Sister interprets the ‘good’

first_imgSister Joan Chittister, a Benedictine sister and author of 45 books, discussed the common good during the annual Fr. Bernie Clarke Lecture on Catholic Social Tradition on Monday night in the Hesburgh Library auditorium. “Tonight I want to spend a little time sorting out … the whole concept of ‘the common good,’” she said. Chittister said celebrating the 50th anniversary of the encyclical “Pacem en Terris” brings people to the very heart of what it means not only to be a Christian or a Catholic, but also to be a citizen of the United States.”In every single presidential election cycle, we enter as a people into the centrifuge of one of the oldest debates and at the same time one of the most pressing contemporary questions in the life of this country,” she said. “That question is what exactly as a people are we about? Is such a think as the common good even possible in a world such as ours?” Chittister said in “Pacem in Terris”, Pope John XIII does not talk about peace in terms of war or weapons of mass destruction, but in terms of the common good. “In 176 paragraphs of that encyclical, he talks 48 times about the common good,” she said. “Without the common good, there will never be peace and certainly no justice.” Chittister said the issue of the common good even divided Alexis de Tocqueville and James Madison on the question of what the common good is and how to obtain it. “[The common good] riveted the Founding Fathers 200 years ago and it clearly confuses this session of Congress,” she said. “It has plagued political philosophers and economists across centuries and it continues to do so to this very day.” The common good is the holy grail of politics, Chittister said. “The common good is a vision of public virtue, which engages the individual citizen, energizes the government, shapes the public system and points the public direction and all it’s policies, all it’s institutions and all it’s legislative intents,” Chittister said. “The common good is the answer to the question, what, that we all want for this country … what is it that we really want for this country and how do we go about getting it.” Chittister said now the discourse in the U.S. is more inclined to talk about the general good instead of the common good. “We talk about the public good, meaning natural gifts that benefit us all equally, like air, water and good order if of course we have the good fortune to find air that is pure, water that is clean and land that is toxin free, resources that are sufficient to afford anywhere,” she said. There is no doubt the common good is an endangered species, Chittister said. Chittister said the world is changing through globalization with more diversity present in religion, nations and neighborhoods. What once divided people – language, geography – no longer do so, she said. “‘Pacem in Terris’ gets clearer everyday,” she said. “The fact that one is a citizen of a particular state does not detract from anyway from his of her membership in the human family as a whole or from their citizenship in the world community.” Contact Anna Boarini at [email protected]last_img read more

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Shamrock Series offers volunteer opportunities

first_imgFans will travel to Dallas this weekend to cheer for the Irish in this year’s Shamrock Series game against Arizona State, and a group of Notre Dame alumni and friends plan to make a lasting impact on a Texas charity while they are in town. Alumni Association President Erin O’Connor French and spiritual director Angie Appleby Purcell collaborated with Catholic Charities USA to bring volunteers to the Assessment Center of Tarrant County in Fort Worth, Texas, Purcell said. Participants will renovate the building and support the children served at the Center by painting walls, building picnic tables and offering monetary donations.  Purcell said the Alumni Association organizes volunteer events annually to coincide with Shamrock Series games and Notre Dame’s bowl games to show generosity to the extended community beyond campus.  “Other folks, other teams and other people may be gathering for the social aspect, which of course we are too, but for Notre Dame it is very important for us to give back to the local community, particularly to those who are needy,” Purcell said. When the Notre Dame community travels together, they hope to leave the place in a better state than when they arrived, French said.  “This is a way for us to make a long-lasting impact … and make it worth-while for them to host Notre Dame and to leave a positive impact on those communities,” French said. The beneficiary of this project, the Assessment Center of Tarrant County, serves as a home for children under the age of 17 who have been taken from their parents for child welfare concerns, French said.  “Its primary goal is to not only house these children in a safe environment, but it is a very holistic approach to their education, to their psychological well-being, to their health, to their safety, with the goal being for these children to be reunited with their families,” Purcell said. In line with this holistic approach, while the volunteers work on the building, the children will receive tours of Dallas Stadium, and many will attend the game as well, she said. “With children whose lives are really in turmoil and have faced far more obstacles and challenges in life than they should, we are hoping for an afternoon or weekend in which they can just be kids again and not have any worries other than just to have fun,” Purcell said. French said the actual physical effort of the volunteers would go towards improving the comfort and atmosphere of the children’s temporary home.  “What we’re trying to do is make it less clinical, less sterile and more home-like for these children,” she said. “It’s a tumultuous time for them, and a lot of them are quite young … so we’re going to paint and make it more home-like. We hope to do some planting work out in the outside of the building [and] we will work on the recess play areas for them depending on the number of volunteers.” Purcell said members of the Notre Dame community who cannot travel to Texas could still participate by donating $25 to sponsor a “welcome kit” for an incoming child.  “Children who are coming to this center usually are coming with little or not much with them, so the welcome kits that the center offers children as they come is all that the children have to start with,” she said. “That includes … all the things that a child both literally needs but also some support and something fun that they may not have coming with them.”  “It’s kind of a two-tiered approach for how to engage our alumni community … both physical labor-wise but also in terms of donating for the welcome kit.” The Alumni Association chose the Assessment Center because of its affiliation with Catholic Charities USA, with whom Notre Dame shares a connection as a partner and collaborator, Purcell said.  “We just thought it would be a great opportunity not only to serve the children who are themselves worthy of our time and energy, but also because we want to strengthen and unify our partnership as two pretty important Catholic institutions to help the common good,” Purcell said.  Any students traveling to the game who want to volunteer may sign up in the Worthington Renaissance Hotel, from which the Alumni Association will provide transportation, or show up at the Assessment Center of Tarrant County where the volunteering will take place from 2 to 5 p.m. Friday.last_img read more

