MSOC : Freshmen defenders Thomas and Murrell bring chemistry developed in Canada to SU

first_img Published on September 14, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @chris_iseman Skylar Thomas received a rude introduction to college soccer. In his first start for Syracuse, the freshman was overwhelmed by the speed and strength of Colgate’s players.Compared to high school, it was a different game.The only form of familiarity Thomas found was in Jordan Murrell, a fellow freshman defender and his teammate on the Canadian national U-18 team. And Murrell’s presence on the field helped calm Thomas’ nerves.‘I was actually really nervous. I wasn’t used to the college game, I guess. I didn’t know what to expect,’ Thomas said. ‘It was a little sense of relief but I’m pretty sure he was as nervous as me, probably.’Thomas and Murrell have known each other almost six years, having played against each other in club soccer matches in Canada and then together on the national U-18 team earlier this year. Both have earned starting spots in their freshmen seasons at Syracuse, a goal they set together and pushed each other to accomplish.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Canadian teammates have been in the starting lineup for all of the Orange’s (2-2) four games to this point. They’ll get their first taste of a big game for Syracuse this weekend when the team plays Cal Poly (2-1-2) and No. 16 New Mexico (4-0-1) at the University of Akron Tournament.Both are still getting accustomed to this level of play, but playing against tougher competition before SU opens its Big East schedule is something head coach Ian McIntyre hopes will benefit the young defenders.‘I think Jordan and Skylar have started very well. This will also be another big test for them,’ McIntyre said. ‘… But they’re learning a lot on the job. It’s been a good start to their Syracuse careers.’The good start has been a product of the chemistry they had already established playing together in Canada. They’re friends off the field, and Thomas said having someone making the same transition to the college game helps ease the growing pains that come with it.Thomas showed his inexperience on Sunday in SU’s 2-1 overtime win over American. His mental lapse late in the game on a play in the box led to the Eagles scoring their lone goal. He said he’s still working on staying focused for all 90 minutes.But focus is one of the few parts of his game that needs improvement.During a tournament with the national team earlier this year, Thomas didn’t play much for the first half of Canada’s schedule. But when Thomas finally saw time, Murrell said he noticed a change in Canada’s defensive unit for the better.‘He came on, he made a very big impact, he held his own,’ Murrell said. ‘And after that, the whole camp, he started every game.’During their time with the Canadian team, they had no idea they’d ever be teammates at Syracuse and never discussed the possibility.But when SU assistant coach Mike Miller told Thomas he was recruiting a player named Jordan from the Toronto FC Academy, Thomas immediately knew Miller was talking about Murrell. Soon after, Thomas went on Facebook and contacted Murrell, who told him he was indeed going to play for the Orange.The teammates developed a relationship playing together for Canada. The more they played on the same field, the better they got at communicating with each other.And that level of communication has carried into their first four games for SU as starting center backs.When Thomas yells ‘watch your shoulder’ to Murrell during games, Murrell knows exactly what he’s talking about and which shoulder he needs to watch.‘When we have to mark a defender, and we both step, and we’re both talking and we’re both encouraging each other during the game,’ Murrell said. ‘We just communicate very well. Even off the pitch, we’re always hanging out and talking.’When they got to Syracuse, Thomas and Murrell talked about their individual goals for the season. Both wanted to start even though they didn’t expect to. Still, they challenged each other to work hard during the preseason to achieve their shared goal.It paid off as they outplayed their competition on the Orange defense and McIntyre made them starters.‘We made it our goal to start,’ Thomas said. ‘We put as much effort toward it as we could. We made it, I guess.’After four games, the transition has gotten easier. It’s still the same game Thomas and Murrell were playing in Canada. But when times get tough again, Thomas knows he can turn to Murrell.‘It’s good I have someone to talk to,’ Thomas said. ‘I know him as a player and as a friend, so we’re able to build on that relationship and go further.’[email protected] Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Read More »

