Journalist still fears for safety although suspect held for his attempted murder

first_img to go further April 27, 2021 Find out more HondurasAmericas Organisation Joaquín Molina Andrade, 28, was placed in pre-trial detention on 18 July after being brought before a court in the northern city of Puerto Cortés for the attempted murder of JBN TV’s local correspondent, Selvín Martínez, a week earlier in the same city.However, Martínez, who was already the target of a murder attempt in April, is not reassured by Molina’s detention.“My fear has grown since we realized that Molina belongs to a gang of killers,” Martínez told the Committee for Free Expression (C-Libre), a Reporters Without Borders partner organization. “The person who masterminded the attack on me is still at large.”Reporters Without Borders said: “Martínez and his family must urgently be given the protection they have requested and continue to await. The authorities have a clear responsibility. Molina’s arrest does not mean the case has been solved. On the contrary, his evidence should enable much more progress to me made.”Almost all of the 29 murders of Honduran journalists in the past decade remain unpunished. No fewer than 24 of these murders have taken place since the June 2009 coup d’état.____________13.07.12 – Radio reporter gunned down and TV journalist shot at for second timeAdonis Felipe Bueso Gutiérrez, a reporter for the Christian radio station Radio Stereo Naranja, was shot dead with two of his cousins on 8 July in Villanueva in the northern department of Cortés while on holiday visiting his family.He was to have taken part in celebrations on 21 July marking the first anniversary of the station, located in Sonoguera in the department of Colón. His death brings to 29 the number of journalists killed in Honduras in the past decade, of whom 24 have died since the coup d’état on 28 June 2009.“The motive has yet to be determined in this case, despite the fact that some of the victims’ belongings had disappeared, which supports the theory that it was a robbery,” Reporters Without Borders said. “However, the possibility that it was connected with his work cannot be ruled out.“In each of these cases that has plunged the profession of journalism into mourning, the same impunity applies, whether they are attributable to the country’s high crime rate or the political violence spawned by the coup. “So far, the only investigation that has yielded real progress is the one into the death of Alfredo Villatoro.“The authorities should take similar action in all other instances of crime and threats, which constantly afflict journalists, human rights activists and other citizens who provide news and information.” July 20, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist still fears for safety although suspect held for his attempted murder Bueso and his cousins Francisco Ireata López, 20, and 18-year-old Miguel Ángel Gutiérrez Coto were forced into a car by armed men as they left an Internet café in Villanueva about 6 pm. Their bullet-riddled bodies were found in the street half an hour later. Their wallets had been stolen and the tennis shoes worn by one of them had also been taken. Also in the Cortés department, television reporter Selvín Martínez, who works for the station JBN, was the target of a shooting attack yesterday for the second time in less than two months. His home was machine-gunned in April and this time an unidentified gunman fired at him as he was riding his motorcycle to his daughter’s school, according to the Reporters Without Borders partner organization C-Libre.Martinez, who was unhurt, said he counted 12 shots. He believed the perpetrator to be the leader of one of the criminal gangs in Central America known as “maras”, who have a reputation for extreme violence. In May this year, the journalist’s wife escaped a kidnapping attempt. Reporters Without Borders calls for the immediate implementation of protective measures as requested by Martínez for himself and those close to him. News News RSF_en RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin Americacenter_img Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Honduras HondurasAmericas 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies December 28, 2020 Find out more May 13, 2021 Find out more Reports Receive email alerts RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” Newslast_img read more

