Two Broward Officers Facing Probes for Making Racist Social Media Posts

first_imgMeanwhile, a similar situation is taking place in Miramar, after an officer there posted an expletive-filled message after the recent police-involved killing of Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta.Miramar Sgt. Scott Nix said on social media, “If you, said criminal fights me and takes my taser and then try to use my taser on me … I will blow your (expletive) brains out. I will not apologize. (expletive) you and your family and all these (expletive) politicians and media.”Miramar Police said in a statement, “Our department does not condone behavior that is inconsistent, incompatible, or in conflict with the values established by this agency. We expect all of our employees to operate with the highest level of ethics and integrity.”In addition, a statement from BSO said, “The Broward Sheriff’s Office in no way condones opinions or statements that discredit an individual or reflect poorly on our agency. As a public service agency we must always hold ourselves to the highest standard of professionalism and accountability.”The statement continues, “The sergeant has been temporarily reassigned to administrative duty during an investigation into potential social media/social network policy violations.”Karlin has turned in his BSO identification and his weapon to the department. Nix has been relieved of duty, pending the outcome of an administrative investigation. Two South Florida law enforcement officers are facing investigations by their respective departments, after they allegedly made racist comments on their social media accounts.Comments posted on the page of Sgt. David Karlin, a Broward Sheriff’s Office deputy who has been with the agency for 24 years, have placed him on restricted duty.His social media posts claim, “What is privilege? Privilege is wearing $200 sneakers when you’ve never had a job … Privilege is wearing $300 Beats headphones while living on public assistance … Privilege is the ability to go march against and protest against anything that triggers you without worrying about calling out of work.”Another on of his posts says, “I’m sorry but if you are still struggling with slavery I’m still struggling with when the vikings invaded England in the eighth century and enslaved my relatives.”According to the Broward Sheriff’s Office, Karlin is a jail supervisor.A third post by Darlin  includes a picture of a seagull on the beach, resting on a pair of basketball shoes. The text of the post reads, “Apparently this seagull got his stimulus check.”last_img read more

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Busa ‘will back Manuel’ for IMF job

first_img26 May 2011Business Unity SA (Busa) will support Planning Minister Trevor Manuel if he decides to stand for the position of International Monetary Fund (IMF) head, it said on Wednesday.“He has established excellent credentials as a former South African minister of finance, as well as enjoying a high reputation in global financial circles,” Busa spokesperson Masego Lehihi said in a statement.“He is also known as a strong advocate of reform in the global financial architecture.”BRICS should ‘influence’ decisionLehihi said Busa also endorsed the view expressed by the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) group that the next managing director of the IMF should come from an emerging economy.The increasing role of the developing countries in the world economy had to be acknowledged.“BUSA believes that, collectively, BRICS should enlarge its sphere of influence over the final decision,” he said.Manuel’s name has come up a number of times as a possible successor to France’s Dominique Strauss-Kahn, who stepped down as IMF head after he was charged with the attempted rape of a hotel maid in New York.Strauss-Kahn has denied the charges.Sapalast_img read more

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Florida Rolls Back Efficiency Goals

