CVPS honored for storm response

first_imgThe Edison Electric Institute today honored Central Vermont Public Service with the association’s “Emergency Recovery Award” for outstanding power restoration efforts in the wake of a massive two-part weather event in February 2010. This is the third time CVPS has earned this honor.The award is presented annually to U.S. and foreign companies that face untoward circumstances caused by extraordinary events and put forth outstanding efforts to restore service to the public. Winners were chosen by a panel of judges following an international nomination process, and the awards were presented during EEI’s Spring CEO meetings.The “1-2 Punch Storm,” as it became known, was an unprecedented two-part snow and wind storm that knocked out service to hundreds of thousands of customers in the Northeast. Beginning on Feb. 23, 2010, the four-day weather event produced up to 4 feet of snow and winds approaching hurricane strength. CVPS, with a total of 159,000 customers, faced a record 104,872 outages over the course of the extended-duration event and mounted an extraordinary response. Nearly 67,000 individual customers were affected, some of whom lost service more than once.Either part of the storm event, in itself, would have ranked as one of the company’s 10 worst storms in history. Together, they affected 42 percent of CVPS customers, with as many as 27,000 customers without power at any one time. The duration of the weather event meant that even as crews worked to restore service in some areas, new outages occurred in others.”In many ways, the storm was a worst-case scenario envisioned in our storm preparedness training, yet we returned service quickly and safely,” said Joe Kraus, senior vice president for customer service, engineering and operations. “While we and our customers would love a break from the major storms that have repeatedly hammered our service territory in recent years, the award is testament to the commitment and hard work of our employees. They are among the industry’s elite.””When a storm hits, CVPS’s employees are second to none,” said Jeffrey Wimette, business manager for International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 300. “CVPS, its employees and the union share a deep concern for customers and have developed a true partnership on their behalf.”CVPS relied on private advance weather forecasts to alert the public to the pending storms and to strategically stage recovery crews, with assistance from utilities in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine and Ontario, Canada. All told, more than 600 tree cutters, line workers, schedulers and support staff were organized to repair the damage, logging 45,000 man-hours on the job.In addition, the company worked closely with news media to inform customers of its progress, repair estimates and safety issues. While there were no significant injuries, the storm provided a critical reminder of the importance of customer safety. CVPS created a new statewide advertising campaign following the event to ensure that clear, easy-to-understand safety information is available to all Vermonters.”Handling one storm well would have been a major feat – managing both safely and efficiently marks one of the greatest achievements in the company’s 81-year history and reflects the highest possible standard of customer service,” EEI President Tom Kuhn said. “It is a true pleasure to honor Central Vermont with this award.”CVPS also won the award following the 2007 “Nor’icane” that devastated Rutland County, and a second time after the 2008 ice storm that leveled much of the electric system in southern Vermont and elsewhere in New England.”These storms present us with incredible logistical challenges, but our employees have made huge sacrifices to overcome them,” CVPS Executive Chairman Bob Young said. “After 24 years at CVPS, I have never been more proud of our employees. It’s impossible to understand the depth of their commitment without spending time with them on the job, but it is nearly immeasurable.”Larry Reilly, who began work as CVPS’s ninth president on Tuesday, said the company’s reputation for service quality, customer care and reliability was one of the factors that drew him to the job. “Despite a very rural, rugged service territory, CVPS employees have a hard-earned reputation for excellence within the industry,” Reilly said. “That reputation is disproportionate to our relatively small size, and is a tribute to our 517 employees.” CVPS 3.2.2011last_img read more

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Freak storm blows through Wellington with high wind and .8 inches of rain

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comment (1) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. -3 Vote up Vote down Guest · 214 weeks ago “Reports that a fireworks stand has lost all of its fireworks.” Tracy. THIS Is an incomplete sentence and quite irresponsible. Please extrapolate, as this is pertinent information. Report Reply 0 replies · active 214 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Now that was quick. Wellington got drenched with a strom that nobody hardly saw coming. Wellington Public Works Director Jeremy Jones issued the latest statement:Due to the strong winds this afternoon, the Wellington Compost Site will remain open this evening until 8 p.m.  The City will determine hours for tomorrow later tonight.  City crews are out cleaning up storm damage.  Please contact the Street Department at 326-7831 to report any trees blocking streets.  For trees in overhead power lines please contact Electric Production at 326-2561. There was .8 inches of rain that fell on Wellington between 4 and 4:30 p.m. in a storm that barely registered on the weather radar on various weather Internet sites. In fact, The Weather Channel was saying it was partly cloudy at the time pure chaos was occurring. The storm developed in the south and came though with tremendous wind. It then left town about as quickly as it started. Wellington is now a colossal mess of tree limbs and other debris.There have been several reports of damage. Free Will Baptist, which is constructing a new church in the old Theurer’s auction building, received some damage. There were reports that a fireworks stand has lost all of its fireworks.A pear tree at 721 E. Lincoln at the Jim Miller residence landed on a USD 353 car. Another tree limb fell at Sellers Park damaging the outside fence.Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

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GARDAI FIND FRAGMENTS OF CAR IN SEARCH FOR HIT-AND-RUN DRIVER

first_imgUPDATED: Gardai have discovered debris from a car which they believe was involved in a hit-and-run incident which left a man dead outside Bundoran.The man, who is in his 40s, was found at the side of a road around 5am this morning.The man had been struck by a vehicle which failed to stop at the scene. Fragments from a car were found at the scene and are now being analysed by Gardai who have launched an investigation into the death.Head of the Donegal Traffic Corps, Inspector Michael Harrison, appealed to the driver to come forward.“We appreciate people involved in an accident might panic and drive off.“But we would appeal to them to come forward and talk to us. “We need to find out exactly what happened,” he said.The victim, who is understood to be from Liverpool but was living in Leitrim.The man had been socialising in Bundoran but decided to walk home the 5kms to his home.He is believed to have been 2kms from his home when he was struck at Ardfaran, Bundoran.Gardai say only people with local knowledge would normally use the road and have appealed for witnesses to come forward. It is understood the man phoned his wife as he walked home and she came to collect him moments after he was struck by a car.The road at the centre of the incident has been reopened and a post mortem is taking place on the man’s body at Sligo General Hospital.GARDAI FIND FRAGMENTS OF CAR IN SEARCH FOR HIT-AND-RUN DRIVER was last modified: August 26th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:bundorancardebrisinvestigationleitrimlast_img read more

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