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Professor discusses Mumbai

first_img.Tags: marc belanger, mumbai, saint mary’s professor marc belanger Marc Belanger, associate professor of political science at Saint Mary’s, lectured on the religious, linguistic and ethnic diversity in India on Monday at the Cushwa-Leighton Library.“For everything you can say is true about India, you can say the opposite,” Belanger said. “It ought to impress us. We don’t appreciate how democracy has survived there.”Belanger based his lecture, titled “Encountering Mumbai,” on his two-week trip sponsored by the Council on International Educational Exchange (CIEE). CIEE sponsors undergraduates’ trips abroad and hosts approximately 20 international faculty development seminars in the summer from Shanghai to Mexico City, Belanger said.Belanger said he attended a seminar titled “Twenty-first century mega cities and villages” in Mumbai. Belanger said democracy faces unique issues in India because of the country’s complex cultural and economic make-up and its role as an influential world power.“India presents a challenge in terms of its size, its importance in the world, its inequalities, its wealth and its poverty,” Belanger said. “But it’s also complex in terms of the number of cultures and languages.”As of last week, Indian Parliament demarcated Telangana as a new state, and since states in India are usually created around linguistic groups, there are 22 official languages recognized across India’s 29 states, Belanger said.“Just to be clear, we’re using the word language, not dialects, because these are not variations on Hindi,” Belanger said. “They are languages as different from Hindi as European languages are.”For example, Mumbai lies in the state of Maharashtra, and the dominant language spoken there is Marathi. Language affects a region’s identity, Belanger said.“While Mumbai paints a picture of Hindu nationalism, it’s sort of a Marathi nationalism,” Belanger said.Belanger compared the urban landscapes of India to the United States. Mumbai and New York are similar in their unusualness, Belanger said.“Mumbai is not typical of India,” Belanger said. “If you only came to New York, you would experience a very American city, but also a very unique city. It is typical and not typical of the United States. You could say the same thing about Mumbai.”Mumbai, the fifth most populated city in the world, is home to approximately 20 million people. This density results in an eclectic variety of lifestyles, Belanger said, with both squatter communities and gated communities.Belanger said when he visited Dharavi, the neighborhood featured in “Slumdog Millionaire,” he was surprised at the bustling activity of the locals, Belanger said. The recyclers there also took apart computers in order to melt down the metal and plastic parts.“Everyone was working really hard — to recycle,” Belanger said. “You’d see bag after bag of plastic bottles, you’d see bag after bag of tops of plastic bottles, bags and bags of other kinds of individual pieces of plastic.”Urban areas are often segmented, and people of different socioeconomic classes tend to live in separate worlds, but that is not the case for Mumbai, Belanger said.“You talk about zones in Mexico City or Guatemala City in terms of safety,” Belanger said. “Well, in Mumbai it’s all jumbled together. A real estate agent told us, ‘when you buy a luxury apartment, even if you’re the highest paid star in the world, you’re still going to be overlooking slums.’ You’ve got 15 million people living in a space smaller than New York City.”last_img read more

