Drop in Solar Stocks ‘More Perception Than True Fundamentals’

first_imgDrop in Solar Stocks ‘More Perception Than True Fundamentals’ FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Joe Ryan and Brian Eckhouse for Bloomberg News:Despite the ups and downs, the general trend is up. Developers will install 48.4 GW of solar by the end of 2020, more than double the amount in the prior five years, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Problems at a few major companies don’t necessarily carry over to the rest. At least they shouldn’t.“It’s more perception than true fundamentals,” said Angelo Zino, analyst at S&P Global Market Intelligence. “The fundamentals continue to improve.’’That means there may be bargains, said Leslie D. Biddle, a partner at Serengeti Asset Management, a $1.5bn New York hedge fund that specializes in distressed debt. “At the moment,’’ Biddle said, “solar equities are a buying opportunity.’’Solar investors remain rattled, with legitimate questions about leverage and financing. The markets are looking for proof that companies can make and install panels profitably.“Investors lost a lot of money on SunEdison – and quickly,” said Carl Weatherley-White, former president of developer Lightbeam Electric Co. “They’re nervous. We’ll need to see a steady quarter or two of success by the public companies.”Against that expectation, the drumbeat of bad news continues. Abengoa SA, a builder of solar-thermal power plants, is seeking investor support for a 9.4 bn-euro ($10.7bn) debt restructuring plan to avoid becoming Spain’s largest corporate failure. And last week, hedge fund manager Jim Chanos said SolarCity, which is down more than 50% this year, will face more “financial trouble” in 2016, in part because the largest U.S. rooftop solar provider loses money on every installation. His view was backed up Monday when SolarCity posted a wider first-quarter loss than analysts were expecting.While there are a variety of reasons Wall Street has soured on solar, the conversation always comes around to SunEdison, the industry’s biggest-ever failure, which cited $16.1bn in liabilities when it sought protection from creditors April 21.The company spent billions on a debt-fueled buying binge, which peaked in July when it announced plans to acquire the rooftop installer Vivint Solar Inc. for $2.2bn. The deal prompted analysts to take a closer look at SunEdison’s finances, revealing an overleveraged, overcomplicated behemoth that’s financially entangled with two publicly traded holding companies.‘’It is impossible for people not to be concerned when the leader nosedives like that,” said Shawn Kravetz, founder of Esplanade Capital LLC, a Boston fund manager with a decade of investing experience in solar.SunEdison’s decline shows another unusual trend. In past boom-bust cycles, the carnage was within specific parts of the solar industry; sometimes manufacturers, other times developers. This time, it’s both.Financial problems are hardly isolated to the marquee names, said John Berger, CEO of the closely held residential solar installer Sunnova Energy Corp. Many solar companies have “growth-at-any-cost’’ business models that are neither profitable nor sustainable. “When you don’t generate the returns for the equity holders that they are expecting, you don’t make money,” Berger said. “There are a lot of management teams in this sector that haven’t figured that out.’’Ethan Zindler, a BNEF analyst, said the economics of solar economics have never been better, given low equipment costs and surging demand. “But that’s not reflected in the share prices.”Riding the ‘Solarcoaster’ as Shares Plunge Even More Than Coallast_img read more

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Japan’s new energy policy targets carbon emissions, pushes renewables and nuclear

first_imgJapan’s new energy policy targets carbon emissions, pushes renewables and nuclear FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Associated Press:Japan is calling for further efforts to cut carbon emissions by promoting renewables but also nuclear energy despite the 2011 Fukushima reactors meltdowns.The energy white paper, adopted by the Cabinet Friday, said Japan faces an “urgent task” of reducing carbon emissions coming from utilities that have relied heavily on fossil fuels to make up for shortages of cleaner nuclear energy. The call comes as the Fukushima nuclear reactors are slowly being restarted amid lingering anti-nuclear sentiments since the 2011 crisis.Japan wants further development of renewable energy and set a 22% to 24% target while maintaining nuclear energy at around the same level. It also pledged to reduce carbon emissions by 26% from 2013 levels by 2030. So far it has achieved a 7% reduction and is making progress but needs more effort, the paper said. It said the cost of renewables also needs to come down.While the renewables account for 16% of Japan’s energy supply, nuclear energy remained at just 3% in 2017, compared to the target of 20% to 22%, according to the paper. Coal and natural gas accounted for 74%.Before the 2011 quake and tsunami that destroyed the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant’s cooling systems and sent three of its reactors into meltdowns, nuclear energy made up about one-third of Japan’s energy supply.More: Japan plans carbon emission cuts, more nuclear energylast_img read more

