Executive Council moves toward proposed draft budget

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Executive Council, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Kenneth Knapp says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Knoxville, TN Executive Council October 2014, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (1) By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 24, 2014 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group November 16, 2014 at 11:16 am While developing budgets, you might want to keep in mind that some of us make directed contributions to the church in order to keep our contributions out of the hands of the partisan lobbyists in the Office of Government Relations. If I wanted to contribute to a partisan political cause I would send the money directly to politicians who best represent my opinions. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags [Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council opened its four-day meeting here considering its proposed draft 2016-2018 budget as well as reviewing in committees resolutions that are due for council action on the last meeting day.The Rev. Susan Snook, a member of council’s Joint Standing Committee on Finances for Mission (FFM), gave her colleagues an update on the committee’s work on the budget thus far. Because that work is not complete, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori advised council members and observers not to report the details of the work Snook presented. The committee will return to council on Oct. 27 with a preliminary draft.After council considers that version, it soon will be released to the church for comment. In addition some FFM members will stay at the Maritime Institute in Linthicum Heights, Maryland, after that meeting to discuss the document with the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F) during its Oct. 27-29 meeting.Then FFM will revise the budget based on comments from PB&F and the wider church and have a final draft budget ready for the full council’s consideration during its Jan. 9-11, 2015 meeting. According to the joint rules of General Convention (joint rule II.10.c.ii), council must give its draft budget to PB&F no less than four months before the start of General Convention (essentially by February of convention year).PB&F is due to meet next from Feb. 23-25, 2015, to begin work on that draft budget. PB&F uses the draft budget and any legislation passed by or being considered by General Convention to create a final budget proposal. That budget must be presented to a joint session of the Houses of Bishops and Deputies no later than the third day before convention’s scheduled adjournment. The two houses then debate and vote on the budget separately and the budget needs the approval of both houses.In a related matter, Treasurer Kurt Barnes updated the council on the state of the current 2013-2015 triennial budget. He reported that the 2014 budget year-to-date through September is generally in line with the revised version council had previously approved.General Convention approves the triennial budget, and council often revises the three annual budgets, based on changes in income and expenses.Council will be asked to approve a 2015 budget that has a deficit but, Barnes said, the three-year budget overall, which must at least be balanced, will show $4 million in income above what is needed to cover expenses. He attributed that excess income to $1.5 million in unbudgeted income from rental of space at the Church Center in New York. An additional $2.9 million comes from an increased draw on endowment income to support the work of the church’s development office. Some increased expenses shaved money off that $4.4 million additional income, Barnes said.He noted that while diocesan income has increased from what was budgeted, the increase is attributable to better performance of diocesan investments leading to greater diocesan income and a generally improving economy.“We have not seen any increase of dioceses stepping up with higher [percentage] contributions,” he said.The Episcopal Church’s three-year budget is funded primarily by pledges from the church’s dioceses and regional mission areas. Each year’s annual giving in the three-year budget is based on a diocese’s income two years earlier, minus $120,000. Diocesan commitments for 2013 and 2014, based on the budget’s request of a 19 percent contribution, are here.Presiding bishop says church must learn to share it resources in new waysPresiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori focused her opening remarks to council on how the church must change the way it educates its leaders and how it might foster financial autonomy for every diocese and other jurisdiction in the church.“We’re not called to build a church that leaves poor and struggling relatives either shamed or incapacitated by their poverty,” she said. “We are called to build societies of abundance where resources are directed where needed, and no one lives in want …We should be challenging all Episcopalians to see the abundance we enjoy as gifts to be shared. When those gifts are shared, we know that it brings joy and flourishing to all members of the body. It looks like abundant life.”Jefferts Schori also complimented the entire council for its “growth in capacity in this triennium.”“We are engaging the mission and ministry of this Church in larger and more strategic ways than we have in recent years,” she said. “I continue to believe that the primary mission of this body is those larger and strategic questions, and I firmly hope the Convention will help us to clarify that role.”The complete text of the presiding bishop’s remarks is here.House of Deputies president outlines General Convention changesIn her opening remarks to council, the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, House of Deputies president, outlined a series of changes for to the 2015 meeting of General Convention that she said are aimed at “make[ing] the legislative process one that can best help us discern our mission and ministry.”Those changes include a new slate of legislative committees that are more closely aligned with the framework of the Five Marks of Mission, Jennings and Jefferts Schori said in a July letter to bishops and deputies. The new committees are here.Jennings said she plans to appoint House of Deputies legislative committees by the end of this year and instruct committee chairs to begin work before General Convention. The current Rules of Order permit that early start and Jennings told council she hopes that it “will make it possible for us to consider legislation much more efficiently once we arrive at General Convention.”Another change at convention is the scheduling of four joint sessions of the House of Bishops and the House of Deputies, including:* June 24, the day before the first legislative day, an afternoon session during which the nominees for presiding bishop will be presented,* June 26, joint session to receive officially the nominations from the Joint Nominating Committee for the Election of the 27th Presiding Bishop and to receive nominations that may have come through the petition process. (The House of Bishops elects the presiding bishop on June 27, after which the House of Deputies is asked to vote to confirm or not confirm the bishops’ choice.) That session will also include a conversation on church structure, according to Jennings,* June 30, joint session for a conversation on mission,* July 1, for the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget & Finance to present its proposed budget for the 2016-2018 triennium (both houses will debate the budget and must concur on the same budget for it to be approved), and* July 3 (final legislative day), a special Eucharist for convention to welcome the presiding bishop-elect. Jennings said that although the new presiding bishop will also be seated at the Washington National Cathedral later in the year, “we intend for the service at General Convention to be the primary celebration so that we can all participate in an event with only modest additional costs.”The complete text of Jennings’ remarks is here and an Oct. 22 letter she wrote to deputies explaining the General Convention changes is here.The rest of the meeting agendaCouncil will spend all of Oct. 25 in committee meetings. After Eucharist on Oct. 26, committee sessions will continue until mid-afternoon when the whole council gathers for another session on the 2016-2018 proposed draft budget. On Oct. 27, council meets as a whole to consider various reports and act on proposed resolutions from its five committees. That day will include a closed session for the council to hear a report from its subcommittee considering options for use of the Church Center at 815 Second Ave. in New York.The Oct. 24-27 meeting is taking place at the Maritime Institute Conference Center.Some council members are tweeting from the meeting using #ExCoun.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). The council is composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by the nine provincial synods for six-year terms – plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Program Budget & Finance Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Executive Council moves toward proposed draft budget Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments are closed. Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more