first_imgUtilities argue electricity consumption has plunged on its ownFrom Duke’s point of view, power use had already declined dramatically.Since the last state-required energy goals were established in 2009, Duke said, Florida “has experienced the most severe economic recessing since the Great Depression,” resulting in an overall decrease in electricity use by Duke customers of nearly 14 percent. That’s one of the steepest declines in the country, Duke added, where the average drop in energy use has been 0.1 percent.Florida regulators recognized last year that consumers were already reducing the amount of power they used, the utility said, but it wasn’t necessarily due to conservation programs.Duke added that Florida’s energy-efficiency efforts are well established, and that Duke’s own efficiency programs have saved customers more than $1.25 billion on energy bills and offset the need to built 17 power plants since 1981.“While other states have only recently begun energy-efficiency efforts, Duke Energy has been actively promoting energy-efficiency efforts in Florida since the oil embargo in the last 1970s,” Ivey said. “As a result, many of the efficiency savings other states may be seeing now, we in Florida reaped those benefits and savings decades ago.” Lower goals for energy savingsUnder state law, commissioners set 10-year conservation goals for each utility, and utilities respond with specific programs they will use to meet the goals, Sterling Ivey, a spokesman for Duke Energy Florida, wrote in an email. Commissioners can ask a utility to add, drop, or modify a particular program.Conservation programs might target such things as duct sealing, attic insulation upgrades, heat pump replacement, reflective roofing, and upgrades to wall insulation and windows.In its decision last week, the commission was voting on new goals for reductions in electrical consumption for affected utilities — reduction efforts which regulators call “demand-side management.” In Duke’s case, Sterling said, the new 10-year conservation goal is 195 gigawatt-hours, exactly what Duke had proposed.Five years ago, the conservation goal for Duke was 3,205 gWh.Two other utilities affected by the ruling got just what they had requested, far below the goals recommended by two intervenors. Only Flower Power & Light was overruled by the commission, which set a conservation goal of 526 gWh instead of the utility’s proposed goal of 59 gWh. Florida’s Public Service Commission has voted to trim energy efficiency goals sharply and to end solar equipment rebates by the end of next year.According to an article in the Tampa Bay Times, the panel voted 3 to 2 late last month in support of the proposals from the state’s big utilities, which also had the support of the commission’s staff.Utilities had urged deep cuts in energy efficiency programs and an end to solar equipment rebates on the grounds that neither program was cost-effective. The newspaper said that the utility owners argued that it is now cheaper for them to produce electricity than it is to pay for programs designed to conserve it. (This is exactly the opposite conclusion of a recent report from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which found the cost of energy conservation programs is about half of what it cost to generate power at a conventional coal-burning power plant.)The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) categorized the rollbacks as “stunning” when compared with the energy goals that the commission established only six years ago.The commissioners agreed to schedule workshops on improving solar energy, but the Tampa newspaper said that might not be enough to prevent a legal challenge to the most recent vote. SACE executive director Stephen Smith was quoted as saying that the commission’s vote might amount to a violation of state law. Solar incentives are “not cost-effective”Florida utilities offered a variety of incentives for photovoltaic (PV) and solar hot-water systems, including a $2 per watt rebate for residential PV systems, with a $20,000 maximum payout. Investor-owned utilities wanted the rebates to end; others, including the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, didn’t.Between 2011 and 2013, investor-owned utilities wrote rebate checks totaling $49.7 million for about 5,600 residential and commercial PV and solar hot-water projects.But the programs treated non-solar customers unfairly, the utilities argued.“The [investor-owned utilities] all agree that the solar pilot programs were not cost-effective and the general body of ratepayers — in particular, non-participants — have been subsidizing the incentives provided to participants installing solar PV,” the commission’s staff analysis reads.In recommending that solar pilot programs be allowed to expire at the end of 2015, the staff agreed with one utility witness who said, “It is simply not a responsible use of taxpayer dollars to promote these programs under any cost-effective test.”“The programs are not cost-effective and experience gained since the last goals proceeding indicates that consumers have continued to install systems without any rebates,” the staff concluded. “The current solar rebates represent a large subsidy from the general body of ratepayers to a very small segment of each utility’s customers.” New power plants are approvedWhile energy efficiency and solar rebates get the boot, the Tampa Bay Times said, “utilities will go into the holidays with their biggest wishes this year, including billions of dollars in new power plants that will come online in the next decade.”That includes a $1.5 billion natural gas plant that Duke Energy wants to build to take the place of the Crystal River nuclear power station and two coal-burning units.The newspaper pointed out that Florida is fighting a trend that is helping other states save energy. In Vermont, for example, energy efficiency efforts — such as subsidies for high-efficiency light bulbs — have helped the state meet more than 2 percent of its annual energy needs through conservation. “In Florida,” the newspaper said, “the number is 0.25 percent — and now dropping.”SACE also had sharp words for the commission. A statement issued after the vote said in part, “Florida’s power companies use a host of methods, rejected long ago by the majority of U.S. utilities and commissions, to support their anemic proposed goals, including arbitrarily eliminating all efficiency measures that have the highest energy savings to customers…“The line between the [Public Service Commission] and the monopoly utilities they are charged with regulating has become increasingly blurred. The massive amount of money poured into political contributions and lobbying by the state’s monopoly utilities is clearly paying off at the PSC — to the detriment of customers. It’s time we removed the word ‘Public’ from the agency’s name.”last_img read more