For DACA recipients at USC, the future is unknown

first_img“I grew up here,” said Araksya Nordikyan, a recipient of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and student at USC. “I don’t know a home besides California. Our parents took a good-willed intention and a risk, and we can’t be blamed for it, because we were so young. It’s really unsettling because if I’m not allowed to call this place my home, and my home is also not where I’m from, then what is home? Where do we belong?”Nordikyan, a junior majoring in philosophy, politics and law, is one of the dozens of DACA students at USC. She said she doesn’t remember much about coming to the United States. She emigrated from Armenia with her parents when she was just 4 years old, and hasn’t been back since.Nordikyan didn’t know her immigration status until her senior year of high school. When she tried to apply for financial aid to pay for college, she realized she didn’t qualify because she isn’t a citizen of the United States. AN UNCERTAIN FUTUREAraksya Nordikyan, a junior studying philosophy, politics and law, are DACA recipients. Photo courtesy of Nordikyan.DACA is an Obama-era policy that grants work permits and deportation relief for two-year renewal periods  for undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as minors. Now, DACA recipients at USC are facing uncertainty about the security of the program — President Donald Trump issued an order on Sept. 5 last year that would have terminated the DACA program on Monday. However, federal district courts in Brooklyn and San Francisco filed injunctions against the order, and the Supreme Court declined Trump’s attempt to bypass appeals courts and reverse the injunction decision at the Supreme Court. “The uncertainty scares me — I don’t know what’s going to happen next,” Nordikyan said. “What if [Trump] cancels the program completely? What happens next? I have no clue.” Provost Michael Quick sent out a memo Monday encouraging students and staff who are DACA recipients to seek legal advice in light of increased uncertainty about the program’s continued existence.“While the more immediate threats to those in our community with DACA status are at least temporarily removed, we know this also prolongs the fear and ambiguity,” Quick said in his memo.USC President C. L. Max Nikias said he is worried about the uncertainty that Trump has created regarding DACA’s status.  He estimates that there are at least 70 to 100 DACA recipients currently attending USC. “[It] creates a lot of anxiety for these kids,” Nikias said in an interview with the Daily Trojan. “It may prevent them from concentrating on their studies.”Nikias said he identifies with students struggling with immigration issues. He came to the United States to pursue his master’s degree and subsequent Ph.D. at the State University of New York Buffalo, and he and his wife, Niki, had to go through a complex naturalization process to become American citizens. “We came to the United States a long time ago as international students to pursue the dream, for better lives, for better education,” Nikias said. “I can sympathize with the anxiety and uncertainty of an immigration status, but also I can see the benefits of education, that anyone who gets a USC degree and stays here and pursues a career, they are going to be very productive citizens of our society.” Yaneiry Barrios holds a flag | Daily Trojan file photoYaneiry Barrios, a senior studying contemporary Latino and Latin American studies and social sciences (psychology) immigrated to the United States from Guatemala when she was just a year old. “It was very hard because [my mother] migrated by herself with her one-year-old on her back,” Barrios said. Barrios said she grew up with a vague understanding that she was undocumented, but didn’t fully understand it until she tried to apply to a study abroad program in France at her high school. At that point, she realized she couldn’t because of her immigration status. Barrios said she was one of the first to apply for DACA when President Barack Obama introduced the program in 2012. “It felt good,” Barrios said. “I was the first one in my family who was able to get an actual driver’s license, and understanding that I was granted an opportunity to be legal here, even though it wasn’t [citizenship], but have the reassurance that I can stay here.”But that began to change after Trump was elected to office and began to make changes to U.S. immigration policy. “My DACA expires toward the end of September,” Barrios said. “Right now, with the uncertainty of what’s going to happen, I don’t know if I’m going to lose my DACA, or if I’m going to be able to reapply … What scares me is that if they remove DACA completely and get rid of it, what’s going to happen when I graduate?”THE RIGHT RESOURCES Graphic by Karan Nevatia | Daily TrojanThe University has set in place various initiatives to provide resources for DACA students, staff and faculty. Associate Dean of Religious Life Vanessa Gomez-Brake was appointed the central