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PBJ: The Perfect Trail Food

first_imgThe object of my desire.I drove up to the Blue Ridge Parkway the other day and attempted a hike to St. Marys Falls in the St. Marys Wilderness. I say attempted because I was turned away at the trailhead and told the trail was closed due to wildfires. As I stared blankly at the man delivering this news, sniffing the air for any hint of smoke – and finding none – I became frustrated that my plan was being stymied by a wildfire I barely believed existed. Sometimes when stuff like this happens to me, I will fly into a rage and curse everyone, maybe throw a head fake or scream, “Look over there!” and sprint down the trail anyway. (I have a slight problem with authority, especially when I think authority is being an idiot.)This did not happen. I was able to keep my composure because I had a secret weapon: the PBJ.While its exact origins are subject to myths, legends, and fables involving 1900s entrepreneurs, WWII soldiers and Smuckers, the Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich has been a staple of American Cuisine since the turn of the century and the bane of elementary school kids since the first mom threw a PBJ in a paper bag. Something about the combination of peanut butter, jelly, and bread, resonates with Americans. Why? Who knows, this is America and that’s what we like, and that’s that.My own personal history with the PBJ has had its ups and downs. When I was a kid, long before Taco Bell had the idea, my buddies and I supplemented the usual ingredients with Nacho Cheese Doritos, adding a satisfying crunch to the mix. When I was in high school, I ate two every night before bed in an misguided effort to bulk up for lacrosse season. This is one of the all-time backfires; a mistake my body and mind are still trying to recover from a decade later. In college, we used the George Forman Grill on our PBJ, and everything else for that matter.Over the years I have found the PBJ to be just about the perfect trail food. Trail mix GORP advocates may scoff at the idea, but I stand my ground. It’s easy to make, filling, and delicious, but the best part is that the more beat up it gets in your pack, the better it tastes. That’s why I like to pack mine in a sandwich bag or foil. I love digging a PBJ out of my pack and finding it squashed and mangled, its jelly filling having soaked through the bread in a fruit preserve osmosis scientists are still trying to figure out. If you are skiing and pull a forgotten half frozen one out of your pack, it’s like finding an oasis in the desert.Scenic OverlookMy PBJ lead me here.But back to the story. So, having been rebuked from my original plan – and deciding not to fight everyone – my number one priority shifted from “Get to the spot to take some photos and check it out for a story because it’s my job,” to, “Find a nice, quiet place to sit and eat this PBJ I packed for lunch.” So I backtracked a few miles and pulled into the next turnoff that had hiking access, took a quick look at the map, and set off down the trail. I didn’t particularly know where I was going or what I would find, I just knew that I had a PBJ and a peach in my pack and if I didn’t find a place to eat it, I might as well go ahead and wander into that theoretical wildfire.The thought of that PBJ saved my trip as far as I’m concerned; if I had packed a ham and cheese, things could have turned out way different – something I don’t really want to think about. I had a pleasant hike, ate my lunch at the bottom of a waterfall and broke a significant sweat, so all in all it was a success.The moral of the story: When life gives you lemons, make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Here’s how:Ingredients: Two (2) slices wheat bread, crunchy peanut butter, strawberry jelly. Crunchy is essential and don’t even try to put %*#@&#@ing grape jelly on there. Get out of here with your grape jelly. Blackberry is as far as I’ll go.Step 1: Spread a slice of bread with a generous amount of jelly (always do the jelly first or your mom will yell at you for ruining the jar by getting peanut butter in there. Apparently, contaminating peanut butter with bits of jelly is cool). Then do the same with the peanut butter on the other slice of bread.Step 2: Place the covered bread slices together with their respective toppings facing each other. THIS IS THE KEY ELEMENT! If you perform this step wrong, you will have to start again…you will also make a mess and get yelled at by your mom again.last_img read more

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Endangered Species Act: Success or Failure?

