Stabenow Calls for CFTC Rules to be Finalized

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Stabenow Calls for CFTC Rules to be Finalized An archived webcast of the hearing can be accessed on the Senate Agriculture Committee’s website at https://ag.senate.gov. SHARE By Gary Truitt – Jul 17, 2012 Facebook Twitter Senator Debbie Stabenow, Chairwoman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture Nutrition and Forestry, today pressed the nation’s chief financial regulators to implement the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. At an oversight hearing, Chairwoman Stabenow said the recent failures of firms like Peregrine Financial Group and MF Global, as well as trading losses at JP Morgan and the ongoing LIBOR scandal, all underscore the need to implement the bill, which was passed by Congress more than two years ago.   “Many derivatives are still trading in the dark and some financial institutions are still taking risks that threaten our economy,” Chairwoman Stabenow said. “We need these markets to have integrity and market participants need certainty so they can plan for compliance and make business decisions for the coming months and years. Businesses, farmers and ranchers need to know these markets are safe for trading and hedging risk. And American families need to know their jobs aren’t going to disappear – again – because of excessive risk-taking by a reckless few.” Gary Gensler, Chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, and Robert Cook, Director of the Division of Trading and Market at the Securities and Exchange Commission, both testified at hearing. Other witnesses included Robert Pickel, CEO, International Swaps and Derivatives Association, Washington, DC; Larry Thompson, Managing Director and General Counsel, The Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation (DTCC), New York, NY; Dennis Kelleher, President and CEO, Better Markets, Washington, DC; and, Thomas Erickson, on behalf of the Commodity Markets Council, VP of Government Affairs, Bunge North America, St. Louis, MO.center_img Stabenow Calls for CFTC Rules to be Finalized Chairwoman Stabenow continued, “If anyone is wondering why we need these rules, all you need to do is turn on the news,” Chairwoman Stabenow said. “There’s the LIBOR rate-setting scandal, the Eurozone crisis, the demise of Peregrine Financial Group, significant trading losses at JP Morgan, and the MF Global bankruptcy.” SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous articleMarkets Soar and Crop Conditions WorsenNext articleGlyphosate-Resistant ‘Superweeds’ May Be Less Susceptible To Diseases Gary Truittlast_img read more

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Soybean Carryout Key in USDA Friday Report

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Soybean Carryout Key in USDA Friday Report SHARE Previous articleDonnelly Presses China on Biotech TraitsNext articleWarren County Corn and Bean Fields Look Great Andy Eubank SHARE Facebook Twitter Soybean Carryout Key in USDA Friday Report Facebook Twitter June report previewTom FritzThe market will be keeping one eye on the weather and the other on the supply and demand report that will be released by the USDA Friday. Tom Fritz with EFG in Chicago says the soybean carryout numbers will be a key.“You look at projected carry outs on soybeans, they’re much tighter than corn, whereas businesses being dialed in for our new crop beans, we cannot afford to lose any bushels. So, I think that is the biggest propelling issue in the soybean market.”Fritz says there are some in the trade who feel the situation in soybeans may be even tighter than current USDA numbers indicate.“I’ve got some folks trying to allude to the idea that old crop bean carry-out might be a hundred million bushels too high right now. Now that would mean we would have to see one tremendous rush of demand towards the end of the marketing season, but I am also hearing indications that Brazil is sold out of beans right now. So, I think that in turn is one reason why we have seen the last couple of days these USDA announcements. I am hearing the new crop announcements are where we transition from old crop to new crop.”As for market expectation for today’s report, “If we get the numbers that the traders expecting I think it’s going to viewed as ho hum, we already knew that. What’s the weather forecast?” By Andy Eubank – Jun 9, 2016 last_img read more

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White House Suspends Discussions on Ending KORUS

first_img White House Suspends Discussions on Ending KORUS Home Indiana Agriculture News White House Suspends Discussions on Ending KORUS Facebook Twitter White House officials have temporarily halted discussions on the possibility of terminating a free trade agreement with South Korea. On Wednesday night, a senior White House official said that the deal could still be terminated, but there were no immediate plans to do so. President Trump had been talking with his senior advisers about the possibility of withdrawing from the free trade agreement because of concerns that it is tilted in favor of South Korea. However, Trump also needs help from South Korea as he tries to end a crisis regarding North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs after a sixth North Korean missile test this week. There are Trump advisers urging the president to stick with the deal and avoid straining relations with a key ally in Asia.The U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement, known as KORUS, was negotiated by Trump’s predecessor, Barack Obama. KORUS has been a frequent target of Trump’s, noting that America runs a $28 billion trade deficit with South Korea.Source: NAFB News Service Facebook Twitter SHARE SHARE By NAFB News Service – Sep 7, 2017 Previous articleVietnam to Resume Importing U.S. DDGsNext articleU.S. Cropland Value Holds Steady NAFB News Servicelast_img read more