contact person to coordinate support for DACA students across campus, the Gould School of Law is hosting immigration clinics, and counseling services available to DACA students, Nikias said. “I have the opportunity as a religious leader and a chaplain to offer confidential counsel, which means anyone who walks through this door is able to feel and trust that I can keep anything they share with me confidential,” Gomez-Brake said. “As you can imagine, for those who are undocumented or even DACAmented, that is something that is very cherished, because that is something you can’t talk about with just anyone.”In terms of legal resources, the Gould Immigration Clinic’s Legal Advice Project provides assistance to USC community members — including students, staff, faculty and their family members — through legal consultation and advice, and by helping to fill out DACA renewal applications. “We’re helping DACAmented students to renew their DACA applications,” Immigration Clinic Director Niels Frenzen said. “We’re giving them individual consultations to determine whether or not they are eligible for anything else — is there something in their personal history that might allow them to pursue legal status that they didn’t know about before?”Barrios went to the immigration clinic to talk about her application with experts. “They told me what I could do, the next steps I should be [taking],” Barrios said. “I took what they told me and talked to my lawyer back home and see what she thought, and got her opinion as well, so I was able to get two sources.” The University is also reimbursing students for the $495 renewal fee for DACA, with funds from the Undergraduate and Graduate Student Governments and the Provost’s Office, according to Frenzen. Gomez-Brake said those funds will be disbursed through her and the Office of Religious Life. The University has also appointed Assistant Director of Crisis Services Beth Kebschull as the Engemann Student Health Center point of contact for DACA students, and Engemann will provide counseling services for students experiencing anxiety due to uncertainty about DACA, according to the Provost’s memo. At the same time, however, some students expressed concerns about the completeness of the University’s commitment to its DACA students and workers. Graphic by Karan Nevatia | Daily TrojanImproving Dreams, Education, Access and Success, a student organization created to empower undocumented students, held a workshop for DACA recipients on Tuesday. At the meeting, attendees discussed whether the University would continue to support them after they graduate, whether the University has a plan in place to support students if DACA is repealed in the near future and whether the University will continue to employ staff members who would no longer be authorized to work if their DACA work permits are invalidated. “After graduation, will USC just forget about us or would they still look out for us?” Valeria Resendiz, the co-executive chair of IDEAS, said. “There’s so much uncertainty surrounding DACA, we want to know that the school will keep us here, will support our education.”Barrios also said that she wants to see the University expand the pop-up DREAMer resource center that IDEAS and the American Studies and Ethnicity department created in 2017. The center’s name refers to the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act, which would have allowed young undocumented immigrants to become permanent residents had it passed through Congress. “The University should make the DREAMer Center something more official, and something that should be running continuously, because there are still students at the University who have not come out as undocumented,” Barrios said. “It should have a space for all undocumented students to study and get to know each other, because we have [Asian Pacific American Student Services], El Centro, Norman Topping, the Lavender Lounge, so if we have spaces for those groups, we should also have spaces for undocumented students.” Resendiz said that while the center is still open, it lacks the resources it needs to run efficiently. POLITICAL ACTIONAlong with the on-campus resources provided, Nikias has been working to lobby the U.S. government to develop a permanent solution with a path to citizenship for DACA recipients. “We have an Office of Federal Relations in Washington, and when I go to Washington, and actually go with a delegation of trustees, we meet with members of Congress … [on] both sides of the aisle, where we actively lobby on this issue,” Nikias said. Nikias has also made his case to the media — he’s done interviews with CNBC and the Washington Post and published an op-ed in The Hill last month calling for a bipartisan presidential commission on immigration.“For so long, this has been a political issue without a face,” Gomez-Brake said. “It’s really important for us to remember that these are our fellow students, our fellow humans, they are like anyone else on campus, and they have the same needs.”last_img read more