first_imgThe Center for Biological Diversity found that the Endangered Species Act (ESA) had a very successful recovery rate, with some 90 percent of species recovering at the rate specified by their recovery plans. The recovery of theYellowstone Grizzly Bear is considered to be an ESA success story. Photo Cred: U.S. Fish & Wildlife ServiceEarthTalk®E – The Environmental MagazineDear EarthTalk: Do environmentalists think the Endangered Species Act has been a success or failure with regard to protecting biodiversity in the U.S.?                        — Ron McKnight, Trenton, NJWhile that very question has been a subject of debate already for decades, most environmental advocates are thankful such legislation is in place and proud of their government for upholding such high standards when it comes to preserving rare species of plants and animals.That said, critics of the legislation make some solid points. For starters, only one percent of species (20 out of 2,000) under the protection of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) have recovered sufficiently to qualify for delisting. And the millions of dollars spent on often failed recovery efforts are difficult to justify, especially in these otherwise tough economic times.But even though the vast majority of species protected under the ESA have not recovered doesn’t undermine the significance of those species—bald eagles, gray wolves, and grizzly bear to name a few—that have rebounded thanks to forward thinking legislation and wildlife management. Louisa Wilcox of the Natural Resources Defense Council is grateful to the ESA for the continued existence of grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park. “After listing, the government cleaned up the massive garbage problems in Yellowstone Park, which reduced the habituation of bears to human foods—a pattern that often leads to grizzly deaths,” she reports. Commercial sheep herds were moved out of core grizzly habitat while hundreds of miles of roads on public lands in the region were closed to improve the iconic bears’ chances for survival. The result: The Yellowstone grizzly population more than doubled while human/bear interactions and incursions by hungry grizzlies onto local ranches have declined. “So, by any reckoning, the Yellowstone grizzly bear story is an ESA success,” concludes Wilcox.To test whether or not the ESA has been effective on a grander scale, the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD), another leading green group, compared for its 2012 “On Time, On Target” report the actual recovery rate of 110 listed species with the projected recovery rate in their federal recovery plans. The 110 species occupy all 50 U.S. states, include all major taxonomic groups, and have various listing lengths.CBD found that the ESA had “a remarkably successful recovery rate: 90 percent of species are recovering at the rate specified by their federal recovery plan,” adding: “On average, species recovered in 25 years, while their recovery plan predicted 23 years—a 91 percent timeliness accomplishment.”CBD also confirmed the hypothesis that the majority of listed species have not enjoyed protection for long enough to warrant an expectation of recovery yet. “80 percent of species have not yet reached their expected recovery year,” reports CBD, adding that on average species have been listed for just 32 years, while their recovery plans required 46 years for success. This recent study’s findings echo the results of an earlier (2006) analysis in the Northeastern U.S. that found some 93 percent of federally listed species there were stabilized or improving since getting ESA protection and 82 percent were on track to meet recovery goals. “When judged in the light of meeting recovery plan timelines for recovery, the Endangered Species Act is remarkably successful,” says CBD. “Few laws of any kind can boast a 90 percent success rate.”CONTACTS: CBD, www.biologicaldiversity.org; “On Time, On Target” Report, www.esasuccess.org. EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E – The Environmental Magazine ( www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: [email protected] Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.last_img read more

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The Best Small Mountain Town