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SAO seeks senate input on new first year course

first_imgWednesday evening, representatives from the design team for the new first year course that will replace the physical education requirement delivered a presentation to Student Senate.Executive assistant to the Office of the President Mirella Riley said the primary goal of the new first year course is to give students a way to transition to college life.“It will be an opportunity to have the integration of the residential life, the academic life and it will provide a holistic approach to the education of first year students as they come in,” Riley said. “It will provide a number of methods to deliver content.“But really the idea is that there will be discussions of those sections that will be facilitated by an instructor, and that it will also build a sense of community for the students.”Riley said while the course is a certain thing, planning is still in the early stages and the design team is therefore looking for student input to help shape the course.In response to questions from some of the senators in attendance, Maureen Dawson, assistant dean in First Year of Studies, said the course would expand on the resources students receive during orientation weekend.“These courses are really common throughout the country,” Dawson said. “Ours will be different in that it’s not to help students meet academic standards; it’s really to give students the opportunity to discover themselves, see how they fit in at the University and take a very holistic approach to developing mind, body and spirit.”Dawson said students in the course will have one professor per semester, and the class’s format will include online modules.Riley said the design team is still in the early stages of deciding the name of the course, its grading system and the campus organizations that will be involved in its design. Riley asked Senators for their input over the next several weeks.Student Activities Office (SAO) program director Paul Manrique said while there are not many undergraduate students on the design team, because the team is small, student representatives will still have a say in the course’s formation.Sophomore Jake Wittenberg was elected to be the Senate’s representative to the design team, which also includes faculty and administrators.The Senate also unanimously passed a resolution amending the Student Government Constitution, moving the start date for class councils from April 1 to May 1. In his introduction of the resolution, junior class president Zach Waterson said changing the date would allow class council members more time to plan events.“In the second semester, April is the best month to plan events for your respective classes,” Waterson said. “… it’s right before finals, and also you have the whole year to figure out what kinds of events work for your class.“But unfortunately right now, the term ends on April 1 and a whole new council begins on April 1, so we don’t really have the opportunity to take advantage of that. This amendment pushes the transition back a month to May 1 to give the class council the academic year to finish planning those events.”While class council positions now start May 1, other student government positions will still begin April 1.Tags: Class Council, Jake Wittenberg, Maureen Dawson, Merilla Riley, Paul Manrique, student senate, Zach Watermanlast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s screens Raising Ms. President

first_imgErin Rice Saint Mary’s, the Center for Intercultural Leadership (CWIL) and the Girl Scouts of Northern Indiana-Michiana held a screening Wednesday evening of “Raising Ms. President,” a documentary about raising the next generation of female political leaders, followed by a panel discussion.Elaine Meyer-Lee, director of CWIL, introduced the documentary.“As you are probably well aware, despite making significant strides in achieving gender equality in this country, women still hold less than 20 percent of Congressional seats,” Meyer-Lee said. “Compared to other nations, the United States is both low and losing ground in women’s political representation. America now ranks 72nd in the world for percentage of women in its national legislature, down from 59th in 1998. We are well below Uganda, Algeria, Zimbabwe, Afghanistan and Iraq.”Statistics show that at the rate representation is improving, women will not achieve equal representation for 500 years, Meyer-Lee said. “Having more women in office not only upholds democratic values of fairness in representative government, but … various studies have also shown that the presence of more women in legislatures makes a significant difference in terms of the kind of policies that get passed,” Meyer-Lee said.The film itself focused on how society in America specifically has created an environment in which women do not feel they can or should run for public office. It highlighted programs and ways to show young girls that politics is a place for women too. Panelists in the discussion included Mayor Blair Milo from LaPorte, Indiana; Elizabeth Bennion, professor of political science and director of the American Democracy Project at Indiana University South Bend and Councilwoman Diana Hess of St. Joseph County.“What motivated me to be able to make that decision to run for office was to do something because I saw a problem in my community,” Milo said. “There seems to be a general theme [in the documentary] about how we can overcome and encourage women in particular to become a city councilwoman or a representative or a senator or the president.“I think there is a broader question of why one would want to do that. What is it you want to do in any of these particulate positions? Not to be a senator or a representative, but what is it you want to do in any of those particular positions, and that’s a key piece I think needs to be addressed when you’re encouraging individuals to run.” The film offered provocative commentary through statistics and discussion about the differences women can make, Bennion said.“I think you have a tremendous opportunity when you have more women involved,” she said. “This is not to say that men aren’t good government leaders, but you see a different dynamic in some of the conversations when women are a part of it.”Hess said growing up during the height of the feminist movement, which happened along side the Civil Rights movement and the Anti-Vietnam war movement, helped form her political sensibilities. “I saw many battles and witnessed the victories,” Hess said. “In the years since, it seems we have not gained and in many cases have lost ground, reminding me how important it is to stay engaged and remain vigilant in the political and democratic process and just how critical it is who we elect to represent us.”Tags: Center for Intercultural Leadership, Raising Ms. President, saint mary’s, Women in Politicslast_img read more

