African Swine Fever Continues to Spread

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News African Swine Fever Continues to Spread Facebook Twitter By Andy Eubank – Jul 13, 2020 SHARE African Swine Fever Continues to Spread SHARE Facebook Twitter Audio Playerhttps://www.hoosieragtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/ASF-spreading.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.COVID-19 has grabbed the world’s attention and many of the headlines for months, but prior to all of this there were important concerns in world agriculture news, and one of them is not going away, just taking a back seat in the news. African Swine Fever has continued to expand its territory around the globe. It moved into Greece earlier in the year. National Pork Board senior vice president of science and technology Dr. David Pyburn says they may have it under control since it is only on one farm.“But, we also saw a couple of months ago it moved into India as well, so another country that has now been declared positive for the virus,” he said. “In the countries of the Philippines, China, Vietnam, those Asian countries, we continue to see it expanding its territory within those countries and continues to affect more herds in those countries. They do not have it under control. And, even in that Eastern European area and in Poland as well, we’ve seen continued expansion of the area that the virus infects pigs.”ASF is not present in the U.S. but it is now in over 50 countries. The Pork Checkoff remains focused on prevention.“We’ve had research in the works, especially looking at how it moves on people, how it moves in product and especially also how it can potentially move in feedstuffs,” Pyburn explained. “We continue to talk with Customs and Border Protection here, because that’s out first line of defense, and making sure that thy are stopping any risk materials and keeping any risk material from coming into the country so that we don’t bring the virus into the country.”For more information, producers can contact the Pork Checkoff Service Center https://www.pork.org/ or call 800-456-PORK. Previous articleUpdate on Indiana Wheat Harvest and Double Crop Soybeans on the HAT Monday PodcastNext articleSoil Moisture Decreases, Silking on Pace With Five-Year Average Andy Eubanklast_img read more

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Cold Weather Means Rental Market Bargains for Investors

first_img HomeUnion rental investments Rentals Single-Family Rentals 2018-01-09 David Wharton Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago For investors looking to find bargains in the single-family rental (SFR) market, winter is here … and that’s a good thing. According to a study by HomeUnion, an online real estate investment and management firm, the off-peak winter period can be one of the best times of year to acquire single-family rental homes. HomeUnion reports that investors paid 6.6 percent less per square foot during the winter months of 2018 than they did during summer 2017, when the buying market is in full swing.Steve Hovland, Director of Research for HomeUnion, says, “For the second year in a row, our study found that the wintertime is the best season to acquire rentals. Median home prices drop substantially during the colder months, while rent losses remain marginal for landlords. On average, investors can acquire higher-yielding properties in cold-weather markets like Omaha, Nebraska; Chicago, Illinois; and Hartford, Connecticut.HomeUnion ranked the 40 best metro areas to buy rental property during the wintertime, with Omaha, Nebraska topping the list. HomeUnion found the average wintertime price for Omaha to be $78,100, down 32.1 percent from the summertime average of $115,000. Here are the list’s top 10 entries, along with the price decrease between summer and winter months.Omaha, Nebraska: -32.1 percentChicago, Illinois: -26.0 percentHartford, Connecticut: -25.5 percentColumbus, Ohio: -25.1 percentSeattle, Washington: -24.7 percentWashington, D.C.: -24.3 percentNew York, New York: -23.8 percentCincinnati, Ohio: -22.4 percentGrand Rapids, Michigan: -21.4 percentMinneapolis, Minnesota: -20.1 percentYou can see the rest of HomeUnion’s rankings by clicking here.Investors interested in the single-family rental market should take note of Five Star’s 2018 Single-Family Rental Summit, set to unfold March 19-21, 2018, at the Renaissance Nashville Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee. The three-day Summit will feature top subject matter experts and skilled SFR practitioners leading discussion panels and training sessions related to property acquisition and management, financing, strategies for small, mid-cap, and large investors, and new developments related to technology and professional services. You can find more information by clicking here. Sign up for DS News Daily Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Cold Weather Means Rental Market Bargains for Investors The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Journal, News, Secondary Market Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Mortgage Delinquencies Begin to Recover from Hurricane Season Next: First-Time Homebuyers Could Face Increased Default Risks in 2018 Share Save January 9, 2018 1,982 Views  Print This Post Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Tagged with: HomeUnion rental investments Rentals Single-Family Rentals Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Cold Weather Means Rental Market Bargains for Investors About Author: David Wharton Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