first_img A.T. Register RUNNERS UPDAVIS, W.VA.Davis is one of those mountain towns with so much going on, it’s hard to wrap your head around it, but this quaint West Virginia hamlet is best known for its world-class mountain biking. Ride out from town and in two minutes you can be on bomber singletrack like the rugged Plantation Trail or the appropriately named Moon Rocks. The opposite side of town features the trails of Blackwater State Park and the Dobbin House system and a great view of Blackwater Canyon. Literally everywhere you look there is a mountain bike trail, so stop by Blackwater Bicycles for all the beta before heading out.The Blackwater River and its tributaries are stocked with trout, so bring your rod in the spring and fall. In winter, hit the slopes at Canaan Valley or Timberline for alpine and White Grass for miles of backcountry cross-country skiing. No visit to Davis would be complete without resting those quads at Hellbenders with a Mountain State brew and a burrito as big as your face. The locals are very friendly so don’t be afraid to chat them up at the bar.LEWISBURG, W.VA.Lewisburg is the cultural center of West Virginia. Just a few miles from the Virginia/West Virginia border, it’s home to one of only four Carnegie Halls in the world. Its entire downtown is designated a National Register Historic District, so stepping into Lewisburg is like stepping back in time.It’s also fast becoming the outdoor center of West Virginia. The Greenbrier River flows just east of town and is a beautiful smallmouth bass fishery, and its tributaries run cold and clear, holding wild brook trout. From Lewisburg, you can easily hop on the 78-mile Greenbrier River trail or hike one of the many trails in nearby Greenbrier State Forest. Not into roughing it? Just down the road in White Sulphur Springs is the Greenbrier Resort, a luxury resort tailored to outdoor-minded folks.CLOSE CONTENDERSBREVARD, N.C.The gateway to Pisgah, Brevard is the capital of mountain biking in the Blue Ridge. Dupont Forest is just down the road, and hikers, trail runners, and anglers flock to the Davidson River.LURAY, VA.Surrounded by Shenandoah National Park, this valley town famous for its caverns has fishing and canoeing on the Shenandoah River to the west and cycling on Skyline Drive to the east.DAMASCUS, VA.Trail Town, USA is at the crossroads of the A.T., Virginia Creeper, and Iron Mountain Trails. One of Virginia’s best trout streams, Whitetop Laurel, and Mount Rogers are right outside town.BRYSON CITY, N.C.Tubing on Deep Creek, biking at Tsali, hiking in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, running the Nantahala—what more could you ask for in a mountain town?FAYETTEVILLE, W.VA.There is more to this town than just anchoring one side of the New River Bridge. This funky paddling town bordering the New River is also the gateway to the new Arrowhead Trail System, a boy scout built mountain bike mecca.BLAIRSVILLE, GA.Blairsville is the closest town to the state’s highest point, and toughest cycling climb, Brasstown Bald, while Nottely Lake provides endless open water recreation opportunities.BLUE RIDGE, GA.A gem of north Georgia, the Trout Capital of Georgia is surrounded by the Chattahoochee National Forest and is on the banks of the Toccoa River and Lake Blue Ridge. The Cohutta Wilderness is the largest in the East.CASHIERS-HIGHLANDS, N.C.Double dip with these twin towns inside Nantahala National Forest. Panthertown Valley, Whiteside Mountain and the Cullasaja River await your visit.OHIOPYLE, PA.What Ohiopyle lacks in population (60 people), it makes up with some of the best whitewater in the U.S. on the Youghiogheny River and hiking in Ohiopyle State Park.CHEROKEE, N.C.Cherokee has some of the best trout fishing in N.C. and is the southern gateway of the Blue Ridge Parkway. Nestled beside Great Smoky Mountains National Park, it’s an ideal hiking and backpacking trailhead.PEMBROKE, VA.Flanked by Jefferson National Forest, Pembroke is the take out for one of the most scenic sections of the New River—and also one of the most idyllic fishing spots, with abundant smallmouth and musky.WAYNESVILLE, N.C.Just west of Asheville, Waynesville has great access to Great Smoky Mountains National Park and more rivers than you could fish.FRANKLIN, N.C.Seems all roads lead to this town smack in the middle of Nantahala National Forest, which is great for cycling or taking in the vast amount of area waterfalls like Bridal Veil.SYLVA, N.C.With the Smokies just north and the Tuckasegee River flowing just to the west, Sylva is a fly fisherman’s nirvana.ELLIJAY, GA.This gateway to Chattahoochee National Forest is quickly gaining a mountain biking reputation and is also close to A.T. terminus Springer Mountain.WHITESBURG, KY.Bad Branch Gorge and Breaks Interstate Park are both within easy driving distance of this art community.SLADE, KY.Inside Daniel Boone National Forest, Slade is the launch point for treks into the Red River Gorge and its epic hiking and climbing. • Lover’s Leap: The A.T.’s first trail town holds a special place in the heart of Northbound thru-hikers.Named for the only natural hot spring in the state, the town has long been a destination for those seeking its healing powers. In 1837 Hot Springs reached its zenith as a destination resort when James Patton built the 350-room Warm Springs Hotel on the site of the spring. When that hotel burned 46 years later, another was built in its place, complete with lavish marble-lined tubs, tennis courts and the Southeast’s first organized golf club and 9-hole course. Things were looking up for Hot Springs, until that luxury hotel burned down as well. Following several more hotel burnings and rebuildings, Hot Springs was almost forgotten as a tourist destination and virtually fell off the map.Today, however, Hot Springs is again attracting visitors from all over the United States and beyond, and not just for the 108-degree mineral water. Nestled in the heart of Pisgah National Forest, the town is located at the crossroads of two of the most important outdoor resources in western N.C.: the Appalachian Trail and the French Broad River.