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Fix A Blown-Out Sky In Under 60 Seconds In After Effects

first_imgBefore we start, you need a photograph of the sky that is the same size (or larger) than your composition.Create a New CompositionImport your video file and the sky photo. Bring both files into your timeline, and place the sky beneath the video file.Luma Key EffectAdd the Luma Key effect to the video file, and change the key type to Key Out Brighter. Then increase the threshold until your image returns with the sky image below now filling the sky in the video file. This is something that will be different with every clip. For my shot, 200 is perfect.Unfortunately, we are now left with a thin white line around some edges in our image.Refine Soft MatteTo fix this, add a Refine Soft Matte to the video file. This may be enough for some people. However, in shots like mine that include foliage, you will need to play around with the settings to refine the effect. The settings you will need to adjust depending on your footage are contrast, shift edge, and decontamination amount. If necessary, you can also change the Edge Feather setting on the Luma Key effect in the video file.Final AdjustmentsFinally, before the video clip is ready for export or grading, adjust the brightness, saturation, or lightness of the sky to match the video file. Do you have other tips for correcting a blown-out sky? Share in the comments. This is a great way to quickly replace a blown-out sky, and removing any highlight issues with foliage or small objects that bleed into the blown-out highlights.Bonus Tips:If you have a moving shot, simply track the movement and apply it to the cloud layer.If you have sourced your sky image from a stock image website, you may want to add a Gaussian Blur (5-10) to the sky to take the crispness away from the picture.When filming, if you know that this shot will ultimately be a “fix it in post” job, make sure you grab a variety of well-exposed sky photographs to use later.center_img Capturing your foreground under bright conditions can easily blow out the sky in your shot. Learn how to fix the problem with this step-by-step tutorial.Top image via Shutterstock.Sky replacement tutorials are a dime a dozen on YouTube, and each educator will often have their own method, using a variety of different effects and techniques. The following method won’t explain how to replace a perfectly captured sky with something a little different. It will, however, show you how to replace a blown-out sky with something more pleasing to the eye.It’s very easy and very fast. It took me only 54.3 seconds, to be exact, to implement the effect ready for grading and export.The technique requires a sky that has entirely clipped with no visible blue or clouds. This is usually the result of shooting into the direction of the sun and exposing for the foreground. Of course, this is one shooting practice that you want to avoid. You can correct this by filming with the sun to your back, using a graduated neutral density filter, or using a surplus of lighting to expose for the sky and light the foreground. Alternatively, if you’re unable to film in the opposite direction, you can wait for a later time in the day.Nonetheless, there may be a reason why these alternative approaches are not possible and you have to shoot facing the sun and work with a blown-out sky. Fear not. Here is how you can fix your footage under sixty seconds.last_img read more

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CPCB threatens to shut unit of Panipat Thermal Power Station if emission norms deadline not met