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House Passes U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement Implementing Legislation

first_img Facebook Twitter SHARE By NAFB News Service – Dec 19, 2019 Home Indiana Agriculture News House Passes U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement Implementing Legislation Agriculture groups are calling on the Senate to “finish the job” and pass the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement following approval in the House of Representatives Thursday. The U.S. House overwhelmingly passed implementing legislation for USMCA, sending the trade agreement to the Senate.The vote came following a delay of more than a year to make changes and reach an agreement between House Democrats and the Trump administration. Representative Richard Neal, who led the House efforts to modify the agreement, says the transformed trade deal approved Thursday “closes important loopholes and enables the United States to ensure our trading partners live up to their commitments.”Senate leader Mitch McConnell last week stated the Senate would not consider approving the agreement until after the Senate completes an impeachment trial in January. Members of the National Corn Growers Association were in Washington this week, urging the Senate to quickly consider and pass the trade agreement in the new year.“I’ve long said that support for USMCA crosses political parties, the bipartisan passage of the agreement today is proof of that,”  said Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. “I am pleased the House finally brought this agreement to a vote and encourage quick passage in the Senate. President Trump delivered on his promise to replace NAFTA and USMCA is a huge success for America’s farmers and ranchers. This agreement will unleash the bounty of America’s agricultural harvest to two of our largest trading partners in the world and it is critical to the success of rural America.” House Passes U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement Implementing Legislation SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous articleHouse, Senate, Pass Ag Spending PackageNext articleContinued Dry, Lower Grain Markets and Recapping the Indy Farm Expo on the Friday Morning Edition NAFB News Servicelast_img read more

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African Swine Fever Continues to Spread

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News African Swine Fever Continues to Spread Facebook Twitter By Andy Eubank – Jul 13, 2020 SHARE African Swine Fever Continues to Spread SHARE Facebook Twitter Audio Playerhttps://www.hoosieragtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/ASF-spreading.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.COVID-19 has grabbed the world’s attention and many of the headlines for months, but prior to all of this there were important concerns in world agriculture news, and one of them is not going away, just taking a back seat in the news. African Swine Fever has continued to expand its territory around the globe. It moved into Greece earlier in the year. National Pork Board senior vice president of science and technology Dr. David Pyburn says they may have it under control since it is only on one farm.“But, we also saw a couple of months ago it moved into India as well, so another country that has now been declared positive for the virus,” he said. “In the countries of the Philippines, China, Vietnam, those Asian countries, we continue to see it expanding its territory within those countries and continues to affect more herds in those countries. They do not have it under control. And, even in that Eastern European area and in Poland as well, we’ve seen continued expansion of the area that the virus infects pigs.”ASF is not present in the U.S. but it is now in over 50 countries. The Pork Checkoff remains focused on prevention.“We’ve had research in the works, especially looking at how it moves on people, how it moves in product and especially also how it can potentially move in feedstuffs,” Pyburn explained. “We continue to talk with Customs and Border Protection here, because that’s out first line of defense, and making sure that thy are stopping any risk materials and keeping any risk material from coming into the country so that we don’t bring the virus into the country.”For more information, producers can contact the Pork Checkoff Service Center https://www.pork.org/ or call 800-456-PORK. Previous articleUpdate on Indiana Wheat Harvest and Double Crop Soybeans on the HAT Monday PodcastNext articleSoil Moisture Decreases, Silking on Pace With Five-Year Average Andy Eubanklast_img read more