“The three pillars of the town are the hot springs and the Hot Springs Campground; the river with the rafting, canoeing, and kayaking; then the trails, the A.T., and all the side trails around here,” explained Wayne Crosby, owner of Bluff Mountain Outfitters.The A.T. literally runs right through downtown: the sidewalk outside Bluff Mountain is marked with white blazes. Hot Springs is the first major town hikers pass through when heading north from Springer Mountain, Ga. This first trail town designation is one reason why thru-hikers have a special place in their heart for Hot Springs: after a humbling 200 miles, that first hot shower can leave quite an impression. When asking locals how they ended up in Hot Springs, more often than not you’ll hear a story that begins with “Well, I thru-hiked the A.T.…” and ends with “…and then I moved back.” This is the story of Crosby, who thru-hiked when he was 19 years old and spent a couple weeks in town painting porches. This is also the path of Sunny Riggs, who hiked the A.T. in 2002 and returned to open ArtiSUN Gallery, a local art boutique and café in the historic Iron Horse Station Inn building.Randy Anderson, more commonly referred to by his trail name “Chuck Norris,” jumped at the chance to relocate to Hot Springs and give back to the town that buoyed his spirits and re-energized his aching legs during his thru-hike. He now manages the newly re-opened Laughing Heart Hostel, which sits a literal stone’s throw from the northern terminus of the A.T. as it comes into town. The hostel hosted over 850 hikers in its first spring, and Anderson says the draw of the town is just as powerful as ever.“In the hostel we have come close to coming up with a three-day maximum stay because hikers get to town and they decide they like it so much that four days have gone by and they’re still here,” he said. “So we have to nudge them along quite often because they start to make this home and they really like the small town feeling.”The small town feeling is definitely hard to escape when visiting Hot Springs, mainly because it only has about 650 permanent residents. The population swells in the spring as northbound thru-hikers come through town, and in the summer when the French Broad, Spring Creek, and Laurel River attract whitewater and tubing enthusiasts from around the South. Folks also flock to the town for section hikes like the 20-mile Max Patch to Hot Springs overnight, and day hiking loops connected to the A.T. near town like the Pump Gap Loop and Roundtop Ridge. The French Broad attracts anglers with its smallmouth bass and musky fishing, while the abundant small creeks in the area hold healthy populations of trout. Hot Springs is also gaining a reputation as a romantic weekend and wedding spot. With accommodations ranging from $15 campsites to plush lodges in the several-hundred-a-night category, there is something for everyone right within the town limits.Despite the influx of out-of-towners, the locals have embraced visitors and now designate themselves the ‘Most Welcoming’ town on the A.T. Hikers low on funds frequently trade lodging for yard work at places like Laughing Heart and legendary A.T. hostel Elmer’s Sunnybank Inn, or take part in town-wide Thursday night potluck dinners. The town also hosts several music and outdoor festivals that draw thousands on any given weekend.“Our focus is on nature and people,” says Sandy West, who manages the Hot Springs Spa with her husband, Rod. “We have no franchises, we have no red light, we are new to the cell phone world. Many people who live in Hot Springs do not have a car so they do not leave the area and yet, they are here and very open to people who visit.”The people of Hot Springs have embraced the town’s new identity as an outdoor destination at the crossroads of the A.T. and the French Broad. But it is the true small town atmosphere that keeps visitors coming back year after year.“We have figured out who we are and where we’re going. We’re pretty comfortable with that,” said Anderson. “This is a town that not only has a river that runs through it, but has the world’s most celebrated trail running through it. How cool is that?”Best Mountain Towns – Hot Springs from Summit Publishing on Vimeo.HOT SPRINGS QUICK HITS5 minutesFollow the white blazes across the bridge over the French Broad and get on the Lover’s Leap trail for great overlooks of the town and river. Finish with a soak at one of the streamside tubs at the Hot Springs Spa and a bite from Cliff at The Food Shack.15 minutesHead east out of town to Route 208 and fish the delayed harvest section of Big Laurel Creek. Hike or ride the railroad grade Laurel River Trail to the abandoned mining town of Runion.30 minutesVenture south to one of the most spectacular balds in the southern Appalachians, Max Patch. Grab a raft or kayak and paddle the Class III-IV Section 9 of the French Broad as it comes into town. Downtown Hot Springs The Laughing Heart Lodge and Hostel is a stone’s throw from the A.T. Trail town: The sidewalk of downtown Hot Springs is marked with the A.T.’s white blazes. Laughing Heart Lodge and Hostellast_img read more

