Greece: Premier’s worrying embrace of hostile media group

first_imgNews Receive email alerts RSF_en Follow the news on Greece Organisation January 26, 2017 Greece: Premier’s worrying embrace of hostile media group April 29, 2021 Find out more June 2, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is worried about Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’ motives in suddenly trying to rescue DOL, a cash-strapped media group that he has often criticized in the past and only recently accused of disinformation and colluding with business interests.The U-turn came on 18 January, when it was announced that Vassilis Moulopoulos, a close Tsipras ally, was taking over as DOL’s administrator in a bid to save this “historic” media group from bankruptcy and protect the jobs of its hundreds of employees.The appointment of Moulopoulos, a former parliamentary representative of Tsipras’ ruling coalition, Syriza, and a member of the board of the Syriza newspaper, AVGI, has stunned opposition parties and other media outlets, some of which are equally indebted, and is widely viewed as a government attempt to take over the media group.“We are concerned about what seems to be a new attack by the Greek prime minister on media independence and pluralism,” said Pauline Adès-Mével, the head of RSF’s EU-Balkans desk. “We are monitoring the actions of this government, which should be working to ensure media pluralism and freedom and not just to control the media.”The DOL media group’s history is closely intertwined with the history of Greece’s successive governments. Founded by Christos Lambrakis, a Greek media magnate who died in 2009, the group is now controlled by businessman Stavros Psycharis. Its two leading outlets, the newspapers Ta Vima and Ta Nea, have survived thanks to bank loans backed by government officials and government advertising.But Greece’s six-year-old deep economic crisis has exposed the financial fragility of these newspapers, with the government no longer able to extend loans or write off debts now totalling 190 million euros.The DOL group, which includes Radio Vima FM and shares in MEGA TV as well as the newspapers, has nearly 600 employees, who are now in danger of being laid off. They have not been paid for several months but continue to work in the hope that DOL will find a new investor. DOL is now on the verge of bankruptcy while the judical authorities have accused its owner, Psycharis, of tax evasion and money laundering amounting to 45 million euros.DOL’s media outlets have opposed Tsipras ever since he was first elected in 2015. To Vima and Ta Nea openly supported calls for austerity and criticized the Tsipras-led, far-left coalition’s policies. The mutual accusations between Tsipras and Psycharis have often been front-page stories in all the media.The administrator, Vassilis Moulopoulos has said he wants to save DOL because he worked for the group for 20 years in various position including editor-in-chief. Acknowledging that he is not an investor, he said that, in the absence of money, solutions “will be found with the political forces.”Tsipras was widely criticized over a new broadcasting law and the auctioning of TV broadcast licences in September. The media and opposition accused him of amateurism, undermining pluralism and trying to “establish his own oligarchic system.”Greece is ranked 89th out of 180 countries in RSF’s World Press Freedom Index. The Greek police must show journalists can trust it with their protection after one was murdered and another is threatened Help by sharing this information Greece’s new guidelines for policing protests threaten press freedom News GreeceEurope – Central Asia Media independence CorruptionConflicts of interestEconomic pressure GreeceEurope – Central Asia Media independence CorruptionConflicts of interestEconomic pressure News February 2, 2021 Find out more to go further PM Alexis Tsipras / AFP Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU Newslast_img read more

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No bus service planned for opening of new LIT campus