Read More »

Garon Park wins GolfMark Club of the Year 2013

first_img8 Feb 2013 Garon Park wins GolfMark Club of the Year 2013 Garon Park Golf Club in Essex has completed a remarkable revival by winning the prestigious title of GolfMark Club of the Year 2013, supported by COBRA-PUMA GOLF. It’s a triumph for co-owner Alan Walker, who bought the club from the administrators in May 2010, and for his team. “We are absolutely chuffed, this is a wonderful achievement for a club which was in the doldrums three years ago. “This will boost morale at the club and tell everybody that we are something special,” said Alan, a past captain of the PGA and a PGA Master Professional. He was accompanied at the awards dinner by PGA professional Ben Jones and the club’s junior organisers Micky and Carol Pearson. They have all played key roles in the success of the 27-hole complex, which is now a thriving centre offering opportunities for all. This England Golf award, which is now in its fifth year, recognises golf clubs that make an outstanding and innovative contribution to junior and beginner golf, showing a willingness to improve and develop.   The award was announced at the England Golf Partnership’s County Golf Development Conference at Holywell Park Conference Centre at Loughborough University.  The conference also applauded the two runners-up, Upton by Chester Golf Club in Cheshire and Leamington & County Golf Club in Warwickshire. Alan Walker told the audience how the GolfMark experience – which led to Garon Park receiving a High Achiever award – had been the foundation of the club’s success story.  “Opportunities arose and we decided to take them,” he said. Mr Walker’s connections with Garon Park go back to 1994, when he designed the course and ran the club for five years, before selling it. He jointly bought it back after hearing it had gone into administration and decided the way forward was to “get to the backbone of the game, junior golfers.” In 2010 there were just five juniors, today the club has 115, encouraged by the “passion and commitment” of Micky and Carol Pearson, and enjoying protected fees and a range of coaching and teaching programmes, offered by Ben Jones and his team of professional coaches for the junior section. Next the club turned its attention to beginner golf and set a target of bringing 100 novices into the game last year. They exceeded that by 50 players and have set themselves a target of 250 new beginners this year. “Through the ‘Get into golf’ programme and our own version of ‘Get further into golf’ and ‘Get into playing golf’, we have made our market,” said Alan. The club works closely with Essex County Golf Partnership and is committed to growing the game and their business. The secret, says Alan, is: “Doing the basics and seeing them through. We are passionate about people and we make them feel very, very welcome.” Presenting the award, Craig Verrinder, UK Marketing Manager for COBRA PUMA GOLF, said: “We are delighted to be able to recognise Garon Park for their outstanding efforts in providing a golf facility that truly supports the development of the game. “Golf is changing and the ability to offer venues that are inclusive and fun for golfers of all abilities is key to enhancing golf participation within the community.   “COBRA PUMA GOLF are proud to continue supporting the GolfMark programme and helping golf grow across the UK.” England Golf is delighted that COBRA-PUMA GOLF support the GolfMark award scheme and provide prizes for the Club of the Year award and quarterly and annual prize draws. Richard Flint, Golf Development Manager for England Golf, commented “It is great to see the success that GolfMark clubs can have, particularly in these challenging times. Garon Park has adapted, become more business and customer focused and with their flexible, welcoming approach have become a truly inclusive facility”. “The golfing landscape has changed and it is important that golf clubs monitor and react accordingly.  England Golf continues to invest in resources, such as GolfMark and their County Golf Partnership network, to ensure golf clubs can benefit to maximum effect.” Contenders for the 2013 award were nominated by their County Golf Partnerships and a shortlist was drawn up by a panel of England Golf Partnership (EGP) representatives. Individual visits were made to the final three clubs to determine the winner. Any affiliated golf club can apply to work through the GolfMark process and achieve the accreditation, by visiting www.golfmark.org  There are currently 620 golf clubs with GolfMark and a further 545 working towards accreditation.  England Golf is currently reviewing the GolfMark initiative to support and recognise golf clubs in both business and development.  It is expected that GolfMark will be re-launched in late 2013. GolfMark is an EGP initiative which is part of its ‘Whole Sport Plan’ for golf and an integral part of its vision to ‘Grow the Game’. Caption: (from left) Alan Walker, Craig Verrinder, Carol and Micky Pearson, and Ben Jones.last_img read more

Read More »