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Group examines, votes on internal issues

first_imgStudent body vice president Nidia Ruelas said student senate has done “very well” engaging in critical issues this year.“We’ve fostered together a climate of dialogue where people are talking with each other instead of to each other and when they’re engaging these issues, even if they disagree, even if they’re difficult issues,” she said. Senate’s biggest, most recent accomplishment was the passing of three resolutions regarding election reform in November, Ruelas said. The new regulations allow candidates more freedom when engaging with voters online and through social media platforms.  “That came out of a lot of dialogue, a lot of work and a lot of work was done outside of Senate,” Ruelas said. “But within Senate, the talk that was shared was very good and helpful.” Discussion and feedback on Onward, a forum for students to submit and vote on ideas, and the University’s Honor Code also had a “good input,” according to Ruelas.   “Some of the conversation regarding the academic integrity was also a huge success for Senate because they engaged the topic critically,” she said. Ruelas said senators have also done an excellent job of communicating between student government and their dorms, especially regarding the new sustainability initiatives in the dining halls. Senators are also “very active” in their departments. “For example, if they’re active through University Affairs, maybe they’re involved in things like the Huddle price scanner,” she said. With the recently released recommendations of the Core Curriculum Review Committee, Ruelas said discussing the recommended changes will be a main focus for next semester. “I think the intention is that this conversation goes out during the whole semester,” she said. Ruelas said academic integrity will be another focus as the “actual policies and recommendations are being thought up” from the University Code of Honor Committee. Diversity and inclusion will be another focus for senators to consider next semester, she said. “The other one that we want to stress is diversity and inclusion in many ways, not just racial or ethnic, but also socioeconomic. To some extent I think we’ve addressed those issues, but they’ll probably be the focus for next semester.”Ruelas says she hopes to incorporate other groups when working on issues of diversity and inclusion. “At the beginning of the year we had the diversity and inclusion training and another thing I think we can do is to foster a discussion related to the ‘It’s Time ND’ campaign that Diversity Council has led forward, so I think that things like that, bringing in speakers to talk, and maybe it would even take the form of a resolution too,” she said.Tags: Student government, student government in focus, student senatelast_img read more

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Breen-Phillips rector dies

first_imgSister Mary McNamara, rector of Breen-Phillips Hall, died Wednesday afternoon from complications resulting from a recent stroke, according to an email sent to students from vice president for student affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding. She was 67.Sister McNamara was a native of Cleveland and has served as rector of Breen-Phillips Hall since 2012.“Our deepest condolences and prayers are with the residents of Breen-Phillips Hall, fellow rectors and other members of the Residential Life team, as well as with Sister Mary’s religious community, extended family, campus colleagues and friends,” Hoffmann Harding said in the email.A memorial service for Sister McNamara will be held in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart in the coming days.Hoffmann Harding said the University Counseling Center (UCC) and Campus Ministry resources are both available to members of the Notre Dame community.Tags: Breen-Phillips Hall, rector, Sr. Mary Catherine McNamaralast_img read more

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Economist Arthur Laffer discusses tax policy, economic growth