first_imgWhatsApp Senator Maria Byrne with LIT President Professor Vincent Cunnane, and Education Minister Joe McHugh at the LIT Coonagh Campus .Photo: Kieran Ryan BensonTHE National Transport Authority (NTA) has confirmed that it has no plans to provide a bus service to link the city with the Limerick Institute of Technology campus at Coonagh in time for its opening next year.However, a spokesperson revealed that the agency is developing long-term proposals for a “revised network of city bus services in Limerick”, which would include a direct service to LIT Coonagh.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “As this process is at an early stage, it is not possible to indicate when changes may be implemented,” added the spokesperson.Approximately 800 staff and students are expected to travel to the new campus on a daily basis when it opens towards the end of the 2019/2020 academic year.Limerick Fine Gael Senator Maria Byrne said it “makes absolute sense” for a bus service to link the new campus with the city centre and expressed concern that no service will be in place in time for the opening.“I have requested the NTA as part of its review to look at extending a city bus service to service the parts of the Ennis Road and Clonmacken that currently have no city bus service operating in the area.“The improvement of the public transport system in Limerick is a bread and butter issue that I have been pursuing for some time and I hope that the NTA move to introduce these direct bus services as soon as possible,” commented Senator Byrne.Bus Éireann Route 343, which links Limerick with Shannon and Ennis, currently stops at the Coonagh roundabout and operates an hourly service to the area during off peak hours, increasing to every 30 minutes during peak time.Senator Byrne pointed out that this service, as well as another bus route that links Limerick and Shannon Airport, would not be able to cope with an additional 800 passengers.by Kathy [email protected] RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook NewsEducationTransportNo bus service planned for opening of new LIT campusBy Staff Reporter – October 1, 2019 1270 LIT Development & Public Engagement Manager, Seamus Hoyne, is awarded the SEAI Outstanding Contribution to Sustainable Energy Award. Twitter Limerick Post Show | FOLM Project Email Limerick’s Student Radio Station Wired FM Celebrates 25 Years on Air center_img Linkedin Advertisement Print Previous articleReview of A Murder is AnnouncedNext articleStylish effective hair replacement solutions at Catwalk Hair Consultancy Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie International Women’s Day LIT TAGSLimerick City and CountyLimerick Institute of TechnologyLITNewsTransport LIT Launches unique new programme on Responding to Domestic Abuse and Coercive Control Women in the Creative Arts to take centre stage at LIT’s International Women’s Day Flagship Event last_img read more