Don’t give your storage away

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCThe delayed and slow harvest progress has helped corn and bean prices by keeping basis levels higher than normal. A slow harvest also keeps futures prices from sliding because when sales across the scale are more gradual, there is less burden on logistics and end users can grind through more old crop before new crop is available.Some end users are concerned there won’t be enough low-priced grain after harvest, so they’ve been aggressive with basis bids. End users know when harvest is complete and the bin doors are closed, it will take some coaxing to motivate farmers to sell.Often farmers are too focused on cash prices and don’t pay enough attention to their storage expenses. However, if farmers want bigger premiums and profits, they need to think about grain marketing differently than conventional wisdom. This is especially true in years when grain prices are at or under breakeven points. The following illustrates a mistake many farmers make who do not have 100% on-farm storage capacity.Many farmers make their first, and maybe only, sale before harvest for December delivery. December prices are usually a few cents higher than harvest delivery, and this allows farmers to capture some market carry premium while coring their bins during the winter. This might make sense for farmers with 100% on-farm storage, but for farmers who don’t have full storage on their farm, it is usually a mistake.For example, let’s say that cash corn prices in May for harvest delivery were $4.25 while December delivery was $4.35. This meant there was a 10-cent market carry premium for farmers to hold their grain until after harvest for 2 months (i.e. 5 cents/month). Wanting to take advantage of this additional premium, a farmer could have sold some of the corn they planned to store at home for December delivery.However, if corn is now under $3.90, that same farmer probably doesn’t want to sell corn off the combine for the lower price. Since this farmer doesn’t have 100% on-farm storage, they will have to pay storage fees at a commercial facility for around 5 cents/month waiting for prices to increase.Put another way, this farmer will likely wipe away all market carry profits from the original trade on grain storage fees waiting for higher prices on the stored corn delivered at harvest in a commercial facility. If this farmer has to wait 6 months after harvest looking for a big rally, they would probably incur 30 cents in storage fees. In the end this farmer is 20 cents behind (i.e. 10 cent profit on the original market carry sale of stored bushels, less the 30-cent storage fee of un-priced grain in commercial storage).For those farmers that don’t have 100% on-farm storage, it would have been better to make that first sale for harvest delivery and continue to make more harvest sales as desired. This approach allows for more flexibility and profit potential.For example, many end users will allow farmers to move harvest delivery sales forward (later) in time, and probably will pay the farmer a premium to do so. That’s because the market pays a premium to hold grain in storage and not be paid right away for it (i.e. market carry) as well as basis usually increases after harvest. Since the end user hasn’t paid the farmer for their grain yet, and it’s harder to buy bushels after harvest than mid-harvest, it might be to the end user’s best interest to work with a farmer for a post-harvest delivery price premium.While coring bins was part of the consideration with selling December originally, most farmers could wait until February or even March to do so, which provides another 2 to 3 months of free on-farm storage. This allows even more time for prices to rally on any un-priced grain and for farmers to take advantage of increased basis potential post-harvest.Since most farmers don’t know when, where and how much grain should be moved at harvest, I recommend pairing storage planning and using futures sales instead of cash sales, because it allows me to keep marketing plans flexible. It’s difficult for farmers without 100% on-farm storage to estimate their storage needs before harvest, so making sales with futures instead of cash sales allows me to move grain any time of year (i.e. harvest, December, etc.). This flexibility helps when acres don’t get planted, yields are lower than usual, or record production means moving more unplanned grain at harvest than expected.Often, farmers don’t know their exact production until the middle of harvest, and by then they can miss a lot of opportunities. That’s why planning and flexible marketing strategies can help to minimize farm operation risk and maximize profit potential. Please email [email protected] with any questions or to learn more. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results.last_img read more

Read More »

9 months agoBurnley fullback Taylor: Players are behind Hart

first_imgBurnley fullback Taylor: Players are behind Hartby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBurnley fullback Charlie Taylor says the players are behind Joe Hart.Hart, who had played in each of the first 19 league games this term, was dropped after the Everton match and Burnley have instead had Tom Heaton in goal for the last two league outings.Taylor said when asked about Hart: “Joe is a top professional and a top player.”We have a lot of top-class goalkeepers here and only one can play, so it’s a tough decision for the manager, and he made the call of putting Tom back in.”I think everyone would say Joe has played really well this season and is unlucky to lose his place, but that’s football, and Tom has come in and results have happened.”It’s unlucky on Joe, but he’s not changed anything around the place – he’s still a top pro, a top player and is brilliant to have in the dressing room.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More »

Canadas relationship with Indigenous peoples deteriorated over past decade UN report