first_imgNatalie Weber | The Observer Economist Arthur Laffer spoke on the keys to a flourishing economy and the need for a flat tax system and lower economic regulations Tuesday in a lecture hosted by the Young Americans for Freedom.Sound money, spending restraint and free trade are also key ingredients of a flourishing economy, Laffer said. Additionally, he said, a government should minimize regulations and allow the economy to operate as freely as possible.“You need regulations, but what you want to make sure is that these regulations do not go beyond [the] specific purpose at hand and create a lot of collateral damage to the economy,” he said. “So you want regulations, but you want low or minimal regulations to achieve your objective.”Laffer discussed the relative growth and decline in Gross Domestic Product per adult over the years, which hit a significant high during former president John F. Kennedy’s administration. This peak, he said, was a direct result of Kennedy’s sweeping tax cuts.“The economy growth in that period was called ‘go-go 60’s,’” Laffer said. “If you look at real Gross Domestic Product per adult de-trended, the thing goes right through the ceiling under John F. Kennedy.”Both former presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton also created tax policies conducive to growth, Laffer commented. During Laffer’s time as an advisor to Reagan, the administration enacted sweeping tax cuts, which Laffer said dramatically increased economic productivity.“We cut the highest marginal income tax rate in the U.S. from 70 percent to 28 percent,” Laffer said. “We cut the corporate rate from 46 percent to 34 percent. We cut the capital gains tax rate, deregulated the economy, proposed and wrote NAFTA. If you look at the real Gross Domestic Product per adult de-trended it just [explodes] — not quite as good as Kennedy, but it really did well.”Compared to these policy changes, the Trump administration’s recent tax reforms have brought about similar levels of economic growth, Laffer said.“What Trump did in this tax bill, which I worked on with him a lot, is he cut the highest [business tax] rate from 35 percent to 21 percent,” Laffer said. “He cut the personal income tax rate from 39.6 percent to 37 percent. He cut the pass through tax rate from 39.6 percent to 28.6 percent. … It is the best tax bill I have seen in any administration of the U.S. in the president’s first term. It’s amazing and it bests Kennedy’s [tax bill] as well.”Laffer also discussed the tax reforms of 1986, when Congress began moving towards a flat tax model, creating similar tax rates for citizens regardless of income.“We got rid of all these deductions, exemptions and exclusions and loopholes,” Laffer said. “We made it exactly revenue neutral. We cut the highest rate from 50 to 28 [percent], cut the corporate from 46 to 34 [percent], raised the lowest rate to 15 percent. We had two [tax] brackets … and that’s it.“Can you imagine that tax bill today in Congress. No? Not a chance. There wouldn’t be a Republican or a Democrat who would vote for that today. There really wouldn’t. Guess what the vote was in the Senate in 1986? The vote was 97 to 3.”Still, Laffer said he remains confident in the U.S. economy.“When you look at the state of the U.S. economy today, my view is you are going to see an enormous expansion of the U.S. economy within the next 50 years,” he said. “I think you’re going to see a real explosion of upward growth and employment and I just want you to all to know that the best, in my opinion, is yet to come.”Tags: Arthur Laffer, supply side economics, tax policy, Tax Reform, The Trump Administration Commonly known as ”the father of supply-side economics” and creator of the Laffer curve, economist Arthur Laffer advocated for a flat tax system and lower economic regulations Tuesday during a lecture hosted by the Young Americans for Freedom.To create a prosperous economy, a country should implement a low tax rate and ensure people are paying similar rates regardless of income bracket, Laffer said.“You want a low rate, broad base flax tax system,” he said. “You’ve got the low rate to provide people with the least incentives to evade, avoid or otherwise not report income and you want a broad base tax to provide people with the least number of places they can put their income and avoid taxes.”last_img read more

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Sexual assault reported at Saint Mary’s

first_imgA sexual assault was reported to the College on Friday, according to an email sent to the Saint Mary’s community. The incident, which took place the morning of March 8, posed “no immediate danger to campus,” the email said.The College has a zero tolerance policy for sexual misconduct.  According to the email, information regarding sexual assault prevention and resources for survivors of sexual assault can be found through Saint Mary’s’ Campus Ministry and the Health and Counseling Center. Tags: campus crime, sexual assault, sexual assault preventionlast_img

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Students express dejection, uncertainty, optimism in face of permanent virtual semester