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Christians across the world join together to pray ‘Thy Kingdom…

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted May 3, 2018 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA May 3, 2018 at 5:56 pm Much meaningless ado about nothing, I should say, given the extent to which the Anglican/Episcopal churches have recently ignored many of the things which for hundreds of years have given real depth to the religious experience. At best an attention diverter. Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. Director of Music Morristown, NJ May 4, 2018 at 10:30 pm I believe in prayer. Perhaps, “Thy Kingdom Come” prayer will open the eyes of those in authority and us to see where changes are needed and which issues to address for the good of all. [Anglican Communion News Service] Christians around the world are pledging to mark the time between Ascension Day on May 10 and Pentecost on May 20 with a single prayer: Thy Kingdom Come. Next week marks the third observance of Thy Kingdom Come, an invitation to Anglicans and Christians across the globe to join in prayer. For the second year, Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry has joined in the initiative, providing several prayer resources as well. The initiative grew out of a call that the archbishops of Canterbury and York made to the Church of England in 2016 to pray that God’s Kingdom would come. Since then, it has grown into an international movement with Christians praying that people everywhere would come to know Jesus Christ.Read the entire article here. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Comments (2) Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Christians across the world join together to pray ‘Thy Kingdom Come’ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Anglican Communion Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Joe Prasad says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Tony Oberdorfer says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

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Colorado Episcopalians, interfaith social justice advocates hold ‘Faithful Tuesdays’ at…