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Coaching for success

first_img Previous Article Next Article Ascompanies realise the benefits of coaching and mentoring for employees, thepressure is on to convert this to the bottom line. In this fast-growing fieldit will be the role of HR departments to maintain the balance betweenmotivating people and achieving quantifiable resultsFlatter,leaner organisations. Broader, more versatile management roles. Complex careerpaths in place of linear progression and the security of jobs for life. Theseare just some of the characteristics of the modern working world that have ledto the burgeoning popularity of mentoring and coaching. A recent CIPD survey of800 training managers reported that 87 per cent of UK companies now utilise oneor both methods to develop their people. Even more interestingly, over half ofthe respondents deemed them more effective than conventional classroomsolutions.Itis not that traditional training has had its day, but when it comes tofostering creativity and tapping the unique potential of each individual,mentoring and coaching are powerful tools. When properly managed, they canproduce outstanding results.“It’sall about self-awareness,” says executive coach Hetty Einzig of the SportingBodymind Group, whose clients include Barclays Bank, GlaxoWellcome and Jaguar.“You can’t become really successful unless you take time to examine your ownpersonality – how you process information, manage your own emotions, establishrelationships, make decisions, optimise human potential. Those who reach thetop are very emotionally literate. Coaching plays a huge part in releasingthat.”Ifthe individual reaps high rewards, the pay-off for the organisation is equallysignificant. A happy, well-motivated, high-performing workforce cannot fail toimpact on the bottom line, although by exactly how much may be difficult tomeasure. There is also a wealth of evidence to demonstrate that mentoring playsa key role in retaining staff who might otherwise be tempted to jump ship, acrucial asset in a world where talent is in short supply. DavidClutterbuck, senior partner of Clutterbuck Associates and co-founder/ directorof the European Mentoring Service, cites the example of SmithKline Beecham,whose finance department had a staff turnover of 25 per cent last year, yetonly 2 per cent of these were mentored staff. “Five-10 per cent of this may bedue to the fact that people who seek out mentors are more motivated in thefirst place,” he says. “Nevertheless, the figures are impressive.”Sowhat exactly does coaching and mentoring entail and how do you distinguishbetween the two?Thereseem to be almost as many definitions as there are practitioners and the factthat Europe and the US interpret the words slightly differently adds to theconfusion. The issue is further clouded by the growing popularity of executivecoaching, which shares common ground with mentoring.Broadlyspeaking, however, coaching intervention targets high performance andimprovement at work, although it may also have an impact on an individual’sprivate life. It usually lasts for a short period and focuses on specificskills and goals, enabling the participant to think through issues in adifferent way. “Everyonehas huge potential but we tend to block ourselves,” says Sheridan Maguire ofthe School of Coaching, set up by the Industrial Society and Myles Downey. “Agood coach is an excellent listener, asks astute questions and helps thelearner to make their own discoveries.”Mentoring,on the other hand, revolves more around the relationship, which may last foryears, or even a lifetime. Sometimes the focus is on career development and thementor will have extensive experience in the mentee’s professional field. Othermentors act in a more pastoral capacity and may not even share the samediscipline. They serve more as a combination of coach, counsellor, soundingboard and critical friend, providing a safe haven where employees can exploreissues in confidence. Howeveryou define coaching and mentoring, there is universal agreement that withoutthe willing consent of both parties, very little will be achieved.ClaireMontanaro, the founder of Intuition in Business, part of Claire Montanaro &Co, believes participation should be voluntary. “If people are reluctant, youcan try to persuade them by offering them the chance to meet one or two coachesor mentors and see how it goes,” she says. “But if they still don’t want to doit, they will only harbour resentment, which can be positivelycounterproductive.”Onthe opposite side of the coin, what if the coaching or mentoring is soinspiring it serves as a catalyst for high-flying employees to move on?“Inmy experience, this rarely happens and when it does I believe they would havegone anyway,” says Montanaro. “There must have been some underlying source ofdissatisfaction. If it can’t be alleviated, it is probably better they leave.”Moreoften than not, this “underlying source of dissatisfaction” stems from anunhappy relationship with a line manager, or from an organisational culturethat claims to espouse the values of learning, creativity and responsibilitywhile still operating in traditional mode. “It’sall about control,” says Maguire. “Many managers have got where they are byhard graft, acquiring skills, amassing knowledge, playing the system to climbthe ladder. Suddenly they are told they must no longer hold on to information,but give it away – communicate, step back. That is quite difficult for peoplesteeped in the old management culture.”Managerscan also find themselves torn between the conflicting pressures of achievingmeasurable results and giving people space to develop – and maybe makemistakes. “It is possible to do both, but only if the culture is conducive. Ithas to start from the top. Unless coaching and mentoring are espoused from theCEO down, they can be perceived as manipulative tools, something they are doingto US. It is a leadership issue.”“Coachingfor Leadership” is the theme of a book published last year by Dr LaurenceLyons, vice-president of Executive Coaching Network Inc and director ofresearch for the Future Work Forum at Henley Management College. “It alwaysworks best with buy-in from the top,” he concedes. “Itis very difficult to argue with success. The majority of our clients arepromoted very quickly thanks to their increasing business acuity, depth ofthinking and willingness to try new styles, behaviours and approaches – vitalqualities in today’s business world.”Theyare also what HR is all about – or should be. So where does HR fit in?“Itis the most strategic HR activity you could engage in,” says Lyons. “If thesponsor is the CEO and the HR department gets caught out, the scheme may stillwork, but as an external [consultant] you really need to bring them along withyou. That can involve a steep learning curve. “Onthe other hand, there are some very smart HR people around who are themselvesthe advocates and actually start the initiative. They are the ones who take thestrategic view and ask how it will benefit the bottom line. They draw up theframework for the coaching they want and determine what sort of people to bringin. They are very astute and know exactly what they are looking for. They arealso happy to be facilitators, acting in a consultative mode.“Formost of them the content is outside their normal area and they are not experts.But they are good process people. They secure agreement on the profile, putrobust projects into place and ensure there are efficient measurement systems.When they approach it in this well-managed way, they become the stars of thetop management team.”Tofind out how coaching can help HR become a change asset see Global Links andStrategic HR at www.personneltoday.com/featuresFor a list of coaching and mentoring providers go to www.personneltoday.com/directoryEssentialingredients for a successful coaching or mentoring schemeTobe successful there needs to be: –A committed sponsor from senior management and a dedicated scheme coordinator–A clear purpose. The intervention must be relevant to the individual’s needsand contribute to the organisation’s well-being–Rapport. The relationship will founder unless there is enthusiasm andcommitment from both parties–Defined boundaries and guidelines. The terms of the relationship should bemutually agreed and a contract drawn up to establish ground rule–Honesty and openness. Quality feedback is a key element of every coachingrelationship and sometimes the feedback may be hard to digest. This reinforcesthe importance of a strong rapport based on mutual respect and trust–Adequate training. According to David Clutterbuck, co-founder and director ofthe European Mentoring Service, one in three mentoring relationships succeedsthrough serendipity alone. This figure doubles when mentors receive appropriatetraining and rises to nine out of 10 when mentees are trained too–Evaluation. Measures for mentoring can be both hard (absence, promotion) andsoft (increased self-confidence, heightened creativity, happier workingrelationships). As coaching is intended to improve performance there should bea demonstrable impact on the bottom lineCommonPitfalls–Poor planning and preparation–The wrong chemistry between participants–The perception that coaching is remedial rather than a means of raising peopleto greater heights–Confusion between the role of mentor and line manager.CasestudiesThe Industrial SocietyPractice what you preachVoluntarymentoring added value for both staff and their advisers at one organisationWhenthe Industrial Society introduced a mentoring scheme, it was intended for newrecruits and people confronting a change of circumstances, such as a new role.It was largely voluntary and staff were provided with a checklist of 15 itemsand asked to mark those which were important to them. Initiatedby learning consultant Sheila Marston in 1997 and run by the HR team, subjectsranged from careers advice and resources to role models and personal problems.This was then forwarded to HR who identified a possible match. “Thementors were not always senior to the learners, as we call them,” says learningand development director Andrew Forrest. “The most important criterion was thechemistry, and no-one was under any pressure to work with a person they did notlike. After an informal meeting to see how they got along, the formal structurewas introduced and a contract drawn up between the parties.”Supportwas provided through a booklet outlining procedures and half-day trainingsessions for mentors and learners alike. “It may sound rather brief, but theyhad continuing access to HR for support and advice. It is also worthremembering that many of our staff are trainers and already possess somerelevant skills.”Whenthe scheme was reviewed after 15-to-18 months, feedback was very positive. Oneof the most valuable outcomes for the learners was the realisation that theycould control their own career progression. Mentors too had gained from theexperience. “They found that it had helped them to slow down, become morepatient and learn to listen,” he says. “Managers are under so much pressuretoday, it is something they find difficult to do.”Oneinteresting statistic to emerge was that the average mentoring partnership hadtaken up only nine hours over a 12-month period. “As long as the quality ofinteraction was good, this appeared to be adequate,” Forrest  says. Nevertheless,busy diaries could be a hazard and one of the ground rules was that no meetingshould be postponed for more than a week. Anotherwas that line managers should never mentor members of their own team, as thiscan lead to a conflict of interests. Care was also taken to ensure that mentorsand line managers understood their respective roles. “I have known situationswhere huge jealousy flares up and people have stand-up rows. “Wewere very open with both parties. The scheme was introduced very gently andallowed to develop at its own pace, so managers were comfortable with the idea.It was also set in the wider context of all our other methods of developmentand was seen as part of the natural fabric.”Forrest’sonly regret is that when the Industrial Society entered a period of majorreorganisation, many mentors moved on and some of the impetus of the programmewas lost. “You could argue that when you are facing significant upheaval, youneed mentoring more than ever. With hindsight, perhaps we should have done moreto persuade those who left to continue in their mentoring roles while they werehere,” he says. Coaching for successOn 3 Apr 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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You’re never gooner guess which football team most agents support!