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Coronavirus live updates: 18 family members test positive after holiday party

first_imgnarvikk/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR and SCHUMAKER, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now infected more than 95.6 million people worldwide and killed over 2 million of them, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Last night I was alerted by the @NHSCOVID19app to self isolate so I’ll be staying at home & not leaving at all until Sunday. We all have a part to play in getting this virus under control. pic.twitter.com/MaN1EI7UyY— Matt Hancock (@MattHancock) January 19, 2021 Here’s how the news is developing Tuesday. All times Eastern:Jan 19, 12:02 pmPanel investigating global pandemic response says the worst is ‘yet to come’An independent panel backed by the World Health Organization and tasked with investigating the global pandemic response warned that “the worst of the pandemic and its impact are yet to come” in a new report released late Monday.The panel put some blame on China — where the outbreak originated — saying in January 2020, Chinese authorities could have applied public health measures “more forcefully.”The panel said the World Health Organization as well as national and local authorities could have issued more timely and stronger warnings on the potential for human-to-human transmission.The panel also said that by the end of January 2020, all countries with a likely case should have implemented public health containment measures, but claimed only a minority of countries took full advantage of the information available.The panel said its observations should be regarded as provisional because the investigations aren’t complete and the pandemic is continuing to evolve.Jan 19, 11:48 amNew record number of cases among kidsThe American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association found over 211,000 new COVID-19 cases among kids last week — the highest number since the pandemic began, according to a newly released report.About 2.5 million children have tested positive since the pandemic started. From Dec. 31 to Jan. 14, there was an 18% jump in cases among children.Severe illness due to COVID-19 remains rare among kids. Between 0.2% and 2.8% of all child COVID-19 cases have resulted in hospitalization, and children account for 0.00% to 0.17% of all COVID-19 deaths.But the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association warn that there’s an urgent need to collect more data on longer-term impacts of the pandemic on children, including ways the virus may harm their long-term physical health as well as their emotional and mental health.Jan 19, 10:35 amSeychelles reopens to all tourists who have been vaccinatedSeychelles Tourism Minister Sylvestre Radegonde has announced that the island nation is reopening its doors to all tourists, as long as they have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19.In addition to providing proof that they have received both doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, visitors must also produce a negative COVID-19 test taken within the 72 hours prior to their arrival in order to be exempt from quarantining, Radegonde said at a press conference last week.From mid-March, those who wish to visit Seychelles will only need to provide a negative COVID-19 test result as the country hopes to have 70% of its population vaccinated by that point, Radegonde said.Sybille Cardon, chairperson of the Seychelles Hospitality and Tourism Association, told the state-owned Seychelles News Agency that the new measures to reopen the country will not help the tourism industry immediately.“It is definitely not something that will help us immediately because, as you know, in Europe they want to vaccinate everyone with at least the first dose of the vaccine,” Cardon said Monday. “The second dose will not be administrated in three weeks, as previously said. It will be done in about 2 to 3 months as they want to give the first dose to the majority of people. This means that the decision taken will not have a direct impact.”Seychelles, an Indian Ocean archipelago located off the coast of East Africa with a population of just under 100,000, has reported 746 confirmed cases of COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic, including two deaths, according to the latest data from the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Jan 19, 10:07 amUK health secretary self-isolating after coming into ‘close contact’ with someone who tested positiveBritish Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced Tuesday that he will be self-isolating at home for the rest of the week.Hancock said he was pinged by the U.K. National Health Service’s COVID-19 app on Monday night, alerting him that he had been in “close contact” with someone who has tested positive.“So that means I’ll be self-isolating at home, not leaving the house at all until Sunday,” Hancock said in a video statement posted on Twitter. “This self-isolation is perhaps the most important part of all the social distancing, because I know from the app that I’ve been in close contact with someone who has tested positive and this is how we break the chains of transmission.”