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Kimbell Art Museum honors Hispanic Heritage Month

first_imgJake Foote Jake Footehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/jake-foote/ Hispanics are one of the largest demographics in the Fort Worth area, yet The Kimbell is the only museum in the cultural district offering events specifically for Hispanic Heritage Month.Volunteer docents have performed the tours each Sunday afternoon of Hispanic Heritage Month, which spans from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. The tours are meant to be interactive so that docents and patrons discuss the cultural importance of the works together.“The Kimbell wants to pay homage to all cultures, but we are uniquely poised in the cultural district to offer this opportunity to Spanish speaking patrons,” said Connie Hachette Barganier, the education manager at the Kimbell.As the education manager, Hachette Barganier has used the Kimbell’s connections in the community to pair with Fort Worth Independent School District and promote the programs amongst Spanish speaking students.In addition, the museum hopes to target family groups with a number of events that include both parents and children in the learning process.“We are all proud of our heritage,” said Hachette Barganier. “We truly enjoy helping Hispanic families show their children the beautiful art that was developed in their native language.” Jake Footehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/jake-foote/ Twitter Facebook Facebook ReddIt Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Linkedin Twitter Fit Worth Corporate Challenge encourages fitness in the community Kickball tournament raises money to kick out cancercenter_img Jake Footehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/jake-foote/ Previous articleStudents explore new library with excitementNext articleW.P. McLean 6th Grade Center updates health curriculum Jake Foote RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR GOP voters in Tarrant County set record for first-day voter turnout UIL recognizing cheerleading as a sport, adhering to stricter concussion guidelines printThe Kimbell Art Museum is offering tours in Spanish in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month for one more week.The Kimbell launched the program in an attempt to get the Hispanic community more involved in the events and opportunities that the museum provides.The tours last around 45 minutes and focus on popular Mesoamerican and Spanish pieces from the museum’s permanent collection. Based upon request, each docent can also tailor the tours to focus on any other artwork in the permanent collection.The Hispanic Heritage Tours are a part of the museum’s education program, which aims to enrich the community through various programs and classes.“The Kimbell has an outstanding, dedicated Education Department, with offerings for all ages,” said Museum Director Eric M. Lee. “I am delighted to report that since the opening of the Renzo Piano Pavilion and its state-of-the-art education facilities, attendance in Education Department programs has increased by 130 percent.”The museum is using these tours during Hispanic Heritage Month as an opportunity to reach out to one of the largest demographics in Fort Worth and increase the popularity of educational programs.Breakdown of Fort Worth population by race | Create your own infographics Jake Footehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/jake-foote/ + posts ReddIt Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Linkedinlast_img read more

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Annual parade set to light up downtown Fort Worth

first_imgReddIt Twitter Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/ Facebook Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday CRES negotiates move to interdisciplinary unit amid student resistance ReddIt Linkedin Facebook Elizabeth Campbell is executive editor of TCU 360 and a senior journalism and political science double major. When not in the newsroom, she’s thinking about the news while probably watching TCU football or being a history nerd. Send her a tip if you have a story to share! Alumna joins ‘Survivor’ reality show in quest for a million dollars WATCH: Former Chief of Staff for Obama talks Trump administration, Democrats, liberal arts education Elizabeth Campbell center_img Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/ Twitter Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/ Previous articleVolleyball finds success on their home courtNext articleWide receiver Josh Doctson done for regular season Elizabeth Campbell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/ + posts Breakdown: Cambridge Analytica, information warfare Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store printXTO Energy will hold its annual Parade of Lights in downtown Fort Worth Nov. 22, 2015 with the theme, “Let the Season Begin!”Activities in Sundance Square Plaza will begin at 2 p.m with “exciting, live holiday entertainment,” according to the press release for the event. At 5:30 p.m. cowboy Santas will march up and down the parade route to accept toy donations for children in need.The parade itself will begin at 6 p.m. at the intersection of Belknap Street and Throckmorton Street. The parade will end on Weatherford Street, taking approximately 40 minutes in total. The parade will conclude with Santa himself going down the parade route and the lighting of the Christmas tree in Sundance Square.Spectators will also see marching bands, antique cars and decorated horse-drawn carriages along the 1.58-mile parade route, according to the parade’s Public Relations and Social Media Manager Claire Armstrong.The parade is free, but there is reserved seating available on the website with prices ranging from $9.50 to $35.This year viewers can vote via text on which float they think should win the award of best parade entry. They can use their mobile device to text the word “parade” followed by the entry number to 99000 to cast their vote. Full details and terms and conditions are available online.Shuttles will be provided by T’s expanded bus service that runs from Farrington Field, where there is free parking, to downtown. The buses will run from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. and round trip shuttle service requires exact fare of $3.50 per person. For those driving to the parade, Houston Street and Commerce Street will close for pre-parade entertainment at 4:30 p.m..Traditionally, the parade has been the week after Thanksgiving, however, this year it was moved up a weekend. Armstrong said this change happened after surveying street seat purchases, parade participants and sponsors, downtown shops and restaurants, and the dates of parades in other cities.“Now with more retailers in place, having a successful Black Friday is important to the continued success of retailing and attracting more shops,” Armstong said. “We need more big nights in downtown and moving the parade to Sunday adds one to the calendar. We also believe this is the best date to improve parade access, parking availability and convenience for everyone involved. Also, because students have the following week off for Thanksgiving break, we are able to maintain the event’s family-friendly nature.”The Grand Marshals for this year’s parade are Jacinto “Cinto” Ramos, Jr., board president representing District 1, Patricia Linares, Ph.D., former superintendent and Kent Scribner, Ph.D., the new superintendent of FWISD.This event first began in 1983 with 25 units. This year the parade has over 100 units featuring community groups and supporters. In recent years the parade has attracted a crowd of over 200,000, according to the parade website.The recent inclement weather has had no effect on parade preparations and Armstrong said she doesn’t think it will affect attendance this year either.“Come rain or shine, we are still preparing for North Texas families to come out and enjoy the parade,” Armstrong said. “Although, Santa really doesn’t like it when his coat gets wet, so fingers crossed for no rain!”last_img read more