first_imgThe Central Pollution Control Board has issued a show-cause notice to the Panipat Thermal Power Station (PTPS) in Haryana, warning that one of its units could be shut down for failing to comply with the deadline to meet emission norms.“PTPS, HPGCL (Haryana Power Generation Corporation), Haryana, is hereby directed to show cause as to why unit 7 of the plant should not be closed in view of non-compliance,” CPCB chairman S.P. Parihar said in the notice dated November 13. The Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change had in 2015 come up with new norms for coal-based power plants to cut down emissions of particulate matter (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and oxides of nitrogen. The earlier deadline for power stations to adhere to these guidelines was December 2017. However, 440 power plants that were to be retrofitted with modern flue-gas desulfurisation (FGD) units, which cut emissions of sulfur dioxide, did not comply with the norms. The Central Electricity Authority then chalked out a detailed plan to retrofit old thermal plants across the country with required equipment to comply with the new norms by a 2022 deadline. For thermal power plants in the National Capital Region (NCR), the deadline was 2019. According to a Centre for Science and Environment report released in February this year, most power plants in Delhi-NCR will fail to meet the December 2019 deadline. The Supreme Court-mandated Environment Pollution (Prevention and Control) Authority had earlier said Haryana’s two coal-based power plants in NCR will be shut down if they fail to comply with emission norms by next year. The other thermal power plant in Haryana is in Jhajjar.last_img read more

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India fined for slow over-rate in Cape Town Test

first_imgThe India have been fined for maintaining a slow over-rate during the second innings against South Africa in the ongoing third and last Test in Cape Town, an ICC release said on Thursday.ICC Match Referee Andy Pycroft imposed the fine after Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s side was ruled to be three overs short of its target when time allowances were taken into consideration. In accordance with the ICC code of conduct regulations governing minor over-rate offences, players are fined 10 per cent of their match fees for every over their side fails to bowl in the allotted time, with the captain fined double that amount. As such, Dhoni was fined 60 per cent of his match fee while his players received 30-per-cent fines.If Dhoni is found guilty of two further minor over-rate offences in Tests over the next 12 months, he will receive a one-match suspension as per the provisions of the ICC code of conduct.last_img read more

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Randy Moss Says His Time With 49ers Is Over

Wide receiver Randy Moss said his time with the San Francisco 49ers has come to an end.“Wished we could’ve finished the job!! Thanks for the opportunity an good luck in the future 9ers,” Moss tweeted Saturday evening.There was no specific reason of given for why the 49ers did not wish to retain the services of the future Hall of Famer, but comments made by Moss before the Super Bowl may have added to the organizations decision to go their separate ways.Moss said then that he was dissatisfied with his role on the team.“I don’t like my role. I don’t,” Moss said. “I like to be out there playing football.”San Francisco general manager Trent Baalke gave a slight hint during the NFL Combine that the team had already reached a conclusion about Moss not returning to the team for the 2013 season.“We’re certainly happy that he was in [in San Francisco],” Baalke responded when he was asked about Moss’ future with the team. “Is he going to return this? I don’t know that yet.”Apparently, the 36-year-old Moss, who signed a one-year deal with the 49ers last March after returning from a one-year retirement, received word that he will not be back.Moss played in all 16 games and 28 receptions for 434 yards and three touchdowns in the regular season, making two starts. In the 49ers Super Bowl loss to the Ravens, he caught two passes for 41 yards.Despite Moss and the San Francisco parting ways, he told some of his 49ers teammates that he still can play at a high level, according to CBSSports.com.Moss had become a fixture in the 49ers locker room, even for starting quarterback Colin Kaepernick.“He was great to me,” Kaapernick said in an interview with the NFL Network on Feb. 28. “He made sure I knew what the defense was doing. He was someone that helped me a great deal and I hope he’s back with us.”Now that it is clear that Moss will not return, he will hit the free agent market on March 12, with the hopes of finding a suitor.Moss will be looking to add to his 982 catches for 15,292 yards and 156 touchdowns, but hopefully with a Super Bowl contender. read more

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Commentary Ohio State mens basketballs affinity for defense keeping Final Four dreams