first_imgAccepting online courses and virtual learningSome students believe the transition to online classes will leave them with a smaller set of tools to assist them with their education.“Normally I learn better face to face and hands-on, so I’m thinking the change to online classes will affect me in some way, but I’m not sure exactly how yet,” Notre Dame freshman Milena Fava-Pastilha said. Stalter said she anticipates working from home to be a difficult adjustment because she’s used to spending time away from school to relax with her family during breaks.“I am struggling to find a routine that is always very easily pushed on me when I am on campus because of the set times of classes and numerous extracurriculars,” Stalter said.Jessica Hardig, a Saint Mary’s junior, agreed saying the lack of routine makes it harder to find the motivation to complete her coursework.“I also was just concerned about how my grades may slip doing all my work at home instead of my ideal study spots where I focus so well such as Reignbeaux or Trumper,” she said. “I did not feel very prepared, but knew it would have to be a switch that I got used to very fast.”Some states like California and Illinois have mandated statewide orders to remain at home, which also poses concerns to students. Leutz, a native of the Chicago suburbs, said the lack of freedom to go into town is disappointing.“It is going to be hard to have to stay in my house all day long since I can’t even go to a coffee shop or something to do work,” Leutz said. Stalter said she is concerned about some of her classes that seem less conducive to the virtual setup, but her professors have been very reassuring throughout the uncertainty.“This anxiety was definitely pushed aside after receiving emails from professors and reading how empathetic they are to us and the circumstances that we are in,” she said.Stalter acknowledged how grateful she is for the professors working with students to learn how to orient their courses online.“I truly have been able to recognize the hard work that my professors do and the amount of patience and love that they have for their students during times of distress,” she said.Notre Dame junior Anna Wellen said though the current situation is unprecedented, she is prepared to adapt.“It’s going to be a big adjustment with [all of my siblings and me] trying to do our online classes, but we did just upgrade our Wi-Fi, so hopefully we’ll have enough bandwidth to [do] all the Zoom classes,” Wellen said. After learning the news that Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross would not be returning to campus for the remainder of the semester due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, students across the tri-campus community reacted with a variety of emotions to the knowledge that seniors would lose their last memories on campus and others would be separated from their respective campuses for months.Saint Mary’s senior Katy Stalter has been attempting to manage her time away from her friends, room and campus since she first heard that students would not be returning to campus. Stalter said she is shocked she won’t be able to complete her senior year on the campus she called home for four years.When she received the email, Stalter said she immediately thought, “I need to text my group message with all of my best friends and tell them that I love them.”With the decision to halt in-person classes for the rest of the semester — announced a week after a notice to suspend in-person classes for 4 weeks at the three institutions — Notre Dame senior Sam Jones said he originally thought he might have the chance to live on campus as a student once more. However, Jones quickly realized the possibility of returning was slim.“I liked the idea that we were going to pause and wait two weeks and then come back and reevaluate, so I was kind of disappointed that we didn’t end up doing that,” Jones said. “But at the same time, I was not surprised by the ultimate decision since other colleges were canceling for the rest of the semester.”Holy Cross junior Rylee Horn said in a text that although she would not be able to spend the rest of the semester with her friends, she understood why the decision was made.Although the majority of students have returned home, their belongings remain on campus. Jones, a resident assistant in Stanford Hall, said he does not know what move out will look like but hopes to have it as a chance to say goodbye to his section mates. “I’d like to see all my guys, and I know it probably won’t happen, but I’d like to help them move out just to get closure,” Jones said. Stalter also said she she’s concerned about graduation with her fellow seniors in May, but she remains hopeful.Unlike students in residence halls, off-campus students face a different situation: stay in their current housing or pack up and return to their hometown. Notre Dame senior Nina Leutz decided to choose the latter option.“Some of my friends  not many, but some of them, are staying in their off-campus houses, but there’s nothing to do in South Bend since everything is closing,” Leutz said.  A new reality outside of the tri-campus communityWith the novel COVID-19 disrupting not only the semester but also the proceedings of everyday life, seniors worry about the job offers they accepted for the summer or fall, juniors await the rescheduling of graduate school exams and undergraduates wonder if their summer internships will fall through.While Jones has yet to worry about his personal post-graduation plans for next fall, he explained that he has seen stress in some peers in his senior class.“All of a sudden, everyone in my class has come to the realization that a month ago, we were pretty confident with our post-grad plans and now there’s a chance of offers being rescinded,” Jones said. Meanwhile, Wellen’s plan to take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) in April will likely be postponed, but she said she is not too concerned, given that college students across the nation are dealing with the same circumstances.“It’s probably getting pushed back, but that’s okay because I’ll just be able to study more, which I wasn’t able to do as much on campus due to my involvement with extracurriculars,” Wellen said. For Fava-Pastilha, the severity of COVID-19 could potentially affect her summer as she was planning on interning in New York City.“I don’t know what kind of effect this is going to have on my internship,” Fava-Pastilha said. “If this whole situation will last well into the summer, I might lose that opportunity.”Horn said the disruption to the semester has also affected student preparations for the future.“There has been a lot of struggles with the cancellations of in-person classes and activities, one of which is HCC’s student government association,” Horn said in a text. “We now have to resort to online meetings to prepare the incoming President and VP for the next school year.”For many seniors, it is difficult to process how their final weeks have already come to a close.“It is very hard to suddenly leave a place that you have called ‘home’ and return to the ‘home’ that you left many years ago,” Stalter said.Despite the uncertainty, Leutz remains optimistic that she will be able to return to Notre Dame for a last farewell.“I’m still hopeful that senior week still happens and that graduation still happens,” Leutz said.Tags: COVID-19, Holy Cross, Notre Dame, Online classes, post-graduation, saint mary’slast_img read more

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