“So you must follow these rules, like I’m going to,” he continued. “I’ve got to work from home for the next six days and together, by doing this, by following this and all the other panoply of rules that we’ve had to put in place, we can get through this is and beat this virus.”Hancock recently came under fire by British tabloids after he was seen in a crowded park in north London on Saturday. The current lockdown restrictions in England bars people from leaving their homes except for a very limited set of exemptions, including to shop for basic necessities, outdoor exercise and to go to work if they cannot do so from home. A photograph of Hancock surfaced after British Boris Johnson had released a video urging people to “think twice” before leaving their homes this weekend.center_img Jan 19, 9:48 amNorway says no evidence that Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine increased risk of patients’ deathsNorway’s national public health institute said Tuesday that there is currently no correlation between receiving the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and an increased risk of death among 23 people who died after getting the shot.The deceased were “severely frail patients” who died within six days after vaccination in the Scandinavian country, and the incidents “do not imply a casual relationship between COVID-19 vaccination and death,” according to Dr. Sara Viksmoen Watle, chief physician at the Norwegian Institute for Public Health.“When we vaccinate the eldest and sickest who often have several underlying conditions we expect high mortality in this population. Hence, we also expect deaths following vaccination,” Watle said in a statement Tuesday. “We do not yet know if these deaths are due to the vaccine or other causes, but we cannot exclude that common side effects may have led to a more severe course for some patients.”The Norwegian Medicines Agency and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health are investigating the deaths.“So far, there are no statistical analyses that indicate that coronavirus vaccination has had an increased risk of death among those vaccinated,” Watle said, after noting that the fatal incidents will be examined “in relation to the expected number of deaths among the nursing home population.”“In order to be able to interpret this information, it is important to see the full picture,” she added. “Nursing home residents are at very high risk of a severe disease course or dying from COVID-19, and have therefore been prioritised for vaccination. A large proportion of those who live in nursing homes have severe underlying conditions or are in the last stages of life. Life expectancy in nursing homes is relatively short and on average, more than 300 people die in Norwegian nursing homes every week.”Jan 19, 8:05 amAmericans can expect travel restrictions to tighten ‘if anything,’ incoming CDC director saysU.S. President-elect Joe Biden’s pick to lead the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said she will “hit the ground running” and suggested there might be more travel restrictions in store.“We need to reset the stage here. We need to make sure the country, the people understand that this pandemic is now going to be addressed with science, with trust, with transparency, with communication of exactly where we are to the American people,” Dr. Rochelle Walensky told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos in an interview Tuesday on Good Morning America.Walensky, the chief of infectious diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, will be sworn in Wednesday as director of the CDC — an appointment that does not require Senate confirmation.“I will be sworn in tomorrow, but the work has been happening since I was named,” Walensky said, “and we’ve been working really hard to make sure we can come in and hit the ground running and make sure that we can get this country back to health.”Walensky said the incoming administration’s plan to vaccinate 100 million people against COVID-19 within the first 100 days of Biden’s presidency is “really ambitious but doable.” The key is making sure there are enough people on the ground to administer the vaccines, understanding the supply and how many doses are going to which states, and making vaccines accessible to all people.“All of that plan is underpinned with equity,” Walensky said. “We need to make sure that we’re equally and equitably getting the vaccine across this country.”In one of his last orders, outgoing President Donald Trump announced Monday that he was rescinding entry bans imposed because of the coronavirus pandemic on most visitors from Brazil and much of Europe effective Jan. 26. However, Biden’s spokesperson Jen Psaki said the incoming administration won’t be lifting the bans.Walensky agreed with the move to reject Trump’s order and said there may be more travel restrictions introduced.“If you look at the fatalities of 400,000 that we’re likely to hit today, if you look at our cases across this country, I don’t think now is the time to encourage people to get on international fights, to encourage people to mobilize,” Walensky said. “I think now is the time to really buckle down, double down our efforts. And so I don’t expect that we’ll be lifting travel restrictions and, if anything, I think we can expect that they might tighten, especially in the context of variants that we’re hearing about.”Jan 19, 7:24 amIsrael sees record rise in cases despite mass vaccinationIsrael confirmed 10,222 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, its highest daily tally since the pandemic began, suggesting the country’s mass vaccination campaign hasn’t kicked in yet.The record figure translates to a nationwide positivity rate in COVID-19 tests of 10.2% However, one promising sign is that the number of critically ill patients hospitalized with COVID-19 across Israel has remained steady over the past few days.Israel’s cumulative totals now stand at 562,167 confirmed cases and 4,049 deaths from the disease, according to the latest data from the Israeli Ministry of Health.Official figures show 25% of Israel’s general population — nearly 2.2 million people — have received the first of two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, while 5% — more than 420,000 — have received their second dose.The Israeli government is expected to meet Tuesday afternoon to determine whether to extend the current lockdown, which has been in place since Jan. 8 and is slated to end Jan. 21.Jan 19, 7:17 am1 in 8 people in England have had COVID-19, data suggestsAn estimated one in eight people in England have already been infected with the novel coronavirus, according to antibody data from the U.K. Office for National Statistic’s COVID-19 Infection Survey.The survey estimates that 12.1% of the population in England would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in December 2020, suggesting they had the infection in the past.