Hey, you! Yes, you, right there, Joe/Jane Buckeye fan. You go here because of the football team, right? I know, I know, we all do. It’s OK. School is secondary. And, let me guess, since you go to Ohio State because of Buckeye football, you probably have a special affinity for defense. Brutal, violent, aggressive, stingy defense. Beautiful defense. And, let me surmise, you look at the basketball team, with its inconsistent offense and those four losses and think: “Hey, it’s only, like, eight months until Urban Meyer unleashes his freshly non-bowl banned OSU football team on the rest of the country.” Stop it right now. It’s not August yet. It’s basketball season. It’s Big Ten basketball season. And your Buckeyes are playing a brand of basketball I know you can appreciate. They’re playing basketball with a football mentality. They’re playing brutal, violent, aggressive, stingy defense. Beautiful defense. Football defense. Jared Sullinger is gone. William Buford is gone. The Buckeyes’ elite offensive abilities are gone too, and it’s showing. Against elite teams, OSU’s offense has sputtered for long stretches. The Buckeyes have made 3-point shooting look as difficult as solving a Rubik’s cube in less than 30 seconds (if only junior guard Aaron Craft could do the former as well as the latter) and they lack a go-to second scorer (Craft? Sophomore forward LaQuinton Ross? Junior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr.? Brutus Buckeye?) behind the offensive genius that is junior forward Deshaun Thomas. Where would OSU be without Thomas? Hint: somewhere losing a lot of games by 20.5 points. But guess what? It doesn’t matter that OSU is trying to set offensive basketball back to the peach basket days of Dr. James Naismith, the game’s creator. The team’s defense is good. Like, Final Four good. Don’t give up on them. Craft is and has been the NCAA’s preeminent perimeter defender since he stepped on campus in 2010. He smothers guards. His scalp list the last three years reads like a “Who’s Who” of college basketball: Trey Burke, Jordan Taylor, Dion Waiters, Scoop Jardine, Tyshawn Taylor, Brandon Knight, Seth Curry, Erving Walker and the list goes on. Point blank, he’s OSU redshirt sophomore cornerback Bradley Roby in sneakers. His competitors know by pregame they’re going to wear a Craft coat for the next 40 minutes. Craft’s partner-in-crime, sophomore guard Shannon Scott, averages a hair under two steals per game and plays passing lanes like a seasoned veteran. Smith Jr., is a hulking 6-foot-4 menace who can physically overpower smaller foes. Sophomore forward Sam Thompson is a weak-side shot-blocking terror with staggering athleticism and a 476-foot vertical leap (approximately). If someone manages to penetrate the lane against OSU’s guards, 6-foot-11 sophomore center Amir Williams lurks in the paint ready to send any shot all the way back to his hometown in Detroit. Any way you slice it, the Buckeyes’ top-20 scoring defense (out of 345 teams) gives them a chance to win any game, despite the offense’s struggles. Hmmm, actually that sounds familiar. Wait, are we sure Jim Tressel isn’t coaching basketball? Don’t write off this season just yet. Sure, the offense might not be Sweet 16 worthy (or outside of Thomas, even RPAC worthy) but the defense is Final Four caliber. It might not be pretty, but the basketball Buckeyes are taking a page out of Woody Hayes’ playbook and embracing a new, defense-first identity. As football fans, it shouldn’t be hard for us to do the same. read more

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Football Looking ahead to Ohio States seasondefining matchup against Penn State