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Criminal justice graduates first students from master’s program

first_imgReddIt The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years Students debut performances of drag personas as part of unique new course Tori Knox Linkedin Tori Knoxhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tori-knox/ Tori Knoxhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tori-knox/ Facebook printAn inaugural class of 14 students received a Master of Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology from TCU’s online criminal justice master’s program.Johnny Nhan, director of the online master’s program, said members of the program typically already have real-world experience.“The nature of the people that we were after, people who wanted to have a master’s in criminal justice, typically they’re police officers, or they’re already working in the field,” Nhan said.The graduates include police officers, individuals from federal agencies and students coming straight out of undergraduate programs, Nhan said.Graduate Joe Herrera said he wants to use his master’s degree and background in law enforcement to teach at the college level. Herrera said he currently teaches a new program — Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security — at Waxahachie High School.Jordanne Morrow graduated from TCU with a Bachelor’s of Science in Criminal Justice in 2014 and immediately joined the master’s program.Morrow said she wants to work in white-collar crime investigations. She previously worked for the Bank of Oklahoma as an anti-money laundering investigator and fraud analyst.“I saw a lot while working at [Bank of Oklahoma] that just having a bachelor’s degree in the area that I want to go into isn’t enough,” Morrow said. “I needed more to be a better prospect for jobs.”After graduating, Morrow said she will intern with Disney in the fall before returning to Bank of Oklahoma’s fraud department.Graduate Sophia Freeman said she wants to use her master’s degree to return to the criminal justice field.Freeman has a Bachelor’s of Science in Criminal Justice from the University of Louisiana at Monroe and said after moving to Fort Worth and exploring her options, she decided to advance her education at TCU.Freeman said for a long time she wanted to become a police officer, but after becoming a mother, she decided to let that dream go.“I have played with the idea of going to teach freshman criminal justice as a part-time instructor,” Freeman said. “I am still fascinated with the knowledge that comes with knowing and applying law and reason to everyday society.” Teenage pregnancy rates remain high in Tarrant County Tori Knoxhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tori-knox/ Twitter Twittercenter_img Gang evolution does not match common perceptions Tori Knoxhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tori-knox/ Facebook + posts Spring 2016 commencement. Linkedin National Night Out increases community safety Previous articleIMAGE: Inspiring MedicineNext articleParting words Tori Knox RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Fort Worth’s cat population remains steady ReddIt Condensed semester, lost week to snowstorm adding to some students stress during finals weeklast_img read more