“The estimate is weighted to be representative of the overall population and suggests that an average of 5.4 million people aged 16 years and over in England would have tested positive for antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 during this time,” the report said. “This equates to 1 in 8 people aged 16 years and over.”That estimate was one in 10 people in Wales, one in 13 people in Northern Ireland and one in 11 people in Scotland, according to the survey.Meanwhile, a regional analysis of antibody data for England found that the highest positivity was seen in Yorkshire and The Humber, followed by London and the North West, according to the survey.The survey, which was launched in the United Kingdom in mid-April of last year, measured several factors: how many people test positive for COVID-19 at a given point in time, regardless of whether they report experiencing symptoms; the average number of new infections per week over the course of the study; and the number of people who test positive for antibodies, to indicate how many people are ever likely to have had the infection.The U.K. — an island nation of 66 million people made up of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland — has confirmed more than 3.4 million cases of COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic, including more than 89,000 deaths. There were 37,535 new cases and 599 additional fatalities from the disease confirmed in the last 24 hours, according to the latest data published on the U.K. government’s website.Jan 19, 5:50 amEighteen family members test positive after holiday party in PennsylvaniaOne family’s holiday gathering in Pennsylvania has turned out to be a superspreading event, according to a report by Philadelphia ABC station WPVI-TV.Darlene Reynolds, 55, said she woke up with a scratchy throat on Dec. 26, the day before relatives from as far as Canada were planning to come over for a holiday party at her home in the Milmont Park section of Ridley Township.“I had no fever because I kept checking it,” Reynolds told WPVI. “I said, ‘I’ll keep a distance since I have a tiny little cough.’”Soon after the party, people started getting sick.“We were sick, but we didn’t know we had COVID. We could’ve had the flu, but it was scary,” Reynolds told WPVI. “We got tested and we tested positive.”In total, 18 family members ranging in age from 1 to 62 contracted COVID-19. Reynolds said both her husband and their son were hospitalized.Jan 19, 5:25 am100 doses of Moderna vaccine batch flagged by California officials administered at mass vaccination eventJust hours after California’s top epidemiologist recommended pausing the use of COVID-19 vaccines from Moderna’s lot 041L20A due to “possible allergic reactions” that are under investigation, Mendocino County officials discovered that the batch in question was used at a mass vaccination event in San Diego.“The county has reviewed the lot numbers administered through our mass vaccination clinics as well as the inventory stored in our freezer. Upon further review, we are confirming that 100 doses of Mendocino County Public Health’s Moderna vaccine associated with the batch the state is concerned with were used at a vaccination event at the Redwood Empire Fairgrounds on January 7th,” Mendocino County vaccine coordinator Adrienne Thompson said in a statement Monday night.According to Thompson, all 100 doses were administered at the event and comprised a separate order from the state. No adverse reactions occurred.“County staff will be contacting all 100 individuals that received a vaccine with this lot number to alert them of the recall,” Thompson said. “No other side effects have been noted from use of this vaccine.”Mendocino County’s public health officer, Dr. Andrew Coren, said events such as this are not unexpected because these are new vaccines, and it should not deter the public from getting vaccinated.“This isolated event has not increased the percentage of vaccine reactions, which continue to be about one person in 100,000,” Coren said in a statement Monday night. “Getting vaccinated continues to be the best way for all of us to help move beyond this virus and return to a normal way of life.”Jan 19, 4:17 amUS reports over 137,000 new casesThere were 137,885 new cases of COVID-19 confirmed in the United States on Monday, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.It’s the lowest daily case count that the country has seen since Dec. 25. Monday’s tally is also far less than the country’s all-time high of 302,506 newly confirmed infections on Jan. 2, Johns Hopkins data shows.An additional 1,382 fatalities from COVID-19 were registered nationwide on Monday, down from a peak of 4,462 new deaths on Jan. 12, according to Johns Hopkins data.COVID-19 data may be skewed due to possible lags in reporting over the holidays followed by a potentially very large backlog.A total of 24,078,773 people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 399,003 have died, according to Johns Hopkins data. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.Much of the country was under lockdown by the end of March as the first wave of the pandemic hit. By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up over the summer.The numbers lingered around 40,000 to 50,000 from mid-August through early October before surging again to record levels, crossing 100,000 for the first time on Nov. 4, then reaching 200,000 on Nov. 27 before topping 300,000 on Jan. 2.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Sea Isle City Man Arrested for Explosive Materials, LSD