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Pasadena Views Real Estate Team Expands

first_img Business News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Herbeauty10 Of The Most Notorious Female Spies In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Is What Happens To Your Face After DermaplaningHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeauty More Cool Stuff Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  9 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Irina Netchaev, real estate expert and founding broker, Pasadena Views Real Estate Team Inc. is proud to announce that Leslie Bohling and Marissa Joven joined her team.Leslie Bohling brings her entrepreneurial experience and a passion for helping others achieve their dreams. She was born in Sweden and speaks Swedish and Tagalog. Leslie is a nature lover and feels right at home in Pasadena/Altadena area. Her love of California with all it has to offer, makes her a perfect real estate agent for relocating home buyers.Marissa Joven has an extensive background in marketing and negotiating. Her past experience includes managing advertising, marketing and social media campaigns. Recently, she has been immersed in helping home buyers and sellers with navigating the purchase and selling process. Marissa prides herself in her professionalism, negotiation and eye for detail in working with clients.Pasadena Views Real Estate Team Inc. is a boutique real estate firm specializing in residential real estate. The company focuses on implementing the latest technology, along with old fashioned customer service and negotiation skills. “We have been very fortunate to have been recognized by our past clients via multiple 5-star reviews on Yelp and Google+. These reviews have catapulted our growth and allowed us to hire these two exceptional real estate agents to assist in servicing our existing and new real estate clients.” says Netchaev.To learn more about real estate opportunities, including a free home search, in Pasadena and Los Angeles county, please contact Irina Netchaev at (626) 629-8439 and visit http://www.PasadenaViews.com for more information.center_img Subscribe First Heatwave Expected Next Week Top of the News Make a comment Community News Commercial Real Estate News Pasadena Views Real Estate Team Expands Irina Netchaev, founder of Pasadena Views Real Estate Team Inc. is proud to announce the addition of two real estate agents to her team. Leslie Bohling and Marissa Joven will bring negotiation, customer service and marketing skills and help Pasadena Views be of service to more home buyers and sellers. From STAFF REPORTS Published on Friday, August 1, 2014 | 2:25 pm faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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For new medicines, turn to pioneers