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Robert Carr Chapel holds Election Day service

first_imgWorld Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Twitter Cole Polley ReddIt Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ Linkedin + posts SGA supports addition of new minor Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ Facebook TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history SGA holds Outreach Day to interact with students TAGSphotos center_img Cole is a Sophomore Journalism major from Llano, Texas. He’s an avid Seinfeld watcher and he is passionate about the San Antonio Spurs, listening to Drake & chicken wings. Hit him up on Twitter @CPolley12! printOn Tuesday morning, TCU’s Robert Carr Chapel held a church service focused on the presidential election.Hosted by TCU Brite Divinity School, the service was led by guest pastor Scott Mayer, the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.Service attendees gather in Robert Carr Chapel (Cole Polley/TCU360)With election night looming, a crowd of about 50 gathered to listen to Mayer’s message, and the election was certainly in the forefront of the discussion.Mayer said he realized the importance of preaching on the TCU campus on this crucial day for America.“I think to be preaching in a divinity school that is committed to social justice on Election Day definitely had special significance to me,” Mayer said.Mayer also added that many parts of the service were pertinent to the election, even the hymns that were sung.“A couple of our hymns were very appropriate for the day, as well as our prayers,” Mayer said. “I didn’t ignore the reality of what is going on today at all…I think this election process has pretty much magnified what we need to deal with in the world going forward.”Attendees smiled and exchanged greetings at the conclusion of the service as they filed out of the chapel.“It’s nice to be able to come here and have that fellowship on such a nerve-wracking day,” attendee James Thomas said. “Tensions are high but this adds a solid element to the day for me.”In addition to the fellowship, Thomas also said he enjoyed the fact that he could hear a message that he could relate to the ongoing political situation on Election Day.“It’s important to keep in mind how our faith relates to the election,” Thomas said. “Otherwise it’s easy to get lost in everything that’s going on, so it was cool to be able to hear something relatable today.” Students squeezed at Market Square, renovations looming Linkedin SGA brings ‘It’s On Us’ to campus in joint Big 12 initiative Twitter ReddIt Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Previous articleeSPOT questionnaire to undergo changesNext articleVoting out of this world Cole Polley RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Service attendees gather in Robert Carr Chapel (Cole Polley, TCU360) Facebook Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/last_img read more

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TCU cancels homecoming and family weekend amid COVID-19 worries

first_imgReddIt Twitter TCU News Now 3/24/2021 Linkedin Alexis Kinghttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexis-king/ Alexis Kinghttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexis-king/ Facebook Mada: How one app is helping you pick what to wear A view of the Campus Commons. (Photo courtesy of Connor Allen.) Facebook Twitter + posts Previous articleInstructors, students given distance learning optionNext articleCourt won’t allow graduate students to join discrimination suit Alexis King RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Alexis Kinghttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexis-king/ printAs the number of COVID-19 cases at TCU and across Texas continues to climb, the university announced Thursday it was forgoing Family Weekend and Homecoming plans and pushing back the next phase of its reopening. TCU FrogFest in 2015. (File photo)Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Kathy Cavins-Tull announced the changes in an email to faculty and staff.As of Wednesday, June 24, TCU reported 70 active COVID-19 cases – 61 involved students and were listed as off-campus exposure, meaning they hadn’t been on campus within two days of exhibiting symptoms and testing positive. “It is disappointing to have two fun weekends canceled but this is a smart decision to keep students and families safe,” said junior nursing major Izzy Gregoire.Ella Gunn, a junior communication studies major, said she hopes the cancellation of these two weekends will show people “how important it is to wear face coverings to be able to do the bare minimum of just going to class next semester.”The announcement came hours after Tarrant County’s countywide executive order requiring face coverings, effective Friday, June 26, until Aug. 3.“This is a proactive move to reduce travel to the campus and limit large indoor gatherings in an effort to decrease risk to the campus,” said Cavins-Tull.In addition, TCU made the decision to push back Phase 3 of its Return to Campus for Employees’ plan to July 13.  Face coverings are a requirement on the TCU campus until further notice, Cavins-Tull said. At Wednesday’s Faculty Senate meeting, Provost Teresa Dahlberg said students would be required to wear masks at all times on campus. In order to adjust to CDC recommendations and guidance from local officials, Cavins-Tull wrote that it is “critical that we all do our part to stop the spread of COVID-19.” COVID-19 cases continue to rise across Texas. As of today, there are a total of 4,389 people hospitalized with COVID-19; up from 2,793 cases last week. Tarrant County has seen a substantial community spread of COVID-19 with 10,363 positive cases along with 517 new cases.  Minority students talk about election results ReddIt Alexis King is a journalism major with a minor in digital culture/data analytics from Plano, Texas. Alexis hopes to to work in entertainment news after she graduates. Alexis enjoys traveling and spending time with her friends & family. TCU News Now 2/24/2021 Alexis Kinghttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexis-king/ Alexis King Linkedin World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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