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The Real Paleo Diet: Less Hunter, More Gatherer

first_imgWhen it comes to what we eat, Americans have long chosen the path of least resistance. It’s been that way ever since the advent of fast food chains, microwave ovens, and the highly processed, pre-packaged convenience foods found on modern grocery store shelves, and the trend has had disastrous effects on our nation’s overall health and well-being. With more than one-third of our citizens overweight, we lead the world in obesity levels, and we shell out more money to treat preventable ailments — diabetes and heart disease just to name a few — than any other nation on earth. But our troubling health epidemic hasn’t gone unnoticed or untreated. Public awareness about our collective weight issue is at an all-time high, and the trendy diets are more prevalent than ever.One of the most popular is the “Paleo” or “Cave Man Diet.” Based on the premise that our bodies are biologically adapted to consume only that which appeared on the menus of our cave-dwelling, prehistoric ancestors, the Paleo plan promotes lean meat consumption and avoiding any modern convenience food that wasn’t hunted or gathered by nomads living from 2.6 million years ago to 10,000 B.C. Paleo advocates claim that only by abandoning agriculturally based diets, which are “out of sync with human biology,” can we begin to live fuller, healthier, longer lives. Many even go so far as to suggest the elimination of legumes and other veggies like tomatoes and eggplant. The number one tenet in the paleo diet’s detailed mission statement is an increase in daily protein intake. According to the diet’s creator and founder of the modern paleo movement, Dr. Loren Cordain, augmented meat consumption is afforded such high priority because that is exactly the way that our ancient Paleolithic ancestors would have had it. “In our laboratories we looked at 229 hunter gatherer societies,” Cordain said in a recent television interview, “and data from our findings suggests that the average meat intake was about 55% of calories.”“Paleo allows me to remain healthy and happy,” Cordain says, “and I’m truly gratified when I hear anecdotal evidence about the way in which it has changed people’s lives for the better.” It is Cordain’s finding that 55% of the Paleolithic diet was based in meat consumption that certain qualified individuals take issue with when critiquing the Paleo diet. One such individual is Harvard evolutionary biologist Daniel Lieberman, who argues that gathering provided far more calories than hunting for our paleo ancestors. “There is a lot of good information to be gleaned from the dietary habits of Paleolithic era hominids,” Lieberman told me. “But it’s important that we critically evaluate these habits and apply only that which makes good, sound biological sense. Just because Paleolithic people may have eaten something doesn’t necessarily mean it is a healthy option for the modern human.”He went on to explain: “There is no one paleo diet. These people existed for millions of years and inhabited many different corners of the globe. Trying to pinpoint one homogenous Paleolithic diet is neither feasible nor rooted in evolutionary study.” According to Lieberman, early humans used persistence hunting—literally chasing animals to death—as a way to supplement their staple foods like foraged tubers, insects and other wild plants, but meat was more of a hard-earned luxury than an everyday menu item like many modern Paleo diet advocates often claim. Most Paleolithic humans couldn’t possibly ensure that their daily diet was made up of 55% lean meats because, on the rare occasion that they actually ate meat, they literally had to chase it to death. Even when successful, they were likely forced to share the kill with other members of a growing tribe.Bipedal hominids who lived during this time frame are believed to have eaten anything and everything they could—including insects, scavenged entrails, and dozens of varieties of fruits, nuts, seeds, and tubers. Rather than emphasizing meat, a true Paleo diet should probably place more emphasis on the seasonality and wide variety of natural, unprocessed food sources, mainly from plants. This isn’t to say that we modern humans can’t derive valuable lessons from the lifestyles and culinary habits of our ancient ancestors. For instance, cutting as many processed foods from your diet as you possibly can is always a good thing, and implementing locally sourced, native plant foods will almost certainly benefit your health.But you should probably stop short of banishing legumes and tomatoes while freely consuming heaping portions of free-range bacon and porterhouse steaks.last_img read more