first_imgWould we be wise to prioritize “shovel-ready” science over curiosity-driven, fundamental research programs? In the long term, would that set the stage for the discovery of more medicines?To find solid answers to these questions, scientists at Harvard and the Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research (NIBR), publishing in Science Translational Medicine, looked deep into the discovery of drugs and showed that, in fact, fundamental research is “the best route to the generation of powerful new medicines.”“The discoveries that lead to the creation of a new medicine do not usually originate in an experiment that sets out to make a drug. Rather, they have their origins in a study — or many studies — that seek to understand a biological or chemical process,” said Mark Fishman, one of three authors of the study. “And often many years pass, and much scientific evidence accumulates, before someone realizes that maybe this work holds relevance to a medical therapy. Only in hindsight does it seem obvious.”Fishman is a professor in the Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, a faculty member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, and former president of NIBR. He is a consultant for Novartis and MPM Capital, and is on the board of directors of Semma Therapeutics and the scientific advisory board of Tenaya Therapeutics.CRISPR-cas9 is a good example of discovery biology that opened new opportunities in therapeutics. It started as a study of how bacteria resist infection by viruses. Scientists figured out how the tools that bacteria use to cut the DNA of an invading virus could be used to edit the human genome, and possibly to target genetic diseases directly.The origins of CRISPR-Cas9 were not utilitarian, but those discoveries have the potential to open a new field of genomic medicine. Blood pressure medicines would never have been created without the discovery of the role of renin (a renal extract) in regulating blood pressure in 1898. Blood pressure medication is another example of how fundamental discoveries can lead to transformative medicines.People who suffer from high blood pressure often take drugs that act by blocking the angiotensin-converting enzyme. Those medicines would never have been created without the discovery of the role of renin (a renal extract) in regulating blood pressure in 1898, or without the discovery of angiotensin in 1939, or without the solid understanding of how the enzyme works, shown in 1956.This work was not tied earlier to making pills for hypertension, mainly because hypertension was generally believed to be harmless until the 1950s, when studies showed its relationship to heart disease. Before then, the control of blood pressure was itself a fundamental science, beginning with Stephen Hales’ measurement  of blood pressure in a horse in 1733.The discovery of ACE inhibitors really reflects the convergence of two fields of fundamental, curiosity-driven discovery.Yet some observers believe that projects that can demonstrate up front that they could produce something useful should take priority over projects that explore fundamental questions. Would there be many more medicines if academics focused more on programs with practical outcomes? How would that shift affect people in the future?To find answers, Fishman and his colleagues investigated the many scientific and historical paths that have led to new drugs. The study they produced is a contemporary look at the evidence linking basic research to new medicines.The authors used a list of the 28 drugs defined by other scientists as the “most transformative” medicines in the United States between 1985 and 2009. The group examined:Whether the drug’s discovery began with an observation about the roots of disease;Whether the biologist believed that it would be relevant to making a new medicine; andHow long it took to realize that.To mitigate bias, the researchers repeatedly corroborated the assignment with outside experts.They found that eight out of 10 of the medicines on their list led back to a fundamental discovery — or series of discoveries — without a clear path to a new drug.The average time from discovery to new drug approval was 30 years, the majority of which was usually spent in academia, before pharmaceutical or biotechnology companies started the relevant drug development programs.Fishman concluded, “We cannot predict which fundamental discovery will lead to a new drug. But I would say, from this work and my experiences both as a drug discoverer and a fundamental scientist, that the foundation for the next wave of great drugs is being set today by scientists driven by curiosity about the workings of nature.”What industry and academic leaders sayLeaders in biomedicine from industry, business, and academia warmly welcome this new body of evidence, as it supports the case for funding curiosity-driven, non-directed, fundamental research into the workings of life.“This perspective on drug discovery reminds all of us that while many in both industry and academia have been advocating for a more rational approach to R&D, the scientific substrate we depend on results from a less than orderly process. The impact of basic research and sound science is often unpredictable and underestimated. With several telling examples, the authors illustrate how they can have a ripple effect through our field.”