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » You’re never gooner guess which football team most agents support! previous nextAgencies & PeopleYou’re never gooner guess which football team most agents support!Reviews website allAgents reveals the club allegiances of the 50,000 agents who have profiles on its site.Nigel Lewis27th February 20180723 Views Football has been a key part of the property industry for many decades and hundreds of agents around the UK support local teams from basic kit sponsorships to major financial support.This includes most recently Purplebricks founder Kenny Bruce, who put £500,000 of his newly-found wealth into a Northern Ireland club, Larne FC.But the clubs which agents support in their greatest numbers has often been a matter of conjecture – and sensitivity – given clients might not like their team of choice, until now.Reviews website allAgents has scanned the profiles of the 50,000 agents on its site and found that the largest group of supporters are Gooners.Premier leagueArsenal fans make up a fifth of the property industry, allAgents claims, matching agents’ fondness of being underdogs. The club, remember have not won the Premier league for over a decade despite the more recent efforts of Arsene Wenger.]The next largest groups of supporters within in industry are Manchester (15%), Tottenham Hotspur (13%), Liverpool (11%) and Chelsea (10%).Agents also like to play football, as well as being supporters. Some 56% list it as their main sporting activity, although bowls is less popular – just half a percent do it.Commenting on his trawl of the agent profiles, allAgents’ Director Martin McKenzie (pictured, left) reveals his Scottish bias (his website, after all, is based north of the border and he’s an ardent Aberdeen fan).“Estate Agents are clearly gluttons for punishment, with 20 per cent of them Arsenal fans – they’d be far better off supporting Aberdeen, who have won four Scottish league titles, seven Scottish Cups, six Scottish League Cups and two European trophies.”Expect more football banter during the run up to the allAgents’ online 2018 ‘People Awards’, the closing date for which is 30th April. More information from [email protected] McKenzie Purplebericks Kenny Bruce AllAgents Arsenal Football February 27, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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Royal Navy’s Ice Patrol Ship Cuts through Ice Floes of Antarctica