first_imgA police car blocked the street on Saturday at 36th Street and Landis Avenue while authorities investigated the discovery of chemicals and other explosive components inside a local residence. By Donald WittkowskiSea Isle City police have arrested a local man on charges of possessing chemicals and components used for making explosives.Steven Lamb, 29, also was charged with weapons and drug offenses after LSD strips and a CO2-powered handgun were found in a Sea Isle residence at around 9:45 a.m. Saturday, police said in a press release Wednesday.Police did not specify in the release what types of explosives-making materials were discovered. Lamb was charged with two counts of possession of chemicals and components “for the purpose of manufacturing explosive devices.”Sea Isle police were assisted by the Cape May County Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive Weapons Unit, the Atlantic City Police Bomb Squad, the FBI and the Cape May County Prosecutor’s Office.Police Chief Thomas D’Intino said in the release that police responded quickly and professionally and that “at no time were Sea Isle residents in any danger.”D’Intino could not be reached for comment Wednesday. The police department declined to release other details of Lamb’s arrest, saying that the case remains under investigation. Lamb’s home address was not disclosed.According to the press release, police responded to a medical incident at a local residence and saw some “suspicious materials” while they were there. The release did not disclose the address of the residence or elaborate on what type of medical incident was involved. However, a SEAISLENEWS.com reporter was at the scene Saturday when police responded to the residence at 36th Street and Landis Avenue.Emergency vehicles also were at the scene Saturday when police responded at 36th Street and Landis Avenue.Lamb was transported to an unspecified hospital after he was taken into custody. Police would not say whether he was later taken to jail.Police did not release any information on Lamb’s background or occupation.A profile for a Steve Lamb, of Sea Isle City, on the professional networking website LinkedIn says he has been the owner and operator of a company called Altered Elevations since July 2014. Altered Elevations is involved in “making, repairing and designing props for fire-performance art,” his profile says. The employment history in Lamb’s LinkedIn profile also says he has been working as a Wawa associate in Ocean City since July 2016.The profile also says he has been working in event security since September 2014 for Argus Event Staffing LLC, which provides security at sporting and music events in the Denver area.Lamb studied business administration and management at the University of West Virginia from 2006 to 2008 and is a 2006 graduate of Cinnaminson High School in Cinnaminson, N.J., according to his LinkedIn profile.SEAISLENEWS.com and OCNJDAILY.com will continue to report on this developing story as more details become available.last_img read more