– Jean-François Formela, M.D., Partner, Atlas Venture“The paper presents a compelling argument for investing in fundamental, curiosity-driven science. If it often takes decades to recognize when a new discovery should prompt a search for targeted therapeutics, we should continue to incentivize academic scientists to follow their nose and not their wallets.”– George Daley, M.D., Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Caroline Shields Walker Professor of Medicine, and Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School“There is a famous story of a drunk looking for his lost keys under a streetlight because the light is better there. As Mark reminds us, if we only look for cures where the light has already shone, we will make few if any new discoveries. Basic research shines a light into the dark corners of our understanding, and by that light we can find wonderful new things.”— Dr Laurie Glimcher, M.D., President and CEO of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Richard and Susan Smith Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School“The importance of fundamental discovery to advances in medicine has long been a central tenet of academic medicine, and it is wonderful to see that tenet supported by this historical analysis. For those of us committed to supporting this pipeline, it is a critical reminder that young scientists must be supported to pursue out-of-the-box questions and even new fields. In the end, that is one of the key social goods that a research university provides to future generations.”— Katrina Armstrong, M.D., M.S.C.E., Physician-in-Chief, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital“Human genetics is powering important advances in translational medicine, opening new doors to treatments for both common and rare diseases at an increasingly rapid pace. Yet, these discoveries still require fundamental, basic scientific understanding into the drug targets’ mechanism of action. In this way, the potential of the science can be unlocked through a combination of curiosity, agility, and cross-functional collaboration to pursue novel therapeutic modalities like gene and cellular therapies, living biologics, and devices. This paper illustrates the value of following the science with an emphasis on practical outcomes and is highly relevant in today’s competitive biopharmaceutical environment, where much of the low-hanging fruit has already been harvested.”– Andy Plump, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Medical and Scientific Officer, Takeda Pharmaceutical Co.“Medicine depends on scientists asking questions, collectively and over generations, about how nature works. The evidence provided by Fishman and colleagues supports an already strong argument for continued and expanded funding of our nation’s primary source of fundamental science: the NIH and the NSF.”– Douglas Melton, Ph.D., Xander University Professor at Harvard, Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and co-director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute“Just as we cannot translate a language we do not understand, translational medicine cannot exist without fundamental insights to be converted into effective therapies. In their excellent review, Fishman and his colleagues bring the factual evidence needed to enrich the current debate about the optimal use of public funding of biomedical research. The product of public research funding should be primarily fundamental knowledge. The product of industrial R&D should be primarily transformative products based on this knowledge.”— Elias Zerhouni, M.D., President Global R&D Sanofi, former Director of the National Institutes of Health, 2002-2008“Fundamental research is the driver of scientific knowledge. This paper demonstrates that fundamental research led to most of the transformative medicines approved by the FDA between 1985 and 2009. Because many genes and genetic pathways are evolutionarily conserved, discoveries made from studies of organisms that are highly tractable experimentally, such as yeasts, worms, and flies, have often led to and been integrated with findings from studies of more complex organisms to reveal the bases of human disease and identify novel therapeutic targets.”– H. Robert Horvitz, Nobel Laureate; David H. Koch Professor, Member of the McGovern Institute for Brain Research and of the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator at Massachusetts Institute of Technology“This meticulous and important study of the origin of today’s most successful drugs finds convincingly that the path to discovery lies through untargeted fundamental research. The authors’ clear analysis is an effective counter to today’s restless investors, academic leaders, and philanthropists, whose impatience with academic discovery has itself become an impediment to the conquest of disease.”— Marc Kirschner, John Franklin Enders University Professor, Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School“Some ask if there is a Return on Investment (ROI) in basic biomedical research. With transformative therapies as the ‘R,’ this work traces the path back to the starting ‘I,’ and repeatedly turns up untargeted academic discoveries — not infrequently, two or more that are unrelated to each other. Conclusion? A nation that wants the ‘R’ to keep coming must maintain, or better, step up the ‘I’: that is, funding for curiosity-driven, basic research.”— Keith Yamamoto, UCSF molecular biologist and Vice Chancellor, Science Policy and Strategylast_img read more