first_img Royal Navy’s Ice Patrol Ship Cuts through Ice Floes of Antarctica Back to overview,Home naval-today Royal Navy’s Ice Patrol Ship Cuts through Ice Floes of Antarctica The ship arrived in Antarctica for the first time two weeks ago after her long sail south from Portsmouth and is following up important survey work for shipping in the region with visits to remote research bases locked in the frozen continent.At Deception Island, a stunning water-filled volcanic caldera that is one of just two in the world, Protector sent her smaller survey boat James Caird IV with multibeam echo sounder equipment to survey the area known as ‘Neptune’s Bellows’.It was here that in 2007 the cruise ship MV Nordkapp ran aground and was assisted by the previous ice patrol ship HMS Endurance.Leading Seaman Chris Smith, the boat’s coxswain, said:“Working on the Neptune’s Bellows survey was a highly satisfying job professionally; being part of a team that worked on something this important to the safety of navigation makes all the hard work of being away from my family worthwhile.”A team of four spent two nights at an abandoned Admiralty base, braving gale-force winds with 55-knot (100km/h) gusts to both collect information used for chart-making and satellite-positioning and to record the tidal range.The team took precise GPS measurements on land to make sure the tide gauge was level. The information will allow the UK Hydrographic Office in Taunton to produce accurate charts for ships transiting the area.Lieutenant Graham Blenkinsop, the officer in charge of the survey boat, said:“The opportunity to survey Neptune’s Bellows was fantastic; being able to use the Royal Navy’s most advanced survey motor boat and in such a stunning area.“It was even more satisfying to know that the work we were doing will have a direct impact on the safety of the many cruise ships and research vessels that pass through Neptune’s Bellows and to know that we have done our part to make such an isolated part of the world safer for the ships and their crews.”Later, some of the crew of HMS Protector visited the Spanish Antarctic station Gabriel de Castilla, meeting base commander Major Antonio Casals Abraham and his team, who greeted them with a British Union Flag flying next to the Spanish flag on the beach.After a tour, Lieutenant Commander Andy Storey, Operations Officer on Protector, presented a ship’s crest to the base commander and invited him to dinner with Captain Peter Sparkes, Protector’s Commanding Officer, and the Commanding Officer of the Spanish Antarctic patrol ship SPS Las Palmas.It was in the Lemaire Channel that HMS Protector first broke the ice to mark her role as the Royal Navy’s ice patrol ship. It took four hours to travel through the passage, with the ice increasing steadily, and seals and penguins on the ice floes.Protector then moved on to Port Lockroy, a historic British base manned by the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust. She brought vital stock, loaded in Portsmouth, to resupply the base, as well as its Post Office and small shop.The ship’s work boat Terra Nova delivered the supplies and then transferred building waste back to Protector to follow Antarctic Treaty and environmental protocols.The ship’s company visited the museum at Port Lockroy where living conditions from the 1940s and 1950s are preserved with handwritten notes and other memorabilia. Lieutenant Simon Lockley discovered that his namesake Sub-Lieutenant Lockley was one of the first base commanders there 60 years ago.Meanwhile, for three days, Protector deployed her cold weather experts, the Royal Marines, to complete their cold weather training.Colour Sergeant Mick Cowe, a Mountain Leader, said:“The environment in Antarctica offers a unique challenge. We are here to provide the appropriate level of expertise to the ship’s company and these few days ashore have helped to consolidate our perishable skill set.”HMS Protector has since recovered scientists from the British Antarctic Survey who were dropped off to investigate global warming. Her patrol continues.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , February 08, 2012; Image: royalnavy View post tag: Ice View post tag: Navy’s View post tag: Antarctica View post tag: cuts HMS Protector, the Royal Navy’s ice patrol ship, has cut through the ice floes of Antarctica for the first time. View post tag: through View post tag: Royal View post tag: Patrol February 8, 2012 View post tag: ship View post tag: Floes Share this articlelast_img read more

