Belgian bill threatens investigative journalism

first_img RSF_en November 23, 2020 Find out more This view is shared by the General Association of Belgian Professional Journalists (AGJPB-AVBB), which wrote to Reynders on 14 August voicing concern about the bill’s impact on freedom of expression. Ten RSF recommendations for the European Union Organisation BelgiumEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsMedia independenceProtecting sources CorruptionWhistleblowers News RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive The government has said the bill would be amended before being resubmitted to the cabinet and parliament. August 20, 2019 Belgian bill threatens investigative journalism Didier Reynders, foreign affairs and defence minister / AFP Proposed by Didier Reynders, Belgium’s minister for foreign affairs and defence, the bill was hardly noticed when it was approved by the cabinet in early May. As it stands, it makes no exceptions although not everyone would face the same penalty. Under article 22 of the bill, journalists could be fined up to 5,000 euros while whistleblowers would face a possible five-year jail term. Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on the Belgian authorities to exempt journalists andwhistleblowers acting in the public interest from a proposed law under which divulgingclassified information would be punishable by up to five years in prison. December 2, 2020 Find out more In an opinion issued in late June, Belgium’s Council of State warned that the bill’s broad wording could violate jurisprudence on the right to information stemming from the European Convention on Human Rights. “In its current form, this bill could criminalize investigative journalism and threaten the Belgian public’s right to information,” said Pauline Adès-Mével, the head of RSF’s European Union and Balkans desk. “The government must restore a balance between press freedom and the protection of classified information or else Belgium’s ranking in RSF’s World Press Freedom Index could be affected.” to go further Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU BelgiumEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsMedia independenceProtecting sources CorruptionWhistleblowers June 2, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Belgium News Receive email alerts News Belgium is ranked ninth out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. Newslast_img read more

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OUSU candidates in website controversy

first_imgThe OUSU presidential election had a turbulent first week with all three main contenders involved in website controversy.After Reclaim OUSU came under fire for an unfortunate website gaffe last week, with Nathan Akehurst’s page telling viewers that “Nathan sucks really bad”, Jane4Change has been accused of “stealing” from the website of design company Mixd. The Jane4Change website has since been taken down.The remarkable similarity of the two sites prompted Mike Danford, the creative director of Mixd, to claim that Jane4Change had “stolen” from their website and that Will Neaverson, who designed the website, “shouldn’t have done it”. He also commented that some of the Jane4Change website was still drawing on the hosting resources of the original design, consuming some of their bandwidth. Danford stressed that the code had been carefully adapted in a process that obviously required some skill.Jane Cahill was quick to distance herself from the process of the website design, commenting to Cherwell, “Our team were not aware of the technicalities of website, we didn’t have a huge number of resources to put together a sophisticated software for this election. The website editor has apologised to the company involved which is right and we have taken down the design.”Rival president candidate Alex Bartram, however, felt it cast doubts on the efficacy of Cahill as a potential president commenting, “Jane4Change haven’t been able to put a website up for their campaign on a budget of over £200 without using somebody else’s. How they’ll manage to run a Student Union and get a whole new building with an uncosted plan is entirely unclear.”Nathan Akehurst was equally dismissive, saying, “It’s surprising that such a carefully planned political machine is capable of such a basic mistake. I would just sincerely like to express my hope their policies are more original than their website and their team name.”Alex Bartram has also been criticised this week for his use of ‘NationBuilder’, an advanced tool for political campaigns utilised by major political parties for national elections. The tool allows users to accumulate large amounts of data in order to conduct more targeted campaigning, for example by sending specific policies to specific groups of people. Bartram said that he was excited by using the tool for the campaign, commenting, “We think its capacity for information storage is incredibly useful even for a (relatively) small-scale campaign like the OUSU elections.What it means is we can match up a huge amount of different people with the specific policies, areas, or interests that we’re addressing, and really target our campaign on the basis of that.”The other, candidates, however, expressed bewilderment at using such a sophisticated piece of software for a student election.Jane Cahill of Jane4Change commented, “We find it amusing that a candidate who claims he is not a typical student politician is using an invasive technology which the Labour party uses to stuff people’s inboxes with targeted mailings and to manipulate Facebook newsfeeds.Firstly, it’s weird to use that in a student union election, and secondly I don’t want to see elections decided by the quality of software over the quality ideas and experience. More broadly, we wouldn’t be comfortably holding as much information on students as it required to, say, target an email on a sports policy, or an academic policy.”Nathan Akehurst of Reclaim OUSU was also sceptical about the use of the website, commenting “I don’t think using advanced software in a student union election is necessary, and if what I’ve heard about privacy issues is correct then it is worrying. At the end of the day, nothing beats a face to face conversation about what we want out of our union, and that’s what I hope these elections will be won on.”Bartram, however, was keen to stress that NationBuilder would not allow Team Alex to access any private information from Facebook profiles.One Wadham student commented on the election that they were “shocked” and “confused” about how “the dark games of politics had transcended into OUSU”.last_img read more