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Advocacy Peace & Justice Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By Lynette WilsonPosted May 14, 2019 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Colorado Episcopalians, interfaith social justice advocates hold ‘Faithful Tuesdays’ at state capitol Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ From Feb. 5 to the end of the Colorado General Assembly’s first 2019 regular session, an interfaith coalition held “Faithful Tuesdays” events at the capitol in Denver, focused on supporting specific legislation and forwarding a shared narrative of justice, love, healing, reconciliation and care for others. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Denver] A coalition of interfaith leaders and their allies regularly brought a social justice message to the Colorado General Assembly’s first 2019 regular session. The effort was formed from long-standing relationships rooted in multiple faith traditions, all recognizing a common humanity, shared values and a desire to change the public narrative.“About a year and a half ago, we started talking about what it would look like, what kinds of issues we could really come together on, and the power that we might have if we joined forces and called on both the people in our congregations, as well as our legislators – who are our leaders – to lead out of values grounded in our shared humanity and human dignity,” said the Rev. Amanda Henderson, executive director of the Interfaith Alliance of Colorado.Over the last two years of anti-immigrant sentiment, increased incidences of racism and racial violence, and the proliferation of shootings in schools and houses of worship, the effort, coalition members agreed, has taken on greater urgency. Hence, Faithful Tuesdays.“I feel like we have this real challenge to the soul of who we are, and there are so many powers that are seeking to divide us. There are real acts of violence happening in our faith communities and around our country at large that are grounded in hate and dehumanizing people,” said Henderson, who is a Disciples of Christ ordained minister. “We have a different story to tell, and we see that the time is urgent to tell a different story and to live a different story together.” Interested in getting involved in advocacy? The Episcopal Public Policy Network is a grassroots network of Episcopalians across the country dedicated to carrying out the Baptismal Covenant call to “strive for justice and peace” through the active ministry of public policy advocacy. Click here to learn more and join. The diverse coalition of interfaith leaders, organizations and community members who committed themselves to add a deeper, moral dimension to the public policymaking process in Colorado met weekly for Faithful Tuesdays. Their focus: “To advance a faith narrative and collaborative process that supports a just economy, promotes equity, and eradicates racism in Colorado.”Beginning on the first Tuesday in February and continuing every Tuesday throughout the General Assembly’s first 2019 legislative session, which ended May 3, the coalition held events at the capitol focused on supporting specific legislation and forwarding a shared narrative of justice, love, healing, reconciliation and care for others.Faith leaders and other committed citizens gather in the Colorado State Capitol for the first Faithful Tuesdays. Photo: Courtesy of Together Colorado“The coalition formed specifically [because] for The Episcopal Church and the Interfaith Alliance, it’s a way for us to reclaim a faith voice in public life that is not a regressive, far-right faith voice, which is the only faith voice that has existed in a substantive way in many places for decades,” said Anthony Suggs, director of advocacy and social justice for The Episcopal Church in Colorado.“For The Episcopal Church, this coincides pretty well with the reclaiming Jesus movement,” he said. “For us, how do we stop being, ‘We’re Christians, but we’re not that,’ ‘We’re Christians, but we’re not this,’ ‘We’re people of faith, but we’re not that’? How do we say, ‘We’re people of faith and this is what we care about because this is what Jesus cares about’?”The “Reclaiming Jesus: A Confession of Faith in a Time of Crisis” initiative launched in March 2018 to “reclaim Jesus” from those believed to be using Christian theology for political gain. From its inception, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry has been on board.“For me, it’s important to get people involved in this work because I don’t see a division between this and ministry; this is ministry,” said Suggs. “I don’t see a division between what we do in our churches and what we do at the capitol, and so both of them are ways to live our calling as servants for justice and followers of Jesus.”Laura Peniche of Together Colorado testified April 30 in celebration of progress made on immigration, including the expansion of a driver’s license program for undocumented immigrants. In Colorado, 60%-70% of deportations begin with a traffic stop. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceOn April 30, the last Tuesday of the legislative session, some 60 coalition members gathered one last time for a closing celebration and lament in the capitol’s south foyer. They celebrated the expansion of an existing bipartisan program that grants driver’s licenses to undocumented immigrants, a program widely support by the state’s dairy farmers; and they lamented setbacks to a proposed family leave program, which was relegated to a feasibility study. They also lamented a bill that would have allowed cities to set their own minimum wage.“The laments that we talked about today were family leave. It’s something 9to5 working women have been the lead on” for the last five years, said Mike Kromrey, executive director of Together Colorado, a faith-based nonprofit that has worked alongside community leaders to uplift children and protect human dignity since 1978. “It was supposed to be a priority in the majority party this year, and we couldn’t get it over the finish line. It’s like an example of what we would see as modest pro-family legislation, but we have a long ways to go on that.