first_imgAPTN National News OTTAWA–Canada’s relationship with Indigenous peoples has deteriorated over the past decade, a report by the UN rapporteur responsible for investigating the human rights situation of Indigenous peoples.James Anaya, the UN rapporteur on the rights of Indigenous peoples, found that “human rights problems faced by Indigenous peoples in Canada have reached crisis proportions.”The report  also found that the relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples was getting worse.“The relationship between the federal government and Indigenous peoples is strained, perhaps even more so than when the previous special rapporteur visited Canada in 2003,” said the report. “Despite certain positive developments that have occurred since then and the shared goal of improving conditions for Indigenous peoples.”Anaya visited Canada in the fall of 2013, touring communities in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia. He also met with federal officials, including Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt and the RCMP.According to his report, Canada talks the talk of reconciliation, but it doesn’t walk the walk.“The government of Canada has stated a goal of reconciliation, which the special rapporteur heard repeated by numerous government representatives with whom he met,” said the report. “Yet, even in this context, in recent years, Indigenous leaders have expressed concern that progress toward this goal has been undermined by actions of the government that limit or ignore the input of Indigenous governments and representatives.”Anaya found that the economic conditions of Indigenous peoples has remained unchanged over the past decade.“The most jarring manifestation of these human rights problems is the distressing socio-economic conditions of Indigenous peoples in a highly developed country,” wrote Anaya. “Although in 2004, the previous special rapporteur recommended that Canada intensify its measures to close the human development indicator gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians in health care, housing, education, welfare and social services, there has been no change in the gap.”Aboriginal Affairs Minster Bernard Valcourt, however, viewed the report as validating Canada’s handling of Indigenous issues.“The report published by the special rapporteur today acknowledges that, while many challenges remain, many positive steps have been taken by the Government of Canada to improve the overall well-being and prosperity of Aboriginal people in Canada,” said Valcourt, in a statement. “Our numerous laws, policies and programs aimed at addressing Aboriginal peoples’ concerns allow for a positive collaboration with Canada’s Aboriginal and Northern communities as we work together on shared priorities and towards a renewed relationship built on reconciliation and trust.”Anaya’s report also calls on Canada not to push through natural resource projects unless there is “free, prior and informed consent.” The report lists several projects which face concerns from impact First Nations communities, including Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline project, the Alberta tar sands and shale gas exploration near Elsipogtog First Nation.The report recommends that Ottawa extend the Truth and Reconciliations Commission’s mandate for as long as it needs to finish its work and provide compensation to all residential school survivors.“The government should ensure that the mandate of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is extended for as long as may be necessary for it to complete its work,” said the report. “And should consider establishing means of reconciliation and redress for survivors of all types of residential schools.”Ottawa has refused to compensate former residential school survivors who went to day schools, were taught in sanitariums or were boarded out.In his report, Anaya criticized Ottawa’s treatment of the Mohawks of Akwesasne who are forced to go through customs checkpoints without ever leaving Canada. Akwesasne straddles the Canada-U.S. border.“The federal government should work with Indigenous peoples in international border areas, in particular the Mohawk nation of Akwesasne, to remove barriers to their free movement within their traditional territories,” said the report.The report also calls on Ottawa to call an inquiry into the high number of murdered and missing Indigenous [email protected] (PDF, Unknown)last_img read more

Read More »

Amazon plans to open new distribution centre in Edmonton area hire 600

first_imgNISKU, Alta. — Online retail giant Amazon.com Inc. is opening a new distribution centre in Leduc County, just south of Edmonton, with plans to create 600 full-time jobs by 2020.The e-commerce company says the approximately 92,900-square-metre (one-million-square-foot) centre in Nisku, Alta., will be the company’s 11th distribution facility in Canada, and its second in Alberta.It already operates a similar facility in Rocky View County in southern Alberta, where it employs more than 1,500 full-time workers.Amazon’s other fulfillment facilities are located in British Columbia and Ontario.The Seattle-based company says workers at the new centre will be responsible for picking, packing and shipping larger items such as outdoor equipment, patio furniture and bicycles.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Read More »

Voting starts in second round of Mauritania elections

first_imgNOUAKCHOTT – Voting started on Saturday in the second round of Mauritania’s legislative and council elections.Some 56 seats are up for grabs in the runoff voting, which is being contested by eight parties, including the ruling Union for the Republic Party.Around 67 political parties contested 147 legislature seats in the first round of the elections on November 23.The runoff pits the ruling party against the seven other parties in a heated contest over the seats of the nine constituencies of Nouakchott as well as seats in other major Mauritanian cities. The leftist Popular Progressive Alliance, the National Assembly for Reform and Development, the political arm of the Muslim Brotherhood in Mauritania, and Al-Wiam Democratic and Social Party have hammered an agreement to coordinate together in the runoff, according to a statement by the three parties, a copy of which was attained by Anadolu Agency.The ruling Union for the Republic and allied parties won 60 seats of the 147-member parliament in the first round of the vote, while the opposition grabbed only 31 seats.The 11-party Coordination of Democratic Opposition had boycotted the vote, citing the use of state resources to campaign for the ruling party.By Sidi Ould Abdel-Maleklast_img read more

Read More »

Ohio State womens volleyball splits weekend matches against Illinois and Northwestern