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Strategic questions to ask at this year’s planning session

first_imgQuestions and answers. They are a key part to developing any strategy. Ask the wrong strategic questions and it doesn’t matter what your answer is. Answer the right questions the wrong way and it doesn’t matter what the question is.With On the Mark Strategies’ planning process, we conduct a pre-session survey of attendees. This gets everyone thinking and saves time during the meeting. This year more than ever, the questions you ask are critical.Asking the same “canned” questions year after year is also not a wise idea. As you prepare your Post Pandemic Plan you must look beyond the current crisis.So what are the best strategic questions to ask this year? Here are a few ideas along with why they are critical: ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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Will prevented planting play into markets?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCFriday’s USDA report confirmed what the market already knew. Near perfect growing conditions last year in the highest producing areas around the world has generated too much corn and soybean supply in the U.S and globally. Unfortunately, due to problems with the African Swine Fever in Asia and the China trade war, demand has decreased. And, it’s unlikely either will be resolved before the end of the year.Right now, the new crop market is likely overvalued, especially if most areas are planted on time and trend line yields are produced. But the big variable now is weather. Forecasts for the Dakotas and the eastern Corn Belt show a possible break in rain this week, but more rain is expected next weekend. This may mean farmers in those areas will wait for better planting conditions or take prevent plant. The Dakotas only have until May 25, and the eastern Corn Belt until June 5, before they have to declare if they are taking prevent plant on corn.Will farmers in these areas still plant? That is the billion-dollar question, and I don’t think the market has fully addressed this. Right now, economics suggest that farmers should NOT push to plant their crop, IF they haven’t applied nitrogen to fields yet, which many haven’t been able to do.Obviously, this goes against the long-held belief that a farmer needs to plant crops to make money. But essentially farmers right now are incentivized to NOT plant crops this year. The futures values for both corn and bean are certainly under the cost of production.What if a farmer doesn’t plant? Based upon conversations with crop insurance agents and farmers, depending on the average yield and insurance coverage purchased earlier this year, farmers could expect to receive around $300 to $400 per acre. In areas still dealing with excessive rain, these types of payments could cover a farmer’s cash rent payments and weed control costs for the rest of the year. A farmer also receives this money right away as to waiting until after harvest. This could help with cash flow issues and allow the unpriced farmer to store their grain until or even after harvest waiting for better prices.If a farmer does try to plant corn, it’s possible they could end up losing money for both any remaining unpriced corn in the bin and any unpriced new crop corn they are about to plant, if prices don’t go back up.Will farmers really not plant corn or will they just switch to beans? I think some farmers will minimize their farm operation’s risk and not plant corn this year. I don’t think many will switch crops. Bean prices need to increase at least $1 per bushel for farmers to just breakeven.Will farmers take prevent plant for beans? It’s hard to say yet. Bean prevent plant decision dates are about two weeks after the corn dates, so there is still too much time to know.If farmers are incentivized to NOT plant, will more be considering prevent plant? From what I understand, there doesn’t seem to be any hard rules for how the claims process works. Basically, the insurance companies determine if farmers could have planted in their area, so prevent plant isn’t necessarily a guaranteed payment to farmers. Still, there are a lot of areas that could be covered. Farmers should work with their crop insurance agents to determine if their area might be covered.So, how many corn acres will ultimately get planted? It’s hard to say at this point. While no two years are ever the same, 1995 had some historical similarities to current conditions. In 1995, the U.S. loss about 4 million corn acres from March planting intentions to the final acres planted. If we use the same type of acres at today’s yields it equals about 700 million bushels (4 million acres x 175 yield).A 700-million-bushel reduction to the 2.4-billion-bushel projected carryout (May USDA report) would leave 1.7 billion bushels, the tightest carryout since 2013.On the surface this sounds very bullish, but it really isn’t. If this happened and futures rallied more than 30 cents, export demand and ethanol grind would likely slow, ultimately increasing carryout. Plus, the wheat supply is also high with Kansas City futures below $4. Wheat could easily replace corn for feed in parts of the southern plains.Is there an upside? Yes, the national average yield in 1995 was 5 bushels per acre lower than trend-line, due to poor summer weather. In other words, the variability and unpredictability of weather can still be a big factor. If the summer weather is too wet, too much nitrogen could be leached from the soil. If the summer is too dry, corn root systems may be too shallow, which could compromise yield. Both of these scenarios could be the match that lights a fire under the markets.What’s next?The market will be waiting until May 25 to see how much of the Dakotas will take prevent plant and what the 10-day weather forecast for the eastern Corn Belt will be. It would be hard for me to plant corn unless there is optimal conditions in those areas if I had not yet applied nitrogen as there is a high potential for losing money at this point planting corn. If I thought a market rally was likely due to wet conditions, there are risk management tools available that would allow me to participate in a rally without actually putting seed in the ground.What about your farm? Our farm in southeast Nebraska missed much of the recent rains. We finished planting our corn and beans last week. Still, it’s been cool recently, so it’s uncertain if some areas will need to be replanted. Please email [email protected] with any questions or to learn more. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results.last_img read more