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Consultation outcome: NICE recommendations: charging and appeal panels

first_imgThe report describes the response the government received and how it analysed the results. It also describes the changes the government proposes to make to the proposed policy.,The government is consulting on proposed changes to legislation to allow the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to charge companies for making technology appraisal and highly specialised technology recommendations relating to their products.We are also consulting on changes to the regulations to allow NICE to recruit appeal panel members from the healthcare system in the UKlast_img

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Ginsters and Cooplands roll out vegan bakes

first_imgSource: GinstersGinsters and Cooplands have rolled out new vegan savoury pastries – a Mexican-inspired empanada and cheese & vegetable bake.Ginsters has partnered with Finnish Gold & Green Foods to create a vegan empanada containing pulled oats, a plant-based ingredient which it said is new to UK savoury pastry aisles.The Vegan Mexican Chilli Empanada comprises marinated pulled oats – a meat alternative made from a high protein mix of oats, peas and faba beans – piquante pepper and ancho chillies in a smoky Mexican style sauce. The light pastry is finished with a smoked paprika topping.Pulled oats are free from additives and Ginsters has tipped the ingredient to be big in the UK, having already taken ‘Finland and Sweden by storm’.The empanadas are available in Morrisons stores nationwide for an rsp of £1.50 (two-pack) or £2 (three-pack).“The debut of pulled oats into UK savoury pastry, alongside contemporary flavours in this range, will expand our core snacking and vegan offering – two increasingly popular trends that will continue to boom,” said Kiran Hemsworth, managing director at Ginsters.The empanadas contain less than 100 calories and tap into the preferences of pre-family shoppers who under index in the savoury pastry snack category, the firm added. Source: CooplandsCooplands, meanwhile, has teamed up with Violife to launch a Cheeze & Vegetable Bake to its menu.It’s available now in all 160 of the bakery’s stores for an rsp of £1.50. The bake is made up of mature cheddar flavour, Violife’s dairy-free cheese alternative, vegetables, a hint of chilli and dairy-free creamy sauce, encased in a flaky pastry.It has been created to meet the increasing demand in the north east and Yorkshire region for vegan products that don’t compromise on taste, said Cooplands.“We are excited to partner with Violife to create a new plant-based cheese bake using their great tasting cheese replacement product. For people who are either vegan or just looking to eat less meat in their diet or trying to do their bit for the environment, it is a tasty option,” said Belinda Youngs, CEO at Cooplands.last_img read more

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Foo Fighters Invite ‘Kiss Guy’ On Stage For A Jam In Austin [Watch]

first_imgDave Grohl invited an audience member dressed like a member of KISS to join Foo Fighters on stage during last night’s show at the Austin360 Amphitheater in Austin, TX. The man, who neglected to share his name with the band, was affectionately dubbed “Kiss Guy” by Grohl before diving into a jammed out rendition of “Monkey Wrench”. Kiss Guy didn’t have any trouble living up to the moment, making for a very entertaining impromptu sit-in. He even brought his own pick to the show, so maybe he knew he was destined for a legendary night. Judging by the crowd reaction—they began chanting his “name” after the nearly 7-minute tune ended—he earned the high praise Grohl threw his way.Foo Fighters feat. Kiss Guy – “Monkey Wrench”[Video: vanebud]Yesterday’s show also featured some other treats, including covers of Queen‘s “Under Pressure” and Alice Cooper‘s “Under My Wheels”, and a medley that included parts of Queen’s “Another One Bites The Dust”, Rush‘s “YYZ”, John Lennon‘s “Imagine”, Van Halen‘s “Jump”, and The Ramones‘ “Blitzkrieg Bop”. It also marked the second time in the past year that Foo Fighters have invited a fan from the audience to join them on stage.[H/T – JamBase]last_img read more

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COPD, asthma now can be studied outside the body