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Gazprom, Lukoil talk gas cooperation

first_imgImage courtesy of GazpromRussian companies, Gazprom and Lukoil discussed the advancement of prospects for the collaboration in the areas of gas supplies, transmission and processing.The two companies are bound by a 2014-2024 general agreement on strategic partnership under which Lukoil supplies gas to Gazprom’s transmission system.The parties also take part in the development of the Tsentralnoye field in the Caspian Sea, Gazprom reminded in its statement.In October 2015, associated petroleum gas started flowing to Gazprom’s Sosnogorsk gas processing plant from the northern group of fields developed by Lukoil-Komi. Prior to that, Gazprom and Lukoil implemented a joint project for rearranging the gas supply scheme for consumers within the Pechora industrial cluster.last_img

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Carthage Deputy Town Marshal faces charges after burglary investigation

first_imgRushville, In. — In early April around 11:30 p.m., an off duty Carthage Deputy Town Marshal, Jonathan R. Hancock, 38, interrupted a burglary in progress at a local business in Carthage.  Hancock, who lives near the business, confronted three suspects as they were coming out after breaking in, identifying himself as a police officer.  The suspects began to flee on foot during which time the officer gave chase and fired shots, but none of the suspects were struck.One juvenile suspect was caught and taken into custody, but the other two suspects fled and are still at large. The Rush County Sheriff’s Department is conducting the burglary investigation, and the Indiana State Police were requested by the Rush County Prosecutor’s Office to conduct an investigation into the shots fired.After the shots fired portion of the investigation was completed by Detective Sergeant Scott Jarvis it was turned over to the Rush County Prosecutor’s Officer for their review. After their review, a warrant for the charges of Level 6 Felony Criminal Recklessness with a Deadly Weapon; Level 6 Felony Impersonation of a Public Servant; Level 6 Felony Official Misconduct of a Public Servant and Level 6 Felony Pointing a Firearm at Another was issued for John Hancock.The Impersonation of an Officer charge stems from Hancock not completing his yearly Indiana Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) required training in 2018, to remain certified as a police officer in Indiana. Hancock turned himself in at the Rush County Jail today and later bonded out.  This is all the information available for release, and any further questions should be referred to the Rush County Prosecutor’s Office.last_img read more

