IATA data reveals slowdown in aviation recovery | News

first_imgCapacity plummeted 79 per cent, and load factor withered 38 percentage points to 43 per cent.Domestic demand in September was down 43 per cent compared to the previous year, improved from a 51 per cent decline in August. Compared to 2019, capacity fell by a third and the load factor dropped 12 percentage points to 70 per cent.- Advertisement – OlderWizz partners with CarTrawler for new rental options This is only a slightly improvement over the 75 per cent year-to-year decline recorded in August.Capacity was down 63 per cent compared to a year ago and load factor fell 22 percentage points to 60 per cent.International passenger demand in September plunged 89 per cent compared to September 2019, basically unchanged from the 88.5 per cent decline recorded in August. – Advertisement – “We have hit a wall in the industry’s recovery. “A resurgence in Covid-19 outbreaks – particularly in Europe and the US – combined with governments’ reliance on the blunt instrument of quarantine in the absence of globally aligned testing regimes, has halted momentum toward re-opening borders to travel. “Although domestic markets are doing better, this is primarily owing to improvements in China and Russia. “And domestic traffic represents just a bit more than a third of total traffic, so it is not enough to sustain a general recovery,” said Alexandre de Juniac, IATA director general.center_img Figures from the International Air Transport Association have confirmed that passenger demand in September remained highly depressed.Total demand (measured in revenue passenger kilometres or RPKs) was 73 per cent below September 2019 levels.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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In Greater Jakarta, vegetable vendors see more customers during pandemic

first_img“But that turned out not to be true. I am able to sell all of my vegetables now. It is a blessing for me.”Yunaiti is one of the small-scale vegetable sellers in the capital who never expected to see an upturn in their business when many people are staying at home after the city imposed large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) on April 10.Many residents are reluctant to go to traditional markets located far from home just to buy vegetables, fearing that they might contract the disease along the way. They prefer to go to nearby vendors.As a result, Yunaiti booked around Rp 3.5 million (US$233) in revenue per day in April, an increase compared from around Rp 2.5 million per day before the outbreak. As most businesses in Greater Jakarta are facing a major downturn during the COVID-19 crisis, small vegetable vendors and tukang sayur (mobile vegetable sellers), who typically operate in residential areas, have seen more customers buying their products.“At first I was concerned that my kiosk would see fewer customers due to the stay-at-home order,” said Yunaiti, 35, who runs a vegetable kiosk in Ragunan, South Jakarta. She suspected that the longer operating hours of her kiosk during the epidemic might have also contributed to the increasing number of customers.“I run my vegetable kiosk until around 8 p.m. while most of the traditional markets can only serve customers until 5 p.m. during the PSBB. I think that is another reason why people keep coming to my shop,” she said.Ucok Amin, a 50-year-old vegetable seller in Tanah Baru subdistrict, Bogor city, took a different approach to market his products during the PSBB in Bogor, which has been in place since April 15.He now offers a delivery service for vegetables and meats to cater to the needs of people in self-isolation. People can send him their shopping list via popular messaging app WhatsApp at least a night before the delivery.“I or my nephew will deliver them before 10 a.m. every day by motorcycle. But we only serve customers who live within a 2-kilometer radius from our kiosk to ensure efficiency and on-time delivery,” Ucok said.“This strategy has been such a success. I earn daily revenue around Rp 3 million now, much better than the Rp 2 million per day before the PSBB,” he added.Hosianna Evalita, a 30-year-old economist in Bintara, Bekasi city, said she restrained herself from going to traditional markets and instead bought vegetables from a nearby vendor to avoid possible crowds at traditional markets.That is also the case for Titik, a 53-year-old mother in Buaran, East Jakarta, who buys vegetables from tukang sayur more frequently now.“Before the epidemic, I used to go to the nearby Perumnas Klender Market every two days, but now I only go there once a week,” she said. “I don’t mind spending extra money to buy vegetables [from tukang sayur] as long as it protects me better from the disease. Not to mention it is more convenient, too.”The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) representative in Indonesia, Stephen Rudgard, has urged the public to buy food from local small businesses to support their livelihoods during the COVID-19 crisis and to appreciate smallholder farmers.“It is time for us to pay attention to one another and to appreciate the people at the frontline in this pandemic who produce our food,” Rudgard said in a statement.Topics :last_img read more

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Iowa Economic Development Authority director says Mason City “hitting it on all cylinders” (AUDIO)

first_imgMASON CITY — Iowa Economic Development Authority director Debi Durham was in Mason City today to see first-hand the progress on the River City Renaissance project. It’s part of the Iowa Reinvestment Act, a special program that allows cities to create special development districts where a portion of the sales and hotel-motel taxes can be set aside to help fund projects that spur economic development. Durham says despite some bumps in the road in getting things started, the IEDA was fully in support of the Mason City project. “Well I want you to know that we never wavered in our support of Mason City in this project, and yeah there were some missteps at the beginning, but you know that’s not untypical to be honest. When you’re trying to put together a deal as complicated with as many moving parts as you have here, I wouldn’t say that’s uncommon. We never wavered in our support of the project or support that at the end of the day Mason City would deliver great projects, which you always do, and I think today is a testament to that.” Durham says some of the issues Mason City had in getting the project moving were common with other Iowa Reinvestment Act projects.  “Absolutely, in fact I’ll use my own hometown Sioux City, I still live in Sioux City, and they had several changes to theirs as well. They just broke ground on the arena, which was kind of their pivotal point or the major element of their reinvestment district, and that that just is happening right. So you’re even further along than they are. We’ve seen that, we’ve seen some slow up on Waterloo. We’re still waiting to see what they’re going to do with the marina piece.” The initial $100 million of funding for the Iowa Reinvestment Act has been allocated, and Durham says there’s talks in the legislature of once again funding the program, but she says she has some concerns that would need to be addressed moving forward.   “You’re basing all of this on proformas. So let’s be honest, every proforma I’ve ever looked at is wrong, the question is how wrong is it right? So as your community will tell you, we put these communities under extreme scrutiny to really make that proforma as conservative as possible, because it doesn’t come back to the state, it actually comes back locally if there is a shortfall at the end of the day. We just won’t know that until the program is spent.” Durham says she likes what she’s been seeing recently in the Mason City-Clear Lake area.  “It seems like you guys are really hitting it on all cylinders here I have to tell you. I even like the things that the program the Chambers are doing, the “Breaking the Glass”, showing more diversity in leadership here. Those are the things that are so important. I’m impressed with what’s going on, and you can feel it. There’s an energy here today that I can say I haven’t felt as strong in years when the past times I’ve been here. This is a rallying cry for people, they do get to see it and say your leaders are making good decisions, this was a good thing for the community, and so yeah I think you should feel pretty good about where you’re at right now.” Durham was the keynote speaker for the “State of North Iowa” presentation from the Mason City Chamber of Commerce held at the Mason City Multi-purpose Arena. You can hear our full conversation with Durham via the audio player below. You can also hear it as well as her speech from today’s event during next Wednesday morning’s “Ask the Mayor” program on AM-1300 KGLO starting at about 9:10 AM.last_img read more

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