first_img Human-gut-on-a-chip model offers hope for IBD sufferers Related Development of new therapeutics for chronic lung diseases have been hindered by the inability to study them in vitro. To address this challenge, Wyss Institute researchers used their organ-on-a-chip technology to produce a microfluidic “human-lung-small-airway-on-a-chip.” Credit: Wyss Institute“Inspired by our past work using the organ-on-a-chip approach to model the lung alveolus, we created a new microfluidic model of the lung small airway that recapitulates critical features of asthma and COPD with unprecedented fidelity and detail. Now, with this microengineered human lung small airway, we can study lung inflammatory diseases over several weeks in chips lined by cells from both normal donors and diseased patients to gain better insight into disease mechanisms, as well as screen for new therapeutics,” said Donald Ingber, the senior author on the work, who leads the multidisciplinary team of Wyss scientists that has been at the forefront of organ-on-a-chip technology. He is also the Wyss Institute’s founding director, the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital, and professor of bioengineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBm9MbwvN60″ rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/PBm9MbwvN60/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> A research team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University leveraged its organ-on-a-chip technology to develop a model of the human small airway in which lung inflammatory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the third leading cause of mortality worldwide, can be studied outside the human body.As reported online Monday in Nature Methods, the platform allows researchers to gain new insights into the disease mechanisms, identify novel biomarkers, and test new drug candidates.COPD and asthma are inflammatory reactions in the lung that can be dramatically exacerbated by viral and bacterial infections, as well as smoking. It is known that many of the associated disease processes occur in the conducting airway sections of the lung that shuttle air to and from the alveoli, or air sacs. However, much less is known about how inflammation induces distinct pathological processes such as the recruitment of circulating white blood cells and the buildup of mucus, which compromise the lungs of these patients, or how clinical exacerbations are triggered. Modeling COPD and asthma Wyss Institute replicates gut’s microenvironment in the lab, allowing researchers new access Demand for such opportunities is especially high since small-airway inflammation cannot be adequately studied in human patients or animal models and, to date, there are no effective therapies that can stop or reverse the complex and widespread inflammation-driven processes.“To closely mimic the complex 3-D cellular architecture of actual human small airways, we designed a microfluidic device that contains a fully matured human small-airway epithelium with different specialized cell types exposed to air in one of its two parallel microchannels. The second channel is lined by a human vascular endothelium in which we flow medium containing white blood cells and nutrients so that the living microsystem can be maintained over weeks. We then modeled inflammatory asthma and COPD conditions by adding an asthma-inducing immune factor or by setting up the system with lung epithelial cells obtained from patients with COPD,” said Remi Villenave, a former postdoctoral fellow in Ingber’s group and the co-first author on the publication. In both cases, the team not only was able to observe highly disease- and cell-type-specific changes but could also exacerbate them with agents simulating viral or bacterial infection.“This new organ-on-a-chip technology gives us a window on molecular-scale activities in the context of living human lung tissue. It also provides us with a handle to dissect contributions of specific cell types and biochemical factors to small-airway diseases, including how circulating immune cells are recruited to inflammation sites and how compromised cilia function contributes to abnormal mucus clearance in the lungs of diseased patients,” said Kambez Hajipouran Benam, a postdoctoral fellow working with Ingber who is the other co-first author of the study.Finally, the team provided proof-of-principle that the synthetic small-airway-on-a-chip can be utilized as a discovery platform for disease-specific drugs and biomarkers. In collaboration with two industrial partners — Pfizer and Merck Research Laboratories, which also helped fund the project — and with support from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Wyss researchers showed that two drugs targeting different key molecular components of inflammatory pathways can potently suppress pathological processes in asthma and COPD-tailored small airway chips. The Wyss scientists also identified a macrophage-recruiting factor whose levels are raised by a viral mimic in the COPD model and which can be further investigated as a potential specific biomarker for viral exacerbations of COPD.“This novel ability to build small-airway chips with cells from individual patients with diseases like COPD positions us and others now to investigate the effects of genetic variability, specific immune cell populations, pharmaceutical candidates, and even pandemic viruses in an entirely new and more personalized way, one that will hopefully increase the likelihood of success of future therapeutics,” said Ingber.last_img read more