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Fridays on the Fly: Fly Fishing Video Round Up

first_imgEveryone needs a little inspiration from time to time, even if it comes in the form of a short video rather than a real life experience. Luckily, the world of fly fishing is ripe with top-notch, high production quality videos, many of which are capable of inspiring viewers to get out on the water and experience the real thing.With this goal in mind, we’ve curated a list of some of our favorite fly fishing films currently floating around the internet. Enjoy, but don’t blame us when your end of week work plans are completely derailed by the call of the nearest trout stream.Backcountry Browns in Middle Tennessee.“The backcountry of New Zealand holds a special place in the heart of all Kiwis. “Going bush” is a national past-time, and Kiwi fly fishers like nothing better than the sun on their backpack, the cold touch of a mountain stream and the opportunity to sight fishing to giant trout in pristine settings.”“While we are waiting for the fresh Salmon season to get started we decided to go target some brookies at la réserve faunique du Saint-Maurice. Good times and great fly fishing vibes in the wild.”“This is as much about the insurmountable distance between the camera and the subject as it is about the indefinable draw of fly fishing.”“A fragment of Mel Krieger’s “Patagonia – 40 years fly fishing in ARGENTINA – this is for us the most motional and beautiful few thoughts about fly fishing describing the very essence of being a fly fisherman…”last_img read more

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The Forest Service Is Protecting Pipelines Instead of Public Lands

first_img With multiple tree sitters in Jefferson National Forest blocking the path of pipeline construction crews, the United States Forest Service (USFS) has responded aggressively. They have denied food and water to tree-sitters, blocked support and medical attention from reaching them, and have essentially acted as a private security force for the corporations behind the Mountain Valley Pipeline.The Forest Service’s active support of the Mountain Valley Pipeline conflicts with the agency’s mission, infringes upon First Amendment rights, and defies overwhelming public opinion.When the tree-sitter known as Nutty went up in the monopod blockade that blocked a forest service road for 57 days, the Forest Service’s response was to cut off her access to food and water, set up 24-hour surveillance underneath her suspended platform, and attempt to bully the public into submission by arbitrarily arresting observers and shining spotlights on the support camp and monopod all night long. USFS subsequently enacted similar blockades around the tree-sits of Deckard and Fern.Yet the United States Forest Service is responsible for “managing public lands, helping people share and enjoy the forest, while conserving the environment for generations to come.” On their website, they claim that “some activities are compatible. Some are not.” The act of allowing an external non-government organization to exploit and destroy large areas of National Forest for their own private gain, and to actively aid in the construction of this pipeline, seems to goes against the very purpose of the agency. This 42” diameter fracked gas pipeline would be drilled under mountains and through unstable karst terrain, and would cross numerous fragile wetlands and streams. Its presence would not help “to sustain healthy, diverse, and productive forests and grasslands,” but instead would do the opposite.The Forest Service has the power to review projects and reject any use of public lands that would cause irreparable harm to forest function. Instead, they chose to make amendments to the region’s Forest Protection Plan in order to relax regulations that otherwise would have prevented this pipeline from moving forward. In early May, the 4th US Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments in Sierra Club (et al.) v. U.S. Forest Service. Chief Judge Roger Gregory noted that the Forest Service was initially highly skeptical of Mountain Valley’s assurances that its erosion and sediment control measures would be 79 percent effective. But as the approval process neared an end, the agency backed down. “I call that capitulation,” observed Gregory. In addition to acting against its own stated mission, USFS contravened the oath taken by all federal employees to “support and defend the Constitution of the United States” when the Forest Supervisor for Jefferson and Washington National Forests, Joby Timm, ordered a series of “emergency closure orders” under false pretenses.The Forest Service does have the authority to close certain areas of National Forests, however, their Federal Register states:“time, place, and manner restrictions are unconstitutional if they are ‘designed to suppress expression’ therefore, the Forest Service can apply these regulations as long as the purpose is not to overpower the constitutional rights of the public and press.”Joby Timm implies the real reason for the closure orders in his recent statement to Rolling Stone: “Current law and federal policy emphasize the important role of national forests in energy generation and transmission.” As Timm indicated when he revised USFS rules to accommodate MVP, his decisions are meant to support the call for expedited environmental review processes for “high priority infrastructure projects” in an executive order signed by President Trump last year.Timm’s statements, along with the timing of the five different closure orders in direct response to the appearance of aerial blockades, implies that the closures were put in place not for “public safety” but to suppress the protests and expedite the construction of the pipeline, which infringes upon First Amendment rights. A lawsuit brought against the USFS in early May by Virginia Senator Chap Petersen argues these same points.In clear defiance of public sentiment, the United States Forest Service has become a private security detail working for the Mountain Valley Pipeline. They have strayed far from their intended purpose and instead turned into a bureaucratic institution more interested in turning a profit than serving the people. It seems that pressure from exploitative and extractive industries have all but dismantled the true objective of the agency to “Care for the Land and Serve People.”A protester known as Fern, the latest person to erect an aerial blockade in Jefferson National Forest, said it best in a Facebook post to the public:“State agencies entrusted with public lands are in clear collusion with extractive enterprise, and this should be a rational expectation as long as there is the potential for cash flow between corporations with an interest in exploiting or abusing public lands and those who mediate or regulate access to them. EQT (by proxy) may be seen as “reimbursing” the Forest Service for costs incurred in the process of pipeline construction, but how is this different than a financial interest greasing the palm of any government agent to use its power to smooth the path to money making?” last_img read more