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Garon Park wins GolfMark Club of the Year 2013

first_img8 Feb 2013 Garon Park wins GolfMark Club of the Year 2013 Garon Park Golf Club in Essex has completed a remarkable revival by winning the prestigious title of GolfMark Club of the Year 2013, supported by COBRA-PUMA GOLF. It’s a triumph for co-owner Alan Walker, who bought the club from the administrators in May 2010, and for his team. “We are absolutely chuffed, this is a wonderful achievement for a club which was in the doldrums three years ago. “This will boost morale at the club and tell everybody that we are something special,” said Alan, a past captain of the PGA and a PGA Master Professional. He was accompanied at the awards dinner by PGA professional Ben Jones and the club’s junior organisers Micky and Carol Pearson. They have all played key roles in the success of the 27-hole complex, which is now a thriving centre offering opportunities for all. This England Golf award, which is now in its fifth year, recognises golf clubs that make an outstanding and innovative contribution to junior and beginner golf, showing a willingness to improve and develop.   The award was announced at the England Golf Partnership’s County Golf Development Conference at Holywell Park Conference Centre at Loughborough University.  The conference also applauded the two runners-up, Upton by Chester Golf Club in Cheshire and Leamington & County Golf Club in Warwickshire. Alan Walker told the audience how the GolfMark experience – which led to Garon Park receiving a High Achiever award – had been the foundation of the club’s success story.  “Opportunities arose and we decided to take them,” he said. Mr Walker’s connections with Garon Park go back to 1994, when he designed the course and ran the club for five years, before selling it. He jointly bought it back after hearing it had gone into administration and decided the way forward was to “get to the backbone of the game, junior golfers.” In 2010 there were just five juniors, today the club has 115, encouraged by the “passion and commitment” of Micky and Carol Pearson, and enjoying protected fees and a range of coaching and teaching programmes, offered by Ben Jones and his team of professional coaches for the junior section. Next the club turned its attention to beginner golf and set a target of bringing 100 novices into the game last year. They exceeded that by 50 players and have set themselves a target of 250 new beginners this year. “Through the ‘Get into golf’ programme and our own version of ‘Get further into golf’ and ‘Get into playing golf’, we have made our market,” said Alan. The club works closely with Essex County Golf Partnership and is committed to growing the game and their business. The secret, says Alan, is: “Doing the basics and seeing them through. We are passionate about people and we make them feel very, very welcome.” Presenting the award, Craig Verrinder, UK Marketing Manager for COBRA PUMA GOLF, said: “We are delighted to be able to recognise Garon Park for their outstanding efforts in providing a golf facility that truly supports the development of the game. “Golf is changing and the ability to offer venues that are inclusive and fun for golfers of all abilities is key to enhancing golf participation within the community.   “COBRA PUMA GOLF are proud to continue supporting the GolfMark programme and helping golf grow across the UK.” England Golf is delighted that COBRA-PUMA GOLF support the GolfMark award scheme and provide prizes for the Club of the Year award and quarterly and annual prize draws. Richard Flint, Golf Development Manager for England Golf, commented “It is great to see the success that GolfMark clubs can have, particularly in these challenging times. Garon Park has adapted, become more business and customer focused and with their flexible, welcoming approach have become a truly inclusive facility”. “The golfing landscape has changed and it is important that golf clubs monitor and react accordingly.  England Golf continues to invest in resources, such as GolfMark and their County Golf Partnership network, to ensure golf clubs can benefit to maximum effect.” Contenders for the 2013 award were nominated by their County Golf Partnerships and a shortlist was drawn up by a panel of England Golf Partnership (EGP) representatives. Individual visits were made to the final three clubs to determine the winner. Any affiliated golf club can apply to work through the GolfMark process and achieve the accreditation, by visiting www.golfmark.org  There are currently 620 golf clubs with GolfMark and a further 545 working towards accreditation.  England Golf is currently reviewing the GolfMark initiative to support and recognise golf clubs in both business and development.  It is expected that GolfMark will be re-launched in late 2013. GolfMark is an EGP initiative which is part of its ‘Whole Sport Plan’ for golf and an integral part of its vision to ‘Grow the Game’. Caption: (from left) Alan Walker, Craig Verrinder, Carol and Micky Pearson, and Ben Jones.last_img read more