OSU then-freshman defensive end Nick Bosa (97) and other dejected Buckeyes return to the locker room after their 24-21 loss against Penn State on Oct. 22. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Former Photo EditorBoth No. 6 Ohio State (6-1, 4-0 Big Ten) and No. 2 Penn State (7-0, 4-0 Big Ten) will head to Ohio Stadium at 3:30 p.m. Saturday for their biggest respective challenges to date. With major playoff implications on the line, this matchup will be what defines the remainder of the season for both teams. Here is a preview of the upcoming game. Ohio State offense vs. Penn State defenseWhen most people think about Penn State, they immediately direct their attention to the offense led by Heisman hopeful running back Saquon Barkley and quarterback Trace McSorley. However, a major component of Penn State’s recent success has come in the form of its defense. To this point, the defensive efforts have largely been the product of one of the best secondaries in the nation. Led by two Thorpe Award semifinalists, safety Marcus Allen and cornerback Grant Haley, the Nittany Lions’ secondary is tied for the Big Ten lead with nine interceptions on the year while placing second in the conference with only 167.6 passing yards allowed per game. The defense has allowed only three passing touchdowns all season, none in the past two games. The Buckeyes might not find it much easier to run the ball against Penn State either as the Nittany Lions have allowed opponents an average of just 115.3 yards per game, 17th-fewest in the nation. With a stout defensive front led by defensive ends Shareef Miller and Shaka Toney, Penn State is fourth in the nation with an average of 8.4 tackles for loss and 3.4 sacks per game. Miller has contributed seven tackles for loss and three sacks while Toney has six tackles for loss and 3 1/2 sacks. Perhaps no one on the defensive side of the football stands out more than linebacker Jason Cabinda. The 6-foot-1, 234-pound senior paces the team in total tackles (53), has forced and recovered a fumble and has recorded four sacks and two tackles for loss.Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer spoke about how much of a challenge the defensive front presents Ohio State and did not originally single out any one player in particular, but he made sure to praise the standout linebacker of the Nittany Lions.“The one guy that steps up big time is [Cabinda],” Meyer said on the Big Ten coaches teleconference Tuesday. “You see him all over the place. But to say one D-lineman is better than the other, I can’t do that. I just think they’re well coached and go extremely hard.”This will be the most potent offense Penn State faces this season, but at the same time, this will be the most talented defense the Buckeyes have faced to this point. Ohio State is ranked No. 12 in passing offense (326.7 yards per game) and No. 18 in rushing offense (250.6 yards per game), and has seemed to be hitting its stride as of late, outscoring opponents 266-56 over its last five games. The Buckeyes’ passing attack is unlike those that Nittany Lions have faced this season. It is an offense that derives most of its success from shorter passes and relying on blocking rather than beating the defenders downfield. Still, neither the Penn State defense nor the Ohio State offense have been sufficiently tested this season, with the exception of Week 2 when the Buckeyes mustered only 16 points against Oklahoma. Ohio State defense vs. Penn State offensePenn State’s offense features so many potent weapons, it’s often tough to keep track of them all. Head coach James Franklin’s team has the nation’s best running back in Barkley, a mammoth tight end in Mike Gesicki, who creates all sorts of matchup issues, and a dual-threat quarterback in McSorley, who can make plays with his