demand for Silver (& Gold) continues to be quite strong… Well, Silver guru, Ted Butler, tells us that sales of Silver Eagles for 2011 accounted for the entire U.S. mine production for the year. And that the entire Silver mine production of Canada was consumed by the sale of Silver Maple Leafs last year! I have to admit that seeing that kind of demand is even greater than I thought! You know, there are industrial uses of Silver that are quite demanding… And if the entire mine production went toward Silver Eagle coins last year, the Silver needed for industrial use, had to be imported… Again, something that should have pushed the price of Silver toward the moon! But NOOOOOOOO! We had our friends (NOT!) the price manipulators to deal with! Well, it’s time for all that stuff to stop! Stop, I say! And finally… I see where the U.S. Budget Director is going to become the new chief of staff at the White House… I guess he was doing such a bang-up job with the Budget, that he got a promotion! I’m shaking my head in disgust here folks, not at the person, but the process… Then there was this… Gold experts in the Netherlands advised the federal government it should start facilitating the repatriation of its gold reserves from the U.S. , as well as from Great Britain and Canada, after the Dutch central bank (DNB) confirmed a Dutch newspaper report by the de Volkskrant that revealed much of the country’s reserves of the yellow metal are not within the country. Dutch gold experts all the more got restless when American commentator Jim Richards, according to the Radio Netherlands Worldwide, said the US government has the power to confiscate whatever foreign gold reserves it holds in the event global interest on the dollar decelerated, still owing to the global fiscal crisis that had shaken the fiscal stability of the much developed economies. Chuck again… Yes… that’s the last place I would hold Gold… at the New York Fed! Especially knowing that it could be confiscated by the U.S. Gov’t! To recap… Commodity Currencies are rallying this morning, dragging the euro along for the ride. The stronger than expected jobs number in the U.S. last week, and the lowering of reserve ratios, which is the same as a rate cut in China are improving the prospects for Commodities, which are also rallying this morning with Gold up $18 and Oil at $103. Merkel & Sarkozy didn’t invent a hoola-hoop for the Eurozone economy, but who thought they would? And U.S. Consumer Credit explodes higher in November… do we ever learn anything? Currencies today 1/10/12… American Style: A$ $1.0320, kiwi .7945, C$ .9820, euro 1.2775, sterling 1.5465, Swiss $1.0535, … European Style: rand 8.0840, krone 5.9950, SEK 6.9030, forint 245, zloty 3.4980, koruna 20.1980, RUB 31.65, yen 76.85, sing 1.2905, HKD 7.7670, INR 51.70, China 6.3145, pesos 13.60, BRL 1.8110, Dollar Index 80.91, Oil $103, 10-year 1.97%, Silver $29.66, and Gold… $1,630.80 That’s it for today… Congrats to Alabama for their big win in the National Championship last night… But now, in 2 games this year, the teams split, so how can Alabama be named the National Champion? They have one loss, so does LSU, and they are against each other… I don’t have a dog in this hunt, but if I were from LSU, I would be going crazy right now… Little Everett was over last night. He fell and had 4 stitches in his forehead last week. We played Where’s Everett most of the time he was there. He’s still a happy little guy, that is as long as you don’t tell him “no”… of which I have no problem with! Ok… time to get this out the door… I hope you have a Tom Terrific Tuesday! Chuck Butler President EverBank World Markets 1-800-926-4922 1-314-647-3837 www.everbank.comlast_img read more

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first_img— Recommended Link Great article about the climate change hoax. Al Gore had it all wrong. He reversed the cause and effect. Higher temperatures cause the CO2 to come out of the water and CO2 does not cause the temperature to rise.– David BenefitsNot being part of a nation state ameliorates a lot of problems for a person, but it’s not a total solution. What The Diamond Age posits, and I think is going to happen, is that people will form phyles, joining in an alliance according to what’s most important to them. Or the way they “self-identify,” to use a currently fashionable term. Jews famously stick together relative to the goyim. That’s one reason at least part of Israel (likely excluding the Hasidim and Palestinians) will survive as a nation. One reason Mormons are so successful is that they favor each other, like the Jews. Muslims (although rarely economically successful, for other cultural reasons) definitely do the same. Birds of a feather (all the outraged hysteria about racism notwithstanding) do, in fact, tend to flock together.So here’s my prediction of what’s going to happen over the next couple of generations. Many nation states will simply collapse or disappear. Incidentally, I don’t think the U.S. will be a survivor. The country used to share a common culture, albeit with quaint regional variations. That’s no longer the case. The election of Trump has crystalized long-simmering, and growing antagonisms. It’s not that Americans just have a political difference of opinion. It now boils down to mutual cultural hatred, and on a visceral level. It’s only been exacerbated by the push for “multiculturalism,” always a stupid and destructive concept, from the usual suspects.Take California, the Left Coast, for instance. Even now some of them are talking about divorcing themselves from hated Flyover Country. But even California makes no sense as a political entity. What does the Mexican population have in common with Silicon Valley? Nothing. What do the hippies in Humboldt County have in common with the Los Angelenos? Nothing. What do farmers in the Central Valley have in common with anybody else in the state? Nothing.Incidentally, we can break down Canada and Mexico the same way. Much smaller entities within these (and all other) countries would be much more viable. But still anachronistic. And suboptimal.So what will happen? Everywhere people will reorganize for mutual support, defense, insurance, companionship, and everything else. But it won’t have much to do with politics as we now know it. They’ll form phyles.An outrageous concept, I know. Now you see why radical ideas are best presented in the form of novels.Regards,Doug Casey Founder, Casey ResearchReader MailbagOur inbox is still overflowing from the controversial nature of last week’s two-part interview, “Doug Casey and E.B. Tucker on the Climate Change Hoax.” (Check out part one and part two to get in on the debate)…Climate change is not a matter of “opinion.” Polar ice caps are melting; we have pictures! Temperatures and oceans are rising, we have the numbers for you to look at! More to the point: if I can’t count on you morons to pay attention to simple pictures and numbers, why in God’s name would I trust you with my retirement funds? Don’t worry about me, though; there are plenty of rubes out there just begging to be fleeced!