Senior outside hitter Kaitlyn Leary (11) gets set before a serve during a match against Illinois Nov. 22 at St. John Arena. OSU lost, 3-1.Credit: Tim Moody / Lantern reporterStill fighting to grasp a semblance of tournament life, the Ohio State women’s volleyball team picked up a much-needed win against Northwestern, after falling to Illinois one night before.The Buckeyes (17-13, 5-13) topped Northwestern (16-14, 8-10), 3-0, Saturday in a late-night match.First serve was pushed back from 7 to 8:30 p.m. because a 3:30 p.m. kickoff for Ohio State’s football team.Senior defensive specialist Julianne Mandolfo said her team came in knowing it needed at least one win over the weekend, and hoping to redeem themselves against the Wildcats.“(Northwestern) beat us when we went there and we were extremely frustrated,” she said of the Oct. 16 match. “So we came in here and we weren’t going to let them play with us.”OSU jumped out to a 20-14 lead in the first set and never looked back, eventually winning 25-16. Senior outside hitter Kaitlyn Leary led the way with 7 kills and just 1 error in the opening period.From there, the Buckeyes went up, 7-2, in the second before the Wildcats pushed back. The Scarlet and Gray were eventually able to pull out a 26-24 win.After that, OSU fell behind, 7-3, early in the third, but fought back to take a 12-11 lead. The Buckeyes eventually finished off the sweep, 25-18.“It was a great start to finish match,” coach Geoff Carlston said. “The kids did the game plan perfectly. It’s exactly how we drew it up, exactly how we wanted to play.”Leary posted 23 kills on the night to lead the way as the Buckeyes finished with a .298 attacking percentage as a team, compared to the Wildcats’ .148. Sophomore outside hitter Katie Mitchell added 10 kills while junior setter Taylor Sherwin had a match-high 46 assists.“(Sherwin) put me in really good situations with their setter being up,” Leary said. “She kept giving me the ball and setting me where I needed to be set.“She did a really good job this weekend.”The victory against Northwestern came on the heels of a Senior Night loss to No. 20 Illinois Friday. OSU came out playing well, but eventually fell 20-25 in the first set. The Buckeyes followed that up with a 25-17 victory in the second, but could not hold the momentum as they dropped the final two sets (21-25, 20-25).Leary led all players with 16 kills, finishing the match with a .324 attacking percentage, while freshman middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe and junior outside hitter Erin Sekinger each tallied 13 kills.Carlston employed a two-setter approach against Illinois, as Sherwin tallied 27 assists and freshman setter Maggie Heim added 23. Mandolfo led all players with 26 digs.After the match, OSU’s three , Leary, Mandolfo and libero Davionna DiSalvatore were honored during Senior Night festivities.Even though the team lost on Senior Night, Mandolfo said it felt good to get at least one win out of the weekend.The three seniors will have one more chance to play in St. John Arena, though. OSU is scheduled to wrap up its home schedule Wednesday against No. 2 Penn State. The Buckeyes are set to travel to Iowa City, Iowa, after their date with the Nittany Lions for their regular-season finale against Iowa Saturday. read more

Read More »

