Lloris gets driving ban, fine for drink-driving

first_img“On 15th of July, he was the proudest man of the planet,” attorney David Sonn said in reference to the day Lloris and his France team lifted the World Cup trophy in Moscow.“Forty days later, he was arrested in central London,” said the lawer. “Today he apologises to the court.”Lloris was one of the heroes of France’s commanding march to their second football World Cup in 20 years.The triumph turned the 31-year-old into a national hero and confirmed his status as one of the most respected goalkeepers in the world.But Lloris’s dream turned into a nightmare when his Porsche was pulled over for a routine stop in central London at 2:20am on August 24.The Daily Mail tabloid said Lloris registered 100 microgrammes of alcohol per 100 millilitres of breath in a police check.The amount is roughly the equivalent of seven glasses of wine, although alcohol levels depend on multiple factors such as age, gender and metabolism.The legal driving limit in England in a breathalyser test is 35 microgrammes.“I wish to apologise wholeheartedly to my family, the club, my teammates, the manager and all of the supporters,” Lloris had earlier said in a statement.“Drink-driving is completely unacceptable, I take full responsibility for my actions and it is not the example I wish to set.”Police said Lloris nearly hit parked cars and went through a red light. They found vomit in the car after stopping him.Lloris spent seven hours in a cell that night before returning home on foot.– Taxi cancelled –France captain Lloris holding aloft the World Cup trophy © AFP / FRANCK FIFEHis lawyer said Lloris knew he should not have been driving and had called a cab after a night out.“He had booked a taxi but unfortunately the taxi cancelled at the last minute,” Sonn said. “He made a first mistake — he decided to drive.”The married father of two looked stoic and dressed impeccably in a dark suit and blue shirt as he made his way in silence through a crush of reporters into the courtroom.Lloris missed France’s opening games in the inaugural UEFA Nations League.France coach Didier Deschamps attributed his ‘keeper’s absence to a thigh injury and gave Lloris his wholehearted support.“He knows only too well that it shouldn’t happen, but it happened and it’s not going to change what I think about him and the Hugo Lloris that I’ve always known,” said Deschamps.Lloris was spectacular during the World Cup and gave up no goals in either France’s tough quarter-final match-up against Uruguay or their semi-final against a dangerous Belgium side.He blundered once in the final against Croatia but his team still prevailed 4-2.But Lloris’s London club are now left to ponder what to do with their starting keeper after his conviction for a serious driving offence.Tottenham have won three of their first four matches and are placed fifth in the English Premier League.A team spokesman said before the sentencing that Tottenham were treating the entire matter “extremely seriously”.Lloris has made 256 appearances with Tottenham since joining from the French club Lyon in 2012.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Hugo Lloris leaving court after sentencing © AFP / Tolga AKMENLONDON, United Kingdom, Sep 12 – France’s World Cup-winning captain Hugo Lloris avoided jail but received a 20-month driving ban and a Sh 7 million (£50,000) fine on Wednesday for drink-driving in central London.The Tottenham Hotspur goalkeeper had earlier called his behaviour “unacceptable” and received a lighter sentence from a judge who could have locked up the star for six months.last_img read more

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East London woman campaigns for babies born with clubfoot

first_imgNisha Varghese, who has cerebral palsy, says she knows it’s tough when you cannot walk, which is why she wants to help children born with clubfoot.Nisha Varghese has an online campaign to raise money for at least 50 children who are born with clubfoot to get treatment. Varghese (in front, left) with her mother, Anne, and Play Your Part ambassador Catherine Constantinides (right). (Images supplied)Melissa JavanNisha Varghese, who is from East London, has cerebral palsy. Despite her disabilities, the 26-year-old is always on a mission to make people’s lives better. Her latest campaign is helping children who are born with clubfoot to get treatment and have their feet fixed.MiracleFeet says clubfoot affects one in every 800 children worldwide. The American group provides organisational, technical and financial support to clinics throughout the world in order to provide treatment to children born with clubfoot.Varghese is working through MiracleFeet to raise money for children in impoverished communities in more than 20 countries, including Liberia and Tanzania.Clubfoot (or talipes equinovarus) is a congenital birth defect that causes one or both feet to turn inwards and upwards. Cerebral palsy is a condition caused by damage to a baby’s brain before or during their birth, which makes their limbs and muscles permanently weak.So far, through MiracleFeet, about 27,000 lives have been transformed in 24 countries and 194 clinics have been supported worldwide.“Children deserve opportunities”Varghese is no stranger to fundraising. She has been involved with initiatives such as the Smile Train and the Not For Sale Campaign.She came across MiracleFeet, she says, while researching charities that have sustainable impact. “I believe that all children deserve the opportunity to live to their fullest potential without the hindrance of clubfoot.“Additionally, I know how hard life is when one can’t walk and although I can’t fix my cerebral palsy, there is a cure for clubfoot. I’m going to make sure I fix every child who I can that way. My suffering is not for nothing.”Watch Nisha Varghese’s crowdfunding campaign video:Treatment for each child costs $250 (about R3,500) and already 17 children can get treated through Varghese’s crowdfunding efforts. The treatment used is the non-surgical Ponseti Method.Writer Melissa Javan spoke to Varghese.Melissa Javan: When did you start getting involved with community work and fundraising?Nisha Varghese: I started my community work and fundraising at the age of 19. In retrospect I realise that while losing myself in the service of others, I accidently found the best version of me – the me I didn’t even know I wanted to be.Nisha Varghese paraglides in Cape Town to raise awareness of people who live in Saharawi refugee camps.MJ: What is cerebral palsy?NV: Cerebral palsy is a neurological condition that affects speech and movement. [Because I have cerebral palsy] I can’t walk and my speech is sometimes difficult to understand.MJ: What are the myths around it?NV: Some people think cerebral palsy affects everybody the same way when, in fact, it affects people to varying degrees depending on how badly the brain was damaged during the injury.MJ: How do you go about setting up a fundraising campaign?NV: I contact the non-profit organisation I am interested in working with and ask if it is partnered with a fundraising platform. If the answer is yes I follow a simple sign-up process and start fundraising.MJ: What have you learned about fundraising and marketing on social media?NV: I have learned that fundraising using social media is not about the monetary goal you set or even reaching it, but rather it’s about telling a good story and conveying to people why you’re doing what you’re doing.MJ: What is the most important thing about fundraising?NV: It is knowing why you’re doing what you’re doing and attempting to convey that to the public as creatively as humanly possible.MJ: What charities have you supported in the past?NV: During 2010-2012 I raised $7,862 for The Water Project, Inc. The money was used to build a well for a community in Kenya. Since then, I have raised $1,075 for the Not For Sale Campaign, $1,088.84 for the Elton John Aids Foundation (UK), $5,307 for the Malala Fund, and $10,317.04 for Smile Train, which was enough to pay for 41 cleft-repair surgeries.Apart from fundraising I also raise awareness about causes and issues I care about. On 10 April 2017 I went paragliding in Cape Town to raise awareness about the Western Sahara. It is the last colony in Africa which has been illegally occupied – by Morocco for the past 41 years due to the fact that it is rich in natural resources. Thank you to my real-life superhero Catherine Constantinides, a Play Your Part ambassador, who made me and the rest of the world aware of this issue by literally going to the Saharawi refugee camps and living with the Saharawi people for a time.Source: Miracle Feet and CrowdriseWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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