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CAPPOCK, EILEEN

first_imgFuneral mass was held at Sts. Peter and Paul R.C. Church, Hoboken on Feb. 2 for Eileen Cappock, 84. She died Jan. 27. Eileen was born in Hoboken, where she lived all of her life. She was a legal secretary before ultimately founding her Realty Company in Hoboken. She was also a member of the Board of Realtors. Eileen was predeceased by her parents Michael and Agnes (nee Hauck) Cappock and her brother Robert Cappock. She is survived by cousins Noreen Hauck and Raymond Cappock.Services arranged by the Earl F. Bosworth Funeral Home, Hoboken.last_img

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Target: Climate change

first_imgExperts from the worlds of science, government, economics, business, and history will gather in Sanders Theatre on April 13 at 4 p.m. for a wide-ranging panel discussion on how society in general and universities in particular can best confront the perils posed by climate change, Harvard President Drew Faust announced today.The discussion, to be introduced by Faust and moderated by Charlie Rose of CBS and PBS, will bring together President Barack Obama’s principal science adviser, the co-chair of a major international climate change group, and five leading scholars prominent in seeking solutions to climate change.“As a scientific consensus has firmly established, climate change presents one of the world’s most urgent and demanding challenges. All of us share an interest and responsibility in confronting that reality and pursuing effective solutions,” said Faust, who on March 17 delivered an address on climate change at Tsinghua University in Beijing.“I am pleased we will have the benefit of such a distinguished group of panelists to elevate attention to the need for action and to spur us all to focus even more intently on how society and universities, in particular, can rise to the challenge,” Faust added. “We have an extraordinary range of efforts already underway across Harvard, and the magnitude and complexity of the problem demand that we do even more.”Panelists are expected to include:Joseph Aldy, assistant professor of public policy, Harvard Kennedy School; former special assistant to the president for energy and environment, the White House.Christopher Field, co-chair, Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; founding director, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science; Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Stanford University; member, Harvard University Board of Overseers; Harvard ’75.Rebecca Henderson. McArthur University Professor, Harvard University; co-director, Business and Environment Initiative, Harvard Business School.John Holdren, assistant to the president for science and technology, the White House; co-chair, President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology; former Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy, Harvard Kennedy School; former professor of environmental science and public policy, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University.Richard Newell, Gendell Professor of Energy and Environmental Economics, Duke University; director, Duke University Energy Initiative; former administrator, U.S. Energy Information Administration; former senior economist for energy and environment, President’s Council of Economic Advisers; Harvard Ph.D. ’97.Naomi Oreskes, professor of the history of science and director of graduate studies, Department of the History of Science, Harvard University; co-author of “Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming.”Daniel Schrag, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, professor of environmental science and engineering, and director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment, Harvard University.In recent years, the University has substantially broadened and deepened its research and educational programs focused on climate change and on energy and the environment. Most recently, the University announced the first recipients of grants from the President’s Climate Change Solutions Fund, intended to catalyze a new generation of efforts to accelerate the transition to renewable sources of energy.Last year, Harvard created a secondary field in energy and environment for undergraduates and launched the Center for Green Buildings and Cities at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Across Harvard’s 13 Schools there are 239 faculty conducting research related to climate, energy, and the environment, and 243 courses are offered to students covering the topics of energy, the environment, or sustainability.Showcasing such efforts in scholarship and thinking related to climate change, the Harvard University Center for the Environment will host a series of events during the week of April 6–10.In addition to research and education, Harvard continues strong progress toward meeting its aggressive goal for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and building a healthier, more sustainable campus.Last year, Harvard Management Company joined the Carbon Disclosure Project’s climate change program, intended to drive environmental disclosure and performance of publicly listed companies, while also becoming the first university endowment to adopt the United Nations-supported Principles for Responsible Investment.Please click here to request a ticket for the event.last_img read more