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Don’t give your storage away

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCThe delayed and slow harvest progress has helped corn and bean prices by keeping basis levels higher than normal. A slow harvest also keeps futures prices from sliding because when sales across the scale are more gradual, there is less burden on logistics and end users can grind through more old crop before new crop is available.Some end users are concerned there won’t be enough low-priced grain after harvest, so they’ve been aggressive with basis bids. End users know when harvest is complete and the bin doors are closed, it will take some coaxing to motivate farmers to sell.Often farmers are too focused on cash prices and don’t pay enough attention to their storage expenses. However, if farmers want bigger premiums and profits, they need to think about grain marketing differently than conventional wisdom. This is especially true in years when grain prices are at or under breakeven points. The following illustrates a mistake many farmers make who do not have 100% on-farm storage capacity.Many farmers make their first, and maybe only, sale before harvest for December delivery. December prices are usually a few cents higher than harvest delivery, and this allows farmers to capture some market carry premium while coring their bins during the winter. This might make sense for farmers with 100% on-farm storage, but for farmers who don’t have full storage on their farm, it is usually a mistake.For example, let’s say that cash corn prices in May for harvest delivery were $4.25 while December delivery was $4.35. This meant there was a 10-cent market carry premium for farmers to hold their grain until after harvest for 2 months (i.e. 5 cents/month). Wanting to take advantage of this additional premium, a farmer could have sold some of the corn they planned to store at home for December delivery.However, if corn is now under $3.90, that same farmer probably doesn’t want to sell corn off the combine for the lower price. Since this farmer doesn’t have 100% on-farm storage, they will have to pay storage fees at a commercial facility for around 5 cents/month waiting for prices to increase.Put another way, this farmer will likely wipe away all market carry profits from the original trade on grain storage fees waiting for higher prices on the stored corn delivered at harvest in a commercial facility. If this farmer has to wait 6 months after harvest looking for a big rally, they would probably incur 30 cents in storage fees. In the end this farmer is 20 cents behind (i.e. 10 cent profit on the original market carry sale of stored bushels, less the 30-cent storage fee of un-priced grain in commercial storage).For those farmers that don’t have 100% on-farm storage, it would have been better to make that first sale for harvest delivery and continue to make more harvest sales as desired. This approach allows for more flexibility and profit potential.For example, many end users will allow farmers to move harvest delivery sales forward (later) in time, and probably will pay the farmer a premium to do so. That’s because the market pays a premium to hold grain in storage and not be paid right away for it (i.e. market carry) as well as basis usually increases after harvest. Since the end user hasn’t paid the farmer for their grain yet, and it’s harder to buy bushels after harvest than mid-harvest, it might be to the end user’s best interest to work with a farmer for a post-harvest delivery price premium.While coring bins was part of the consideration with selling December originally, most farmers could wait until February or even March to do so, which provides another 2 to 3 months of free on-farm storage. This allows even more time for prices to rally on any un-priced grain and for farmers to take advantage of increased basis potential post-harvest.Since most farmers don’t know when, where and how much grain should be moved at harvest, I recommend pairing storage planning and using futures sales instead of cash sales, because it allows me to keep marketing plans flexible. It’s difficult for farmers without 100% on-farm storage to estimate their storage needs before harvest, so making sales with futures instead of cash sales allows me to move grain any time of year (i.e. harvest, December, etc.). This flexibility helps when acres don’t get planted, yields are lower than usual, or record production means moving more unplanned grain at harvest than expected.Often, farmers don’t know their exact production until the middle of harvest, and by then they can miss a lot of opportunities. That’s why planning and flexible marketing strategies can help to minimize farm operation risk and maximize profit potential. Please email [email protected] with any questions or to learn more. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results.last_img read more

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Florida Rolls Back Efficiency Goals