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Slippery Rock’s Andre Freeman ready to ‘D’ up in NFL

first_imgANDRE FREEMAN When Andre Freeman stood up and walked towards me I knew it. And you would know it too. This guy is special. First the million dollar smile hits you and then see what the NFL clearly sees. the 6’0 190 pound 22 year old defensive cornerback from Slipper Rock University has all the tools needed to make his mark on the NFL. And Andre didn’t gain the size or the skills by accident. Mr. Freeman Sr. was set to make his mark on Sundays with the Buffalo Bills back in 1986 when life took him in another direction including a fabulous family.Further evidence of great things to come came when “Elite Sports and Entertainment Management Co.,” owned and operated by Five Starr Corporation introduced the All-Conference grad to Sports Entertainment Management Group LLC operated by partners Eddie Edwards Jr. and Dwayne Woodruff (former two time Steelers Super Bowl Champion and All-Pro Cornerback).Numerous NFL scouts think that Freeman is the real deal and ironically the Buffalo Bills are showing strong interest in him.Freeman, who just returned from playing in the Hansen Bowl in Virginia Beach, has no doubt he can play at the next level and only needs to pack on another 10 pounds of muscle and drop his 40 yard dash down from a 4-4 to a 4-3 and he’s set to go.Based on all “The Rock” has told me about Andre coupled with his near perfect attitude and work ethic, I said he can’t miss on the gridiron but just in case he graduates with a degree in Safety Management. Not to mention the fact that you know how we Rock Grads roll. You got Ron Hunt, Jeff Lake, Chuck Sanders, “Flyin Myron” Brown and yours truly to clearly show you that failure is not a option.last_img read more

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Watch: José Mourinho walks away from interviewer who tries to bait him into answering…

first_imgImage Courtesy: Twitter(@GMS__Football)Advertisement 6jx1kNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsbye22Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ew746( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) rWould you ever consider trying this?😱cnnuCan your students do this? 🌚086oRoller skating! Powered by Firework José Mourinho, once the most feared gaffer all around the European continent, is not having the best phase of his managerial career at the moment, and as seen in the FIFA’s The Best awards event, the ‘Chosen One’ is favouring to walk out from unfavourable questions.Advertisement Image Courtesy: Twitter(@GMS__Football)Since being sacked by the Manchester United hierarchy back in December 2018, the Portuguese has not been welcomed by any of the European elites, even though having work experience at Chelsea, Inter Milan and Real Madrid.The current pundit for Sky Sports, Mourinho showed he does not facour questions regarding his break from a managerial job, as he takes leave from further questions being thrown at him in the award ceremony.Advertisement Check out the bizarre interview in the video below, courtesy to the official Twitter handle of GiveMeSport.Dreaming about a job as the manager of an imaginary ‘World XI’ team, the 56 year old told that Fabio Capello and Walter Zenga, who were present at the award ceremony, are also potential candidates to manage the said ‘dream team’, as they are also out of job.Soon after, Mourinho’s body language indicated that he was done with the questions, and as the interviewer thanked him for his honesty, he walked off the stage.“You have to stay here with me! Why do you want to go?” the lady presenter’s plea to stop Mourinho failed, and she ended with saying “Okay, you want to go.”Social Media stepped up after the clip went viral, as football fans suggested that the interviewer didn’t do the best of her job on stage, and Mourinho was right to make a prompt exit. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Asbury Park’s Trio of Treasures