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The Real Paleo Diet: Less Hunter, More Gatherer

first_imgWhen it comes to what we eat, Americans have long chosen the path of least resistance. It’s been that way ever since the advent of fast food chains, microwave ovens, and the highly processed, pre-packaged convenience foods found on modern grocery store shelves, and the trend has had disastrous effects on our nation’s overall health and well-being. With more than one-third of our citizens overweight, we lead the world in obesity levels, and we shell out more money to treat preventable ailments — diabetes and heart disease just to name a few — than any other nation on earth. But our troubling health epidemic hasn’t gone unnoticed or untreated. Public awareness about our collective weight issue is at an all-time high, and the trendy diets are more prevalent than ever.One of the most popular is the “Paleo” or “Cave Man Diet.” Based on the premise that our bodies are biologically adapted to consume only that which appeared on the menus of our cave-dwelling, prehistoric ancestors, the Paleo plan promotes lean meat consumption and avoiding any modern convenience food that wasn’t hunted or gathered by nomads living from 2.6 million years ago to 10,000 B.C. Paleo advocates claim that only by abandoning agriculturally based diets, which are “out of sync with human biology,” can we begin to live fuller, healthier, longer lives. Many even go so far as to suggest the elimination of legumes and other veggies like tomatoes and eggplant. The number one tenet in the paleo diet’s detailed mission statement is an increase in daily protein intake. According to the diet’s creator and founder of the modern paleo movement, Dr. Loren Cordain, augmented meat consumption is afforded such high priority because that is exactly the way that our ancient Paleolithic ancestors would have had it. “In our laboratories we looked at 229 hunter gatherer societies,” Cordain said in a recent television interview, “and data from our findings suggests that the average meat intake was about 55% of calories.”“Paleo allows me to remain healthy and happy,” Cordain says, “and I’m truly gratified when I hear anecdotal evidence about the way in which it has changed people’s lives for the better.” It is Cordain’s finding that 55% of the Paleolithic diet was based in meat consumption that certain qualified individuals take issue with when critiquing the Paleo diet. One such individual is Harvard evolutionary biologist Daniel Lieberman, who argues that gathering provided far more calories than hunting for our paleo ancestors. “There is a lot of good information to be gleaned from the dietary habits of Paleolithic era hominids,” Lieberman told me. “But it’s important that we critically evaluate these habits and apply only that which makes good, sound biological sense. Just because Paleolithic people may have eaten something doesn’t necessarily mean it is a healthy option for the modern human.”He went on to explain: “There is no one paleo diet. These people existed for millions of years and inhabited many different corners of the globe. Trying to pinpoint one homogenous Paleolithic diet is neither feasible nor rooted in evolutionary study.” According to Lieberman, early humans used persistence hunting—literally chasing animals to death—as a way to supplement their staple foods like foraged tubers, insects and other wild plants, but meat was more of a hard-earned luxury than an everyday menu item like many modern Paleo diet advocates often claim. Most Paleolithic humans couldn’t possibly ensure that their daily diet was made up of 55% lean meats because, on the rare occasion that they actually ate meat, they literally had to chase it to death. Even when successful, they were likely forced to share the kill with other members of a growing tribe.Bipedal hominids who lived during this time frame are believed to have eaten anything and everything they could—including insects, scavenged entrails, and dozens of varieties of fruits, nuts, seeds, and tubers. Rather than emphasizing meat, a true Paleo diet should probably place more emphasis on the seasonality and wide variety of natural, unprocessed food sources, mainly from plants. This isn’t to say that we modern humans can’t derive valuable lessons from the lifestyles and culinary habits of our ancient ancestors. For instance, cutting as many processed foods from your diet as you possibly can is always a good thing, and implementing locally sourced, native plant foods will almost certainly benefit your health.But you should probably stop short of banishing legumes and tomatoes while freely consuming heaping portions of free-range bacon and porterhouse steaks.last_img read more

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You can get a Thanksgiving basket by making a phone call

first_imgHouseholds that order a basket will receive a confirmation number from 211. That number will be needed to pick up the basket. To sign up for a Thanksgiving basket, you will need to call the United Way of Broome County’s 211 phone number sometime between Sept. 8 to Oct. 16 during its business hours between 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Families that order a basket will receive a letter detailing the time and date they can pick their food up about one to two weeks before Thanksgiving. Families should expect to pick their basket up between Nov. 20 and 23. VESTAL (WBNG) — Catholic Charities of Broome County will give out free Thanksgiving baskets this year for families in need. There will not be in-person sign-ups due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The baskets will contain food for a family holiday meal. Baskets will be limited to one per household in need, Catholic Charities says. The charity also asks callers to have information on hand for every person in the household before making the call to 211.last_img read more

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