first_imgUtilities argue electricity consumption has plunged on its ownFrom Duke’s point of view, power use had already declined dramatically.Since the last state-required energy goals were established in 2009, Duke said, Florida “has experienced the most severe economic recessing since the Great Depression,” resulting in an overall decrease in electricity use by Duke customers of nearly 14 percent. That’s one of the steepest declines in the country, Duke added, where the average drop in energy use has been 0.1 percent.Florida regulators recognized last year that consumers were already reducing the amount of power they used, the utility said, but it wasn’t necessarily due to conservation programs.Duke added that Florida’s energy-efficiency efforts are well established, and that Duke’s own efficiency programs have saved customers more than $1.25 billion on energy bills and offset the need to built 17 power plants since 1981.“While other states have only recently begun energy-efficiency efforts, Duke Energy has been actively promoting energy-efficiency efforts in Florida since the oil embargo in the last 1970s,” Ivey said. “As a result, many of the efficiency savings other states may be seeing now, we in Florida reaped those benefits and savings decades ago.” Lower goals for energy savingsUnder state law, commissioners set 10-year conservation goals for each utility, and utilities respond with specific programs they will use to meet the goals, Sterling Ivey, a spokesman for Duke Energy Florida, wrote in an email. Commissioners can ask a utility to add, drop, or modify a particular program.Conservation programs might target such things as duct sealing, attic insulation upgrades, heat pump replacement, reflective roofing, and upgrades to wall insulation and windows.In its decision last week, the commission was voting on new goals for reductions in electrical consumption for affected utilities — reduction efforts which regulators call “demand-side management.” In Duke’s case, Sterling said, the new 10-year conservation goal is 195 gigawatt-hours, exactly what Duke had proposed.Five years ago, the conservation goal for Duke was 3,205 gWh.Two other utilities affected by the ruling got just what they had requested, far below the goals recommended by two intervenors. Only Flower Power & Light was overruled by the commission, which set a conservation goal of 526 gWh instead of the utility’s proposed goal of 59 gWh. Florida’s Public Service Commission has voted to trim energy efficiency goals sharply and to end solar equipment rebates by the end of next year.According to an article in the Tampa Bay Times, the panel voted 3 to 2 late last month in support of the proposals from the state’s big utilities, which also had the support of the commission’s staff.Utilities had urged deep cuts in energy efficiency programs and an end to solar equipment rebates on the grounds that neither program was cost-effective. The newspaper said that the utility owners argued that it is now cheaper for them to produce electricity than it is to pay for programs designed to conserve it. (This is exactly the opposite conclusion of a recent report from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which found the cost of energy conservation programs is about half of what it cost to generate power at a conventional coal-burning power plant.)The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) categorized the rollbacks as “stunning” when