Football Looking ahead to Ohio States seasondefining matchup against Penn State

OSU then-freshman defensive end Nick Bosa (97) and other dejected Buckeyes return to the locker room after their 24-21 loss against Penn State on Oct. 22. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Former Photo EditorBoth No. 6 Ohio State (6-1, 4-0 Big Ten) and No. 2 Penn State (7-0, 4-0 Big Ten) will head to Ohio Stadium at 3:30 p.m. Saturday for their biggest respective challenges to date. With major playoff implications on the line, this matchup will be what defines the remainder of the season for both teams. Here is a preview of the upcoming game. Ohio State offense vs. Penn State defenseWhen most people think about Penn State, they immediately direct their attention to the offense led by Heisman hopeful running back Saquon Barkley and quarterback Trace McSorley. However, a major component of Penn State’s recent success has come in the form of its defense. To this point, the defensive efforts have largely been the product of one of the best secondaries in the nation. Led by two Thorpe Award semifinalists, safety Marcus Allen and cornerback Grant Haley, the Nittany Lions’ secondary is tied for the Big Ten lead with nine interceptions on the year while placing second in the conference with only 167.6 passing yards allowed per game. The defense has allowed only three passing touchdowns all season, none in the past two games. The Buckeyes might not find it much easier to run the ball against Penn State either as the Nittany Lions have allowed opponents an average of just 115.3 yards per game, 17th-fewest in the nation. With a stout defensive front led by defensive ends Shareef Miller and Shaka Toney, Penn State is fourth in the nation with an average of 8.4 tackles for loss and 3.4 sacks per game. Miller has contributed seven tackles for loss and three sacks while Toney has six tackles for loss and 3 1/2 sacks. Perhaps no one on the defensive side of the football stands out more than linebacker Jason Cabinda. The 6-foot-1, 234-pound senior paces the team in total tackles (53), has forced and recovered a fumble and has recorded four sacks and two tackles for loss.Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer spoke about how much of a challenge the defensive front presents Ohio State and did not originally single out any one player in particular, but he made sure to praise the standout linebacker of the Nittany Lions.“The one guy that steps up big time is [Cabinda],” Meyer said on the Big Ten coaches teleconference Tuesday. “You see him all over the place. But to say one D-lineman is better than the other, I can’t do that. I just think they’re well coached and go extremely hard.”This will be the most potent offense Penn State faces this season, but at the same time, this will be the most talented defense the Buckeyes have faced to this point. Ohio State is ranked No. 12 in passing offense (326.7 yards per game) and No. 18 in rushing offense (250.6 yards per game), and has seemed to be hitting its stride as of late, outscoring opponents 266-56 over its last five games. The Buckeyes’ passing attack is unlike those that Nittany Lions have faced this season. It is an offense that derives most of its success from shorter passes and relying on blocking rather than beating the defenders downfield. Still, neither the Penn State defense nor the Ohio State offense have been sufficiently tested this season, with the exception of Week 2 when the Buckeyes mustered only 16 points against Oklahoma. Ohio State defense vs. Penn State offensePenn State’s offense features so many potent weapons, it’s often tough to keep track of them all. Head coach James Franklin’s team has the nation’s best running back in Barkley, a mammoth tight end in Mike Gesicki, who creates all sorts of matchup issues, and a dual-threat quarterback in McSorley, who can make plays with his arm and his legs.Barkley has been a weapon for Penn State in all areas of the game. The junior running back has a passing touchdown, eight rushing touchdowns, three receiving touchdowns and returned a kickoff for a touchdown. He leads the nation in all-purpose yards with 1,478, as he is Penn State’s leading rusher, receiver and primary kickoff returner. Junior linebacker Jerome Baker, who could be asked to defend Barkley one-on-one in the passing game, said Barkley is a fun player to watch, and he is excited for the challenge of possibly stopping stop the Heisman favorite Saturday.“The dude’s a monster. He’s a good back. I just like watching him, honestly,” Baker said Tuesday. “Very excited to go against him because he can do it all. Pass block, run routes, he can definitely run the ball, jump over you, run through you. I’m excited.”Despite the big-name playmakers on the roster, Penn State’s offensive statistics don’t jump out on the page. The Nittany Lions average only 173.4 rushing yards per game (54th in the nation) and 289.9 passing yards per game (25th), both falling short of the numbers Ohio State has this season despite Penn State being heralded as one of the best offenses in the nation and Ohio State as one that has struggled. Overall, Ohio State is tied for the most points scored per game (47.3) while Penn State is only at 16th with 40. While some of that will likely be chalked up to strength of schedule, Ohio State has been ranked as the 15th-toughest schedule to date while Penn State is only at 18th, according to Team Rankings.The struggles for the offense have most likely come from the one surprising weak spot for the Nittany Lions: the offensive line. Entering the year with lofty expectations as a strong, veteran core of players, the group has not done an effective job protecting McSorley. The unit has allowed the 35th-most sacks per game in the nation (2.57) and has surrendered the sixth-most tackles for loss (8.14).This offensive line will be forced to step up in a big way against a defensive line that has turned offensive linemen into revolving doors all season long. Ohio State averages the 32nd-most sacks per game (2.57) and fifth-most tackles for loss (8.3). What should be an area of concern for Penn State is the fact the Buckeyes’ defensive line is fresh, coming off a bye week following five weeks where each starter was out before the fourth quarter. Not to mention enough depth to allow for essentially four starters at every position.Redshirt senior defensive end Tyquan Lewis said at this point in the season, he feels well-rested and ready for what will be his team’s most important game this season.“I think the most plays I’ve played all year, so far, well since Oklahoma, it’s probably like 30, 33, something like that,” Lewis said Tuesday. “It’s been kind of low since then. But it’s just you feel fresh, it’s a lot of reps off your body. Now it’s the meat of the season with a stretch, so now you know you have to play at least 50 plays.”Penn State’s offense will put up plenty of points, but the play up front could be what separates the Nittany Lions from a win and a loss. The team has plenty of playmakers who can burn the Buckeyes with the ball in their hands, but that will only happen if the line can protect McSorley and provide space for Barkley to break into the secondary. Ohio State’s secondary can be exploited and has been throughout the year when matched up against an above-average passing offense. But if McSorley is pressured in the pocket, it could be more challenging for him to get off the passes needed to beat Ohio State. In this case, the best passing defense might not come from Ohio State’s secondary, but rather on the defensive line. Predictions:Edward Sutelan: Penn State wins 27-24Colin Hass-Hill: Ohio State wins 45-31 read more

Read More »