arm and his legs.Barkley has been a weapon for Penn State in all areas of the game. The junior running back has a passing touchdown, eight rushing touchdowns, three receiving touchdowns and returned a kickoff for a touchdown. He leads the nation in all-purpose yards with 1,478, as he is Penn State’s leading rusher, receiver and primary kickoff returner. Junior linebacker Jerome Baker, who could be asked to defend Barkley one-on-one in the passing game, said Barkley is a fun player to watch, and he is excited for the challenge of possibly stopping stop the Heisman favorite Saturday.“The dude’s a monster. He’s a good back. I just like watching him, honestly,” Baker said Tuesday. “Very excited to go against him because he can do it all. Pass block, run routes, he can definitely run the ball, jump over you, run through you. I’m excited.”Despite the big-name playmakers on the roster, Penn State’s offensive statistics don’t jump out on the page. The Nittany Lions average only 173.4 rushing yards per game (54th in the nation) and 289.9 passing yards per game (25th), both falling short of the numbers Ohio State has this season despite Penn State being heralded as one of the best offenses in the nation and Ohio State as one that has struggled. Overall, Ohio State is tied for the most points scored per game (47.3) while Penn State is only at 16th with 40. While some of that will likely be chalked up to strength of schedule, Ohio State has been ranked as the 15th-toughest schedule to date while Penn State is only at 18th, according to Team Rankings.The struggles for the offense have most likely come from the one surprising weak spot for the Nittany Lions: the offensive line. Entering the year with lofty expectations as a strong, veteran core of players, the group has not done an effective job protecting McSorley. The unit has allowed the 35th-most sacks per game in the nation (2.57) and has surrendered the sixth-most tackles for loss (8.14).This offensive line will be forced to step up in a big way against a defensive line that has turned offensive linemen into revolving doors all season long. Ohio State averages the 32nd-most sacks per game (2.57) and fifth-most tackles for loss (8.3). What should be an area of concern for Penn State is the fact the Buckeyes’ defensive line is fresh, coming off a bye week following five weeks where each starter was out before the fourth quarter. Not to mention enough depth to allow for essentially four starters at every position.Redshirt senior defensive end Tyquan Lewis said at this point in the season, he feels well-rested and ready for what will be his team’s most important game this season.“I think the most plays I’ve played all year, so far, well since Oklahoma, it’s probably like 30, 33, something like that,” Lewis said Tuesday. “It’s been kind of low since then. But it’s just you feel fresh, it’s a lot of reps off your body. Now it’s the meat of the season with a stretch, so now you know you have to play at least 50 plays.”Penn State’s offense will put up plenty of points, but the play up front could be what separates the Nittany Lions from a win and a loss. The team has plenty of playmakers who can burn the Buckeyes with the ball in their hands, but that will only happen if the line can protect McSorley and provide space for Barkley to break into the secondary. Ohio State’s secondary can be exploited and has been throughout the year when matched up against an above-average passing offense. But if McSorley is pressured in the pocket, it could be more challenging for him to get off the passes needed to beat Ohio State. In this case, the best passing defense might not come from Ohio State’s secondary, but rather on the defensive line. Predictions:Edward Sutelan: Penn State wins 27-24Colin Hass-Hill: Ohio State wins 45-31 read more