compared with the energy goals that the commission established only six years ago.The commissioners agreed to schedule workshops on improving solar energy, but the Tampa newspaper said that might not be enough to prevent a legal challenge to the most recent vote. SACE executive director Stephen Smith was quoted as saying that the commission’s vote might amount to a violation of state law. Solar incentives are “not cost-effective”Florida utilities offered a variety of incentives for photovoltaic (PV) and solar hot-water systems, including a $2 per watt rebate for residential PV systems, with a $20,000 maximum payout. Investor-owned utilities wanted the rebates to end; others, including the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, didn’t.Between 2011 and 2013, investor-owned utilities wrote rebate checks totaling $49.7 million for about 5,600 residential and commercial PV and solar hot-water projects.But the programs treated non-solar customers unfairly, the utilities argued.“The [investor-owned utilities] all agree that the solar pilot programs were not cost-effective and the general body of ratepayers — in particular, non-participants — have been subsidizing the incentives provided to participants installing solar PV,” the commission’s staff analysis reads.In recommending that solar pilot programs be allowed to expire at the end of 2015, the staff agreed with one utility witness who said, “It is simply not a responsible use of taxpayer dollars to promote these programs under any cost-effective test.”“The programs are not cost-effective and experience gained since the last goals proceeding indicates that consumers have continued to install systems without any rebates,” the staff concluded. “The current solar rebates represent a large subsidy from the general body of ratepayers to a very small segment of each utility’s customers.” New power plants are approvedWhile energy efficiency and solar rebates get the boot, the Tampa Bay Times said, “utilities will go into the holidays with their biggest wishes this year, including billions of dollars in new power plants that will come online in the next decade.”That includes a $1.5 billion natural gas plant that Duke Energy wants to build to take the place of the Crystal River nuclear power station and two coal-burning units.The newspaper pointed out that Florida is fighting a trend that is helping other states save energy. In Vermont, for example, energy efficiency efforts — such as subsidies for high-efficiency light bulbs — have helped the state meet more than 2 percent of its annual energy needs through conservation. “In Florida,” the newspaper said, “the number is 0.25 percent — and now dropping.”SACE also had sharp words for the commission. A statement issued after the vote said in part, “Florida’s power companies use a host of methods, rejected long ago by the majority of U.S. utilities and commissions, to support their anemic proposed goals, including arbitrarily eliminating all efficiency measures that have the highest energy savings to customers…“The line between the [Public Service Commission] and the monopoly utilities they are charged with regulating has become increasingly blurred. The massive amount of money poured into political contributions and lobbying by the state’s monopoly utilities is clearly paying off at the PSC — to the detriment of customers. It’s time we removed the word ‘Public’ from the agency’s name.”last_img read more