“And right now, we still have not secured another bill to allow cities to do a higher minimum wage; that got laid over today till tomorrow. We thought that was a relatively simple bill to allow localities to make their own decision – it doesn’t force anyone to ever do anything,” Kromrey said. “We have a lot of work to do, especially around economic issues. We’re very, very much a purple state; you know those kinds of issues are harder to forward either at the ballot box or the legislature or even in cities, but there are hopeful signs I would say.”In the General Assembly, the House-initiated local wage option later passed the Senate with amendments. Interest groups spent the most money on the Family Leave Act, with more than 200 lobbyists tracking the bill.“The family act has sort of been gutted at this point,” said Suggs. “It was one of Gov. [Jared] Polis’ primary focuses, but the Democrats only hold the Senate by two seats and the fact that they hold it by only two seats has shined a pretty bright light on the moderate to conservative Democrats that are in that chamber, so folks from the business community, whatever that means, have been opposed to it.”The act would have covered more than maternity and paternity leave; it would have allowed employees to take paid time off to care for family members suffering from an illness or recovering from abuse. “For employees, it would add up to about $100 a year in taxes,” Suggs said. But ultimately, “employers didn’t want to pay for it.”Some businesses were on board, like Illegal Pete’s, a popular restaurant chain that started in Boulder in 1995; and, theoretically, family leave could still take effect in 2022, said Suggs.Rabbi Eliot Baskin of Temple Emanuel in Denver issued a call to action April 30 on bills to address local minimum wage options and to protect immigrants from federal overreach. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceCoalition members, including the Interfaith Alliance of Colorado, the Colorado Catholic Conference, the Colorado Council of Churches, the Rocky Mountain Rabbinical Council, The Episcopal Church in Colorado, Colorado Sikhs, the Evangelical Lutheran Church’s Rocky Mountain Synod, Together Colorado and others, took turns hosting the Tuesday events. The topics and specific legislation addressed included criminal justice, the death penalty, immigration, homelessness, financial and racial equity and economic justice.“The Colorado Council of Churches has been involved with several of the groups involved here, and we all have been doing work separately on advocating for social justice,” said Adrian Miller, the council’s executive director and a member of Campbell Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church. “Toward the end of 2018, we all came together and said this might be a really cool thing to do. And what we had in mind was Moral Mondays in North Carolina and were just wondering, can we replicate that here in Colorado.”The coalition wanted to show a more progressive Christian-interfaith voice in Colorado, which typically polls as one of the least religious states in the country, though believers are majority evangelical Christian.“This is important especially in the Christian faith tradition, if you look at the Bible; I mean most of it is about social justice, and we are called in this time to be prophetic witnesses for social justice,” said Miller. “And I think it’s important that the progressive aspect of the church have a more public witness because I think when people hear Christianity these days, they think immediately of the very conservative segment of Christianity.”Interested in learning more about the Episcopal Service Corps? Click here.A Durham, North Carolina, native raised Free Will Baptist, Suggs studied history at New York University, where he happened upon Grace Episcopal Church at the corner of 10th Street and Broadway in Manhattan.Conveners of Faithful Tuesdays including (from right to left): Jill Wildenberg and Rev. Amanda Henderson (Interfaith Alliance of Colorado), Adrian Miller (Colorado Council of Churches), Anthony Suggs (The Episcopal Church in Colorado), Lee McNeil (Together Colorado), Rabbi Eliot Baskin (Rocky Mountain Rabbinical Council), Jenny Kraska (Colorado Catholic Conference), Rev. Caitlin Trussell (Rocky Mountain Synod of the ELCA), Sharon Bridgeforth (Together Colorado), and the Greater Metro Denver Ministerial Alliance. Photo: Courtesy of Together Colorado“I walked into the college service at the college parish with the college priest and was hooked from there,” he said. He later worked at summer camps for the Diocese of Long Island and, halfway through his senior year, became the camp and retreat coordinator at Camp DeWolfe. In September 2017, he joined the Colorado Episcopal Service Corps volunteering at the diocese in what is now his permanent role as director of advocacy and social justice.“NYU’s history department is very good at teaching its students to think critically about why history has been written a certain way, who wrote it, why they wrote it, what was left out on purpose, what was put in on purpose, and how do we look at the ways history affects current structures,” said Suggs. “So that’s mostly how I approach my work now: What has led to this moment? What are the pieces that have led to this, and what are the pieces that we are completely forgetting?”Though the legislative session has ended, the legwork at the local level and the coalition and relationship building continue year-round.“All of this work happens in relationship, none of it happens while just filling out paperwork and giving testimony,” Suggs said. “We have relationships with legislators, we have relationships with community organizers and with each other, so all of the big wins that we have legislatively have come through relationship, and I think that’s a big lesson for people who want to get involved but think that they have to do it all on their own.”– Lynette Wilson is a reporter and managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. She can be reached at [email protected] Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