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Football JT Barretts path to the biggest win in his career

Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) signals a first down in the fourth quarter of the B1G Championship game against Wisconsin on Dec. 2 in Lucas Oil Stadium. Ohio State won 27-21. Credit: James King II | Sports DirectorINDIANAPOLIS — Staring at a packed defensive line and an empty backfield, Ohio State’s drive hinged on J.T. Barrett. The situation: fourth-and-1 with seven minutes left on Wisconsin’s 13-yard line with Ohio State clinging to a narrow 24-21 lead.Barrett took the snap and rushed right into a defender behind the line of scrimmage. Wisconsin fans in the stands and players began to celebrate, but the play was not over. Barrett pushed on. Leaning on a knee that had surgery just six days ago, he spun free of the defender, bounced to the outside and willed himself to the first-down marker. “That was a very tough call. Offensive line wanted to go for it,” head coach Urban Meyer said. “But we’re up by three. If we do not, that gives them life. I’ve just been on the other side of that ball, all you need is a field goal to tie the game as opposed to you need a touchdown.”Barrett was not fully healthy. The knee that helped him spin out of the defender’s grasp had forced him to leave the team’s last game against Michigan with a knee injury and required surgery the following day. Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) crashes in a touchdown in the second quarter of the B1G Championship game against Wisconsin on Dec. 2 in Lucas Oil Stadium. Ohio State won 27-21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorSix days later, Barrett proved one healthy leg was all he needed to propel the No. 8 Buckeyes to the 27-21 victory in the Big Ten championship game against No. 4 Wisconsin. He finished 12-for-26 for 211 passing yards, two touchdowns and two interceptions, while rushing 19 times for 60 yards for one touchdown.After the team’s win against Michigan last week, Barrett said he would be ready to start despite uncertainty expressed by Meyer. He made sure he stayed true to that statement.“I said I was going to play next week,” Barrett said Saturday. “So if I didn’t, I was kind of going to be a liar. And I wouldn’t lie.”Having the arthroscopic surgery the following day was not an option, the quarterback said. It was a requirement.“I really couldn’t straighten my leg out being my meniscus popped out,” Barrett said. “But I mean, it was just a small procedure, really. And then just a lot of treatment. A lot of time in the training room. Tried to do my best to get my mental reps through film and then out there on the field as well so I’d be able to play today.”Barrett spent a minimum of 15 hours with the training staff, Meyer estimated. Meyer said after the surgery, his return was a step-by-step process and that by Thursday, the team knew he would be ready to go. That itself was remarkable considering all he had been through. Meyer said only one other player had come back within a week from that similar surgery and played.But he said there was never any doubt in his mind Barrett would start.“How you keep him out of a game, I just don’t know how it happens,” Meyer said. Redshirt senior center Billy Price said during the week in an effort to alleviate some of the potential pressures put on Barrett’s injury, Barrett spent time watching tape rather than fully participating in the physical warmups of practice. Barrett added that it wasn’t until Friday, the morning the team left for Indianapolis, that he even had any practice running.Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) dives for a first down in the fourth quarter of the B1G Championship game against Wisconsin on Dec. 2 in Lucas Oil Stadium. Ohio State won 27-21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo Editor“I took about half the Thursday reps in practice. And I was mainly throwing the football. Didn’t run at all,” Barrett said. “And then yesterday before we took the bus ride here, I did a whole bunch of cutting and planting on my knee. And I had confidence in my ability to go out there. So it wasn’t like I was second-guessing at all.”When game time rolled around, the uncertainty over Barrett’s ability to start was not in question. But the players and coaches collectively held their breath whenever he would take a big hit.“Whenever he hits the ground, I want to be the first one over there to be, ‘Hey, are you OK? Everything good? Let’s get to the next play,’” Price said. “And I don’t like people hitting him anyway, so it’s an aspect of checking on your man. I mean that’s my dude.”Meyer knew he had backup quarterback Dwayne Haskins, who filled in admirably for Barrett last week against Michigan, at the ready should the need arise.It did not. Though Haskins was seen frequently warming up on the sideline, Barrett maintained his grip on the starting role from the opening snap until when he planted that injured knee on the ground in the victory formation in the game’s final seconds. It appeared early on that his injury was hampering his performance. The dual-threat quarterback appeared to wait in the pocket for receivers to be open down field far more often than normal and his speed appeared just a notch below normal.On his team’s first drive of the game, he escaped the pocket to the left for two yards before being tackled. However, there was plenty of open space and a healthy Barrett likely would have made it closer to, if not all the way, to the first-down marker.But he seemed to turn all questions around fast. In the quest for his first-ever Big Ten title at the helm, Barrett turned things around on his next drive. Junior wide receiver Terry McLaurin caught an 84-yard touchdown pass deep down the field and outran defenders for a touchdown. The next drive, Barrett found H-back Parris Campbell, who hauled in a short pass and took it to the house for the 57-yard score.Ohio State junior wide receiver Terry McLaurin (83) runs the ball in for a touchdown in the first quarter of the B1G Championship game against Wisconsin on Dec. 2 in Lucas Oil Stadium. Ohio State won 27-21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo Editor“The open pass to start the game to Terry McLaurin was a great pass,” Meyer said. “We caught them in zero hold coverage and it was a big hit. And Parris came out the end of the other bubble. Whenever you play zero hold coverage, if you break your tackle you come out the other end.”Barrett had two other chances to hit wide-open receivers for additional scores in the second quarter when H-back K.J. Hill and wide receiver Johnnie Dixon both found themselves with space behind the Badgers’ defense. Twice, Barrett overshot his intended targets.“We left a lot of yardage on the field,” Meyer said. “We had some misfires in the throw game that were — guys were wide open. But I thought we adjusted fairly good against one of the top defenses in the country. Still had 450 yards of offense, but there was a lot of offense on the field.”Despite the mistakes Barrett made Saturday, he did enough for Ohio State to win the game. He was not the MVP of the game. But Ohio State had several moments when its offensive leader did exactly what was needed.Barrett wanted to start Saturday, but was dealing with an injury. So he willed himself to start. Barrett wanted the first down on that crucial play in the fourth quarter. So he willed himself to the first-down. Barrett wanted the Big Ten championship game. So he willed himself to win. read more

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