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Standhardinger, Ravena, Teng banner 2017 PBA Draft class

first_imgLATEST STORIES Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf PLAY LIST 01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Fil-foreign bets Jason Perkins from La Salle and Davon Potts of San Beda are also seen to be first round picks.Kia will be selecting first from the pool on Draft Day on October 29 at Robinson’s Place Manila, followed by NLEX at second and Blackwater at third.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Fil-German Standhardinger, the tallest prospect at 6-foot-7, is expected to get drafted at the top.College standouts who are also hoping to make the leap are Rey Nambatac and Jom Sollano of Letran, Sidney Onwubere of EAC, Lervin Flores of Arellano, Ervin Grospe of JRU, Dan Sara of San Beda and Gab Dagangon of Perpetual. View comments BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF presidentcenter_img There’s also a considerable amount of Fil-foreign hopefuls joining the fray, namely Robbie Herndon of Wangs Basketball, Julian Sargent and Zach Nicholls of Marinerong Pilipino, Andreas Cahilig of Cignal HD, and Felix Apreku of Racal, all of whom saw action in the past PBA D-League season.Rounding out the initial draft list are: JK Casiño of CEU; Thomas Torres of La Salle; Mac Tallo of SWU; Monbert Arong and Arvie Bringas of FEU; Kyle Neypes of NU; Dave Moralde of UP; Louie Vigil of UST; Gwynne Capacio and Chris de Chavez of Ateneo; Fil-Indonesian guard Biboy Enguio, Emil Palma, and JR Sumido of UE; Joseph Nalos and Lloyd Abrigo of Adamson; Jebb Bulawan and Wilson Baltazar of Lyceum; Joseph Gabayni of Racal; Jayson Grimaldo of Victoria Sports-MLQU; Jon Gabriel of Colegio de San Lorenzo and Marinerong Pilipino; Michael Juico of San Sebastian and Wangs Basketball; Elmer Cabahug of Flying V; Jerome Ortega of AMA Online Education; and less-heralded applicants Jeremiah dela Peña and Christian Geronimo.All 45 applicants have to go through the Draft Combine, set a week prior to the draft, before making the final list.ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa UST sweeps elims, advances to UAAP beach volleyball finals Read Next Christian Standhardinger. Photo from Fiba.comProjected number one pick Christian Standhardinger and homegrown standouts Kiefer Ravena and Jeron Teng lead the 44 players who made themselves available for the 2017 PBA Rookie Draft before Thursday’s 5 p.m. deadline.Raymar Jose and Jett Manuel, both of whom suited up for Chooks-to-Go Pilipinas in the recently-concluded 2017 Fiba Asia Champions Cup at Chenzhou, China, are also among the aspirants.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READlast_img read more

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Magnolia rallies to beat Rain or Shine in Game 7, books finals rematch with SMB

first_imgLATEST STORIES Game 1 of the PBA Finals tips off on Wednesday, 7 p.m. All games will be played at Araneta Coliseum.Yap paced the Painters with 14 points while Gabe Norwood added 11 points, seven rebounds and four assists.Both teams shot just 26 percent from the field. The two teams combined to set the all-time mark for the lowest scoring overtime game in the history of the PBA playoffs.ADVERTISEMENT Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:30’Excited’ Terrence Romeo out to cherish first PBA finals appearance01:00Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss MOST READ DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—Magnolia came back from 17 points down to shock Rain or Shine, 63-60, in overtime in Game 7 and book a return trip to the PBA Philippine Cup Finals Sunday night at Mall of Asia Arena.Rafi Reavis came up big with eight points, 20 rebounds and three blocks while Ian Sangalang added 11 points and 15 rebounds to power the Hotshots, who also overcame a 0-2 hole in the semifinals series.ADVERTISEMENT Philippine Arena Interchange inauguratedcenter_img Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess “We just found ways to win. We were down by 17 and I don’t know how we were able to come back,” Magnolia head coach Chito Victolero said in Filipino. “My players were just resilient. They did not want to give up. Magnolia arranged a finals date with defending champion San Miguel in a rematch of last year’s All-Filipino title showdown won by the Beermen in five games.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsWith the Elasto Painters down, 60-62, in OT, James Yap had the chance to tie but he missed a tough driving layup against two Magnolia defenders.Reavis gave the Hotshots a 61-58 edge with 1:16 remaining and split his charities to put his team up, 62-60, with 8.1 ticks to go. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid UST’s Babylove Barbon, Gen Eslapor rule BVR Dumaguete View commentslast_img read more

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