– Brett Justin’s note: Longtime readers know what Doug Casey thinks of nation states. He says they’ve mostly been an “inefficient, counterproductive, and expensive nuisance” and a “testimony to how thoughtless the average person is.” If you haven’t yet, make sure to check out our interview on this subject (see here and here).In today’s essay, Doug predicts what will happen to nation states over the next couple of generations… and what could ultimately replace them…By Doug Casey, founder, Casey ResearchScience fiction has always offered both a more accurate and more timely look at the future than any think tank. For one thing, a good book is the product of a genius, not a committee of suits trying to reach a consensus. And a format of fiction allows one to speculate in ways that a “serious person” can’t do in nonfiction.Every educated person should have read the classics by Jules Verne, Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, and Arthur C. Clarke, among others. Add Neal Stephenson to that list. I’ve been a fan of Stephenson’s novel The Diamond Age since it was published in 1995. I strongly recommend you read the book.There are many themes in The Diamond Age, which refers to a near-term future (I’ll guess around 2050) when nanotechnology has transformed much of life. Although not nearly as radically as I believe will actually be the case. (See my essays on the future here and here.)But one theme in the book is quite a breakthrough, and spot-on. It posits the creation of “phyles” as the major form of social and political organization. The word comes from the same root as phylum, from the Greek, meaning “tribe” or “clan.” But I think it’s also a pun on the word “filial,” with its connotations of family. The book posits, I believe correctly, that in the near future most nation states will have broken down. Many will have ceased to exist. It’s quite logical, because they’re a dysfunctional way for people to organize. And it’s happening right before our eyes. None of the countries in the Middle East, Africa, or Central Asia have any coherence. They’re just the result of some ruler’s military prowess, or some politicians drawing lines on a distant map. Nation states themselves have really only been around since the 17th century. Before that, people weren’t loyal to a country; they were loyal to a chief, a king, or an emperor.Loyalty to a country can make some sense, on at least a primitive atavistic level, as long as the inhabitants of the “country” share a common language, religion, ethnicity, and customs. But it makes no sense when they have little in common. So it’s natural, and salubrious, for the various religious, ethnic, racial, cultural, or economic groups within a country that’s become too big, too “diverse,” and too “inclusive,” to want to get out. Everyone recognizes – even if they don’t say it – that a national government is just a vehicle for theft, benefiting the group that controls it.As the world becomes more educated, the average man becomes more acutely aware of that fact. And as jet travel and the internet become universal, people start to realize they might have almost nothing in common with their so-called “countrymen.” And a lot more in common with people who may be on the other side of the globe, many of whom will feel the same way about their own countrymen.I can tell you that I have much more in common with friends in the Congo or China than I do with my fellow Americans living down the road from me in a trailer park. I have nothing in common with them. These people not only aren’t my friends, they’re liabilities. And may turn into active enemies under the right circumstances. I’d rather associate with people with whom I share common values and interests, not just the same government ID.In any event, almost all the world’s nation states are terminally burdened with debt, taxes, regulations and increasingly, strife between groups fighting for either a teat on the milk cow or political power. The nation state is a dinosaur; it no longer makes sense in a world with today’s technology and demographics.This explains what we’ve seen in the last generation: the breakup of states. The USSR into 15 components. Yugoslavia into six. Czechoslovakia into two. Sudan into two. This is just the opening round. Most European countries have secessionist movements. Russia should eventually break up into a dozen new states. China into at least a half-dozen. Brazil into at least two. Bolivia into at least two, etc., etc.Military Violence and TerrorIn fact, the primary reason that’s given for the very existence of the nation state is to defend its inhabitants. But, with the changing nature of warfare, that’s one of the things it’s least able to do. Can it defend against a nuclear attack? No. At best it can just threaten to counterattack.In fact, a country with a big military stationed all over the world, not only can’t defend its citizens, but actually draws in attacks by making enemies among the natives in far off places. In the past, it didn’t matter – the natives were immobile and powerless. Today they can go anywhere and access a wide variety of weapons.In fact, governments are so united against “terrorism” because it’s not just a very effective tactic against the nation state – it really can only be used against the nation state. Governments couldn’t care less about the few hundreds of people that might be killed in a terror attack. They care because it threatens their existence.In today’s world, nation states are no longer the big risk to other nation states. Rather, it’s groups like ISIS and al Qaeda that are a much bigger threat. They can’t be destroyed by dropping a nuke on their cities; they don’t have cities. They can be everywhere and anywhere. But they can easily attack the cities of their enemy. And those are just well-known Islamic threats. There will likely be many others of many varieties, on templates as different as the Red Army Faction, Aum Shinrikyo, or FARC.The safest way to avoid attack in the age of cheap and easily available atomic, biological, and chemical weapons is to be dispersed. At least not to be part of a geographic nation state. From a military point of view a nation is about as viable as cavalry before WW1 or battleships during WW2. Recommended Link Watch here Hi Casey Team, good article debunking AGW. Kind regards.– Kevinlast_img read more

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