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Member of NC rescue squad dies while searching for hiker who fell from Whitewater Falls

first_imgEldon Jamison, 71, a 40+ year member of the Glenville-Cashiers Rescue Squad (GCRS), died Tuesday while searching for a person who had fallen into the water at the base of Whitewater Falls.  On Monday, May 4, Jackson County Emergency Management received a call about a person who had fallen into the water at the base of the waterfall. The victim, 24-year-old Chandler Manuel from Rockwell, N.C., had been hiking with a group of people, including his brother, on the Foothills Trail. At the time of the incident, the Whitewater Falls area was closed to the public, though the trail leading to the area below the falls was open. Photo of Upper Whitewater Falls – Courtesy of Getty Images Members of the GCRS responded to the emergency, including a rugged remote high line operations repelling team from GCRS. Jamison, a longtime member of squad, fell from a rope as he searched for Manuel. His body was retrieved from the bottom of the falls by the National Guard N.C. Heart helicopter team, Jackson County Emergency Management said in a press release.  Eldon Jamison was a “Great man,” one commenter said on the Jackson County Emergency Management Facebook page. “[I] worked with him for 35 years. Friendly, caring and so dedicated in helping others! He will be missed greatly!” Before his death, Jamison held many offices within the Glenville-Cashiers Rescue Squad, including Captain and Assistant Captain, and he was one of the original employees of the Glenville-Cashiers EMS, joining the force in 1984. He was widowed and leaves behind three children. The search for Manuel continued on Wednesday. His body was located at 3:45 at the bottom of Whitewater Falls, where he was last seen.last_img read more

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Seabees, JTF-Bravo Fulfill Continuing Promise Projects in Suriname

first_img The eight nation, four-month humanitarian civic assistance mission, Continuing Promise 2010, was in its third day of operations in its final country visit, Suriname, when the USS Iwo Jima was suddenly redirected to Haiti to offer assistance in the wake of Tropical Storm Thomas to the people of that already stressed Caribbean nation. To fulfill Continuing Promise’s medical and construction project commitments to the government and people of Suriname, the United States Southern Command quickly directed two new missions to the South American country. Surinamers were cooperative and understanding of the sudden change in plans, and have since welcomed the work of 19 Seabees who arrived on November 5, from the Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 7, to complete the three construction projects started by Iwo Jima. “This is just another example of our ‘Can Do’ spirit, because we’re committed to supporting Navy efforts in the region by joining Continuing Promise,” said Chief Steel Worker Gene Murphy, NMCB 7 team leader according to Navy.mil. The Seabees have provided significant carpentry, plumbing, and electrical work to ensure completion of three humanitarian assistance projects in Suriname . They renovated the Rebecca Scheltz Girls Home by demolishing and reinstalling two fire escapes, repairing the electrical system, building a new pavilion, installing interior flooring, painting the interior and exterior walls and renovating a bathroom dormitory. The Seabees constructed a new 16’ by 32’ building for the Para District Region Library, located about an hour from the Surinamese capital. The work for this project included building bookshelves, tables and chairs, painting the building and installing all power, lights, A/C, windows, doors and insulation. In addition to major plumbing renovations at the A.J.D. Wijdenbosch Kleuterschool, a school for pre-school and kindergarten aged children, the Seabees are repairing fences and installing new playground equipment. To fulfill the commitment of Continuing Promise 2010 to provide medical care services, USSOUTHCOM Operations has directed Joint Task Force Bravo –one of three task forces under USSOUTHCOM- to deploy to Suriname. The primary mission of the surgeons from the task force includes completing six surgeries on critical patients in Suriname, ranging from the removal of tumors and masses, to biopsies and lesion excisions, according to LTC Eric Milstrey, main planner for the mission at the USSOUTHCOM Surgeon Office. The surgeries will be carried out by the team of JTF-Bravo surgeons in local Surinamese hospitals in cooperation with local medical personnel as well. By Dialogo November 22, 2010last_img read more

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