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Sister interprets the ‘good’

first_imgSister Joan Chittister, a Benedictine sister and author of 45 books, discussed the common good during the annual Fr. Bernie Clarke Lecture on Catholic Social Tradition on Monday night in the Hesburgh Library auditorium. “Tonight I want to spend a little time sorting out … the whole concept of ‘the common good,’” she said. Chittister said celebrating the 50th anniversary of the encyclical “Pacem en Terris” brings people to the very heart of what it means not only to be a Christian or a Catholic, but also to be a citizen of the United States.”In every single presidential election cycle, we enter as a people into the centrifuge of one of the oldest debates and at the same time one of the most pressing contemporary questions in the life of this country,” she said. “That question is what exactly as a people are we about? Is such a think as the common good even possible in a world such as ours?” Chittister said in “Pacem in Terris”, Pope John XIII does not talk about peace in terms of war or weapons of mass destruction, but in terms of the common good. “In 176 paragraphs of that encyclical, he talks 48 times about the common good,” she said. “Without the common good, there will never be peace and certainly no justice.” Chittister said the issue of the common good even divided Alexis de Tocqueville and James Madison on the question of what the common good is and how to obtain it. “[The common good] riveted the Founding Fathers 200 years ago and it clearly confuses this session of Congress,” she said. “It has plagued political philosophers and economists across centuries and it continues to do so to this very day.” The common good is the holy grail of politics, Chittister said. “The common good is a vision of public virtue, which engages the individual citizen, energizes the government, shapes the public system and points the public direction and all it’s policies, all it’s institutions and all it’s legislative intents,” Chittister said. “The common good is the answer to the question, what, that we all want for this country … what is it that we really want for this country and how do we go about getting it.” Chittister said now the discourse in the U.S. is more inclined to talk about the general good instead of the common good. “We talk about the public good, meaning natural gifts that benefit us all equally, like air, water and good order if of course we have the good fortune to find air that is pure, water that is clean and land that is toxin free, resources that are sufficient to afford anywhere,” she said. There is no doubt the common good is an endangered species, Chittister said. Chittister said the world is changing through globalization with more diversity present in religion, nations and neighborhoods. What once divided people – language, geography – no longer do so, she said. “‘Pacem in Terris’ gets clearer everyday,” she said. “The fact that one is a citizen of a particular state does not detract from anyway from his of her membership in the human family as a whole or from their citizenship in the world community.” Contact Anna Boarini at [email protected]last_img read more

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Shamrock Series offers volunteer opportunities