first_imgBy Mary Ann BourbeauASBURY PARK – Grand Central Station, with its glorious main concourse and Beaux-arts façade, may be getting a lot of attention in 2013 as it celebrates its 100th year. But there is a trio of treasures in Asbury Park that was designed by the same architectural firm.Warren and Wetmore brought its vision to the historic shore resort when they built the Paramount Theatre, Grand Arcade and Convention Hall.Workers restore the rosette ceiling of the Paramount Theatre in Asbury Park.Hopefully, those buildings will continue to draw tourists for another 100 years, but right now their future is uncertain. In 2007 Madison Marquette, a real estate investment firm, signed on to bring back the original splendor of the complex. While many structural and aesthetic improvements have been made, the 2011 deadline to install a state-mandated sprinkler system has long passed. Madison Marquette now says the cost, in excess of $1 million, is prohibitive, especially after Super Storm Sandy caused more than $1 million in damage. An agreement reached with the city allows the firm to forego installing sprinklers and close the building if continued operation of the complex is not economically feasible.“We are engaged in conversations with city officials on this issue, and are hopeful that we can find a way to modify how the building is currently used, comply with all code requirements and continue to keep some or most of this great building open to the public,” said Anselm Fusco, senior vice president of Madison Marquette.Pending the outcome of these conversations, no events have been scheduled in the complex after May 1.Since signing on to rebuild Asbury Park’s waterfront, Madison Marquette took on the daunting task of bringing the Paramount back to the splendor that Warren and Wetmore designed. The company made significant restorations to the historical details both inside and out. The crumbling plaster was repaired and the leaky domed ceiling was brought back to its original grandeur. Ripped seating was replaced, technical and mechanical systems were brought up to date and ornamentation was refurbished. Upgrades were made to the plumbing and air conditioning in Convention Hall, and portions of its architectural glory were restored.“When you walk through these buildings, you are taken aback by their beauty,” Fusco said. “There are even design details in areas not seen by the public, and that speaks volumes to the craftsmanship that went into these iconic buildings.”The design started with Whitney Warren, a cousin of the Vanderbilts, who studied architecture in Paris and loved the city so much he lived there for 10 years. When he returned to New York in 1896, he partnered with Harvard graduate Charles Wetmore to form the Warren and Wetmore architectural firm. They first gained prominence when they designed the New York Yacht Club in 1900.Their first high-profile commission was Grand Central Station, which opened in 1913. Their vision brought about the Steinway, Helmsley and Crown buildings; Chelsea Piers; St. James Theater; and the Biltmore, Ritz-Carlton and Vanderbilt hotels in New York.They also designed Michi­gan Central Railroad, the Ritz-Carlton in Atlantic City and the Louvain Library in Belgium, which was destroyed by the Germans during World War I, according to New York Architecture’s website.The inside of the 1,600-seat Paramount Theatre including the balcony and projection area.Meanwhile, back in Asbury Park, a group of local businessmen, hotel owners and city officials toyed with the idea of building a 5,000-seat structure along the boardwalk, but the $500,000 price tag proved too costly. According to the National Register of Historic Places, 10 years passed before any further action was taken and by then, building estimates had quadrupled. By the time Warren and Wetmore submitted their bid in 1927, the cost was more than $3 million, according to the National Register of Historic Places. But the plan was approved in the hopes it would help to draw even more tourists to the tony shore resort.“Asbury Park was the upper echelon of the social circle, so I’m sure they were used to the best,” said Angie Sugrim, promotion specialist for Madison Marquette. The complex, which was completed in 1930, was designed in Italian and French themes with an emphasis on nautical motifs.In the 1,600-seat Para­mount Theatre, one can’t help but notice the sea serpents, mermaids and shell designs in the ironwork, on the seats and on the painted dome ceiling. The outside brickwork features scallop shells and other nautical artwork. Several large copper schoon­ers and lanterns are positioned high up on the balconies. Many of the molds that were used for the plaster work are still in the theater, readily available for use in future renovations.“A lot of care went into designing this place,” said Brandon Vaught, maintenance supervisor for the complex. “I like how every day I find something new in the details.”High up in the rafters is the projection area, where five original film projectors, each 6-feet tall by 6-feet long, sit dusty and untouched. Graffiti signatures fill the concrete walls, some from recent acts that have graced the stage, including the Bouncing Souls and Blue October, and others that date back to the 1930s. Musicians must love the acoustics that Warren and Wetmore included in the domed theater because even today, it provides superior sound for the artists. Sugrim said that during a performance a few years ago, Tony Bennett demonstrated this by singing a song to the audience without a microphone.“The Paramount was built with the idea that the room had to amplify itself,” she said.Rumors run rampant that the buildings are haunted. Some say the ghosts are victims of the S.S. Morro Castle, a cruise ship that once sailed between New York and Havana. On Sept. 8, 1934, the ship caught fire and came to rest on a sandbar in front of Convention Hall. Many of the 137 victims were brought inside the auditorium. Others think the hauntings could be the spirits of two cabaret showgirls who died in a dressing room fire in the Paramount Theatre many years ago. Dressing room No. 8, down at the end of a long, narrow hallway, remains in its burned-out state and the door is always kept locked.“The buildings are definitely haunted,” Sugrim said. “We all hear things, and some of us see things.”The Grand Arcade features restaurants and shops that sell shore decorations, jewelry and Asbury Park memorabilia. It connects The Paramount Theatre, which faces Ocean Avenue, and Convention Hall, located on the beach side.The lobby of the Paramount Theatre.The grandeur of the Paramount design is missing from Convention Hall, but it still has a personality of its own. It was once home to a 700-pipe Kilgen organ, which was used to provide accompaniment for silent movies. Winged seahorse designs can be seen when entering the auditorium, which holds 3,600 people and hosts various events such as concerts, sporting events, tattoo festivals, fishing flea markets and roller derbies.“It’s nice to have a big room like this and make it into whatever you want,” Sugrim said.The nautical theme runs throughout Convention Hall, with two long paintings on either side of the stage featuring striped bass and jellyfish in an ocean scene. Though the water in the paintings is not real, the water that flowed in from Super Storm Sandy was. The basements of all three buildings, where all of the electrical panels are located, were completely flooded and about a foot of water covered the ground floors. The roof and arcade doors sustained damage, beachside stairs separated and sand was piled 5 feet high in the Grand Arcade.“Relatively speaking, we had a lot less damage than the rest of the shore,” Sugrim said.last_img read more

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First-ever “Reggae on the River” concert at Hurakabra River Resort

first_imgHurakabra River Resort will be hosting the first ever ‘Reggae on the River’ concert featuring the popular and internationally recognised Guyanese reggae group ‘First Born’.The event will be held on Saturday, September 17 and coincide with the arrival of the Yachts from the Annual Nereid’s Rally.Fifteen yachts are currently in the Essequibo River off Hurakabra, having left Trinidad a few days ago. The boats will remain in Guyana until September 19 before they leave for Suriname and French Guyana.The concert and fun day is being staged to encourage Guyanese participation in the Rally; participants will be able to mingle and interact with the cruisers.Tickets for the event cost ,000 and are available at Nigel’s Supermarket, Vinu’s Shoebox, and White Castle Fish Shop. Interested persons can call 226-0240/225-3557 for more information.Ticket holders will board the bus at the National Cultural Centre, Homestretch Avenue, on September 17 at 09:00h.For Bartica residents, tickets for lunch and concert will cost ,000 (in advance) from Neighbourhood Pharmacy and Williams Grocery. Barticians will have to arrange their own transportation to the Resort.last_img read more

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