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Canadian priest’s study finds gratitude can fight loneliness

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL By Tali FolkinsPosted Nov 6, 2019 Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing [Anglican Journal] Prayers and other expressions of gratitude may hold significant potential in making people feel less lonely, a small study by a priest in the Anglican Church of Canada suggests.Last summer and fall, the Rev. Eric Partridge, rector at the Anglican Church of St. Andrew in Sidney, British Columbia, paired six research volunteers from the church’s pastoral care team with six senior parishioners. Team members measured both their own and the seniors’ levels of loneliness using an assessment system employed by loneliness researchers (the UCLA Loneliness Scale) as well as a “narrative” assessment based on conversation between the volunteers and seniors. Then they met six times over the next 14 weeks to perform gratitude practices together. When researchers and seniors were assessed again at the end of the 14 weeks, all of the seniors and some of the researchers showed reduced levels of loneliness. The study also assessed participants’ levels of gratitude before and after the 14 weeks, Partridge says, and found similar results.Read the full article here. Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canadian priest’s study finds gratitude can fight loneliness Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

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Church of Uganda aims to fight trafficking through new mobile…

first_img Human Trafficking Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Paul Davis, Archbishop Stanley Ntagali, John Kafwanka and Canon William Ongeng. Photo: Church of Uganda[Anglican Communion News Service] A new mobile app has been launched by the Church of Uganda to help young people avoid falling into human trafficking when they seek work abroad.The new free app called Just Good Work, developed by clergyman Paul Davis, was commended by the archbishop of the Church of Uganda, Stanley Ntagali, when he was given a presentation by the developers this week.Archbishop Ntagali had warned against the increasing cases of human trafficking over the past few years.Read the entire article here. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska center_img Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Africa, Featured Events Church of Uganda aims to fight trafficking through new mobile app An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Anglican Communion, Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Advocacy Peace & Justice, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA By Rachel FarmerPosted Jan 2, 2020 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

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With community in mind, Episcopal schools shift to distance learning