first_imgFans will travel to Dallas this weekend to cheer for the Irish in this year’s Shamrock Series game against Arizona State, and a group of Notre Dame alumni and friends plan to make a lasting impact on a Texas charity while they are in town. Alumni Association President Erin O’Connor French and spiritual director Angie Appleby Purcell collaborated with Catholic Charities USA to bring volunteers to the Assessment Center of Tarrant County in Fort Worth, Texas, Purcell said. Participants will renovate the building and support the children served at the Center by painting walls, building picnic tables and offering monetary donations.  Purcell said the Alumni Association organizes volunteer events annually to coincide with Shamrock Series games and Notre Dame’s bowl games to show generosity to the extended community beyond campus.  “Other folks, other teams and other people may be gathering for the social aspect, which of course we are too, but for Notre Dame it is very important for us to give back to the local community, particularly to those who are needy,” Purcell said. When the Notre Dame community travels together, they hope to leave the place in a better state than when they arrived, French said.  “This is a way for us to make a long-lasting impact … and make it worth-while for them to host Notre Dame and to leave a positive impact on those communities,” French said. The beneficiary of this project, the Assessment Center of Tarrant County, serves as a home for children under the age of 17 who have been taken from their parents for child welfare concerns, French said.  “Its primary goal is to not only house these children in a safe environment, but it is a very holistic approach to their education, to their psychological well-being, to their health, to their safety, with the goal being for these children to be reunited with their families,” Purcell said. In line with this holistic approach, while the volunteers work on the building, the children will receive tours of Dallas Stadium, and many will attend the game as well, she said. “With children whose lives are really in turmoil and have faced far more obstacles and challenges in life than they should, we are hoping for an afternoon or weekend in which they can just be kids again and not have any worries other than just to have fun,” Purcell said. French said the actual physical effort of the volunteers would go towards improving the comfort and atmosphere of the children’s temporary home.  “What we’re trying to do is make it less clinical, less sterile and more home-like for these children,” she said. “It’s a tumultuous time for them, and a lot of them are quite young … so we’re going to paint and make it more home-like. We hope to do some planting work out in the outside of the building [and] we will work on the recess play areas for them depending on the number of volunteers.” Purcell said members of the Notre Dame community who cannot travel to Texas could still participate by donating $25 to sponsor a “welcome kit” for an incoming child.  “Children who are coming to this center usually are coming with little or not much with them, so the welcome kits that the center offers children as they come is all that the children have to start with,” she said. “That includes … all the things that a child both literally needs but also some support and something fun that they may not have coming with them.”  “It’s kind of a two-tiered approach for how to engage our alumni community … both physical labor-wise but also in terms of donating for the welcome kit.” The Alumni Association chose the Assessment Center because of its affiliation with Catholic Charities USA, with whom Notre Dame shares a connection as a partner and collaborator, Purcell said.  “We just thought it would be a great opportunity not only to serve the children who are themselves worthy of our time and energy, but also because we want to strengthen and unify our partnership as two pretty important Catholic institutions to help the common good,” Purcell said.  Any students traveling to the game who want to volunteer may sign up in the Worthington Renaissance Hotel, from which the Alumni Association will provide transportation, or show up at the Assessment Center of Tarrant County where the volunteering will take place from 2 to 5 p.m. Friday.last_img read more

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Smart About Solar’ series announced for March

first_imgWILLISTON, Vermont . . . February 24, 2011 . . . AllEarth Renewables, Inc.,With energy prices on the rise, Vermont Yankee’s license expiring in 2012, and recent instability in the Middle East, Williston-based AllEarth Renewables is hosting an energy series in five local communities this March.The ‘Smart About Solar’ series, which will focus how Vermonters can protect themselves against the rising cost of energy, will be held in Chittenden County and northern Addison County communities throughout the month of March.The events begin at 7 pm and will be held in Charlotte, Shelburne, Hinesburg, Vergennes and Starksboro.  They are free, open to the public, and include refreshments.The solar series events are:Charlotte: Wednesday, March 2nd at 7:00 p.m. – Charlotte Central School Library, 408 Hinesburg Road, Charlotte with presenter David Blittersdorf, president/CEO of AllEarth RenewablesShelburne: Tuesday, March 15th at 7:00 p.m. – Shelburne Town Offices, 5420 Shelburne Road, ShelburneHinesburg: Tuesday, March 22nd at 7:00 p.m. – Hinesburg Town Offices, 10632 VT Route 116, HinesburgVergennes: Monday, March 28th at 7:00 p.m. – Bixby Library, 258 Main Street, VergennesStarksboro: Wednesday, March 30th at 7:00 p.m. – Robinson Elementary School, 41 Parsonage Road Starksborolast_img read more

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