first_img Rector Washington, DC By Heather Beasley DoylePosted Apr 16, 2020 With Shattuck-St. Mary’s School in Faribault, Minnesota, closed to in-person classes, sixth and seventh graders have an online reading hour with their teacher, Ms. Viruly. Photo courtesy of Shattuck-St. Mary’s School[Episcopal News Service] “As a boarding school, one of the things you never plan for is not having your students on campus,” Head of School Matt Cavellier recently told Episcopal News Service. But with the coronavirus in all 50 states, Cavellier’s school, Shattuck-St. Mary’s School in Faribault, Minnesota, is just one of at least 124,000 affected by the pandemic: Its campus is closed for in-person learning and will be for some time.These days, Shattuck-St. Mary’s School’s 449 students learn from home, the majority in different states and countries. Three days a week they’re on their own time, while two days a week they attend virtual classes together. The Episcopal school, like others with boarders, considered time zones and location, as well as technology equity, as they transitioned to distance learning at the end of March.Cavellier acknowledged that private school students, on the whole, are more privileged than their public school counterparts; some schools’ one-to-one laptop or tablet programs have made moving online easier. Nonetheless, all of the schools that spoke with ENS have asked specifically about their students’ home equipment and internet access. They have also accounted for countries’ varying online resources: Shattuck-St. Mary’s School has connected parents with messaging apps WeChat in China and Kakao in South Korea.Like at Shattuck-St. Mary’s, administrators at St. Andrew’s School in Middletown, Delaware, were caught off guard when they had to ask their all-boarding student body of ninth through 12th graders not to return from their spring break on March 17 as planned. With its students still away, the school took three days to collect itself and to figure out a distance learning plan.“As an institution, we had never planned for something like this,” Dean of Teaching and Learning Elizabeth Roach recently told ENS. In short order, St. Andrew’s School devised an inaugural distance teaching formula based on its everyday online systems (online learning platform Canvas, Gmail, Google Docs and Google Drive). The school added in an education plan of the now-ubiquitous video conferencing platform Zoom. Its 306 students had left campus planning to return; 16% are from outside the United States. On March 18, they distributed a student needs survey and, based on the responses, sent students the books and materials they’d left in their dorm rooms.“Of course, some international students couldn’t get their books, so we were sure to either get PDF copies or get things sent to them, or make things available the best they could,” said Roach.Over the past month, similar shuffling and planning have unfolded at Episcopal schools throughout the United States. As schools have wrestled with difficult decisions around reopening after break, sending boarding students home and halting in-person classes, “What we’re finding is that every school’s challenges are a little bit different,” said Brad Rathgeber, head of school and CEO of One Schoolhouse, a nonprofit that provides online courses and programs and trains teachers in distance learning. In general, he said, schools’ biggest challenge over the past three or four weeks has been launching their distance learning programs.Rathgeber noted that, as the coronavirus spread, some schools lacked even the basic foundations to enable distance learning, namely an online learning management system such as Google Classroom or Moodle. All of the schools that ENS spoke with had that in place, as well as email — yet differences remained.Will Vogel, a sophomore at St. Andrew’s School in Middletown, Delaware, uses Zoom’s screen share function to share his homework solution in a breakout session during his virtual honors physics class. Photo: Chris SanchezThe H1N1 pandemic prompted Episcopal Day School in Augusta, Georgia, to prepare for the possibility that its 365 students, who are local 2½-year-olds through eighth graders, might someday for some reason all need to stay home. According to Head of School Ned Murray, the school community practiced cyberdays, during which students learn remotely. The school’s team took March 16 off from teaching to prepare, then began distance learning the following day. It’s gone smoothly, but “even still, this was a monumental task,” he said.At Oregon Episcopal School, increasingly intense winters and the prospect of a major earthquake were reasons to do “foundational work on distance learning,” said Peter Kraft, associate head of school and upper school English teacher. As COVID-19 spread just three hours’ drive north in Seattle, Washington, Kraft and others at the day and boarding school of 870 students in pre-K through 12th grade began preparing to possibly send their boarding students home and teach their entire student body remotely. After two weeks of readying, the Oregon school went online in two stages beginning March 23.Meanwhile, Shattuck-St. Mary’s School, in Minnesota, hadn’t anticipated the technological leap required to continue teaching. Nonetheless, Cavellier feels the school was reasonably positioned for distance learning because its current blend of synchronous (in which students participate at the same time) and asynchronous (in which students can complete activities at their convenience) learning is “kind of how our school has worked for our blended class anyways.”Episcopal Day School in Augusta, Georgia, shares some of its students’ assignments and work via Facebook as the school settles into its distance learning mode. Photo courtesy of Episcopal Day SchoolNow, at Shattuck-St. Mary’s and beyond, teachers are figuring how best to use their bolstered online platforms. Each school decided upon guiding principles, or priorities, and moved forward from there. At Episcopal Day School, whose students vary widely in age, “We have spent a lot of time … looking over the developmental continuity of our expectations,” as they’ve planned for this eventuality, said Murray. “There are a lot more challenges to engaging a 2½- or 3-year-old outside the classroom and through distance learning than it is a 10-year-old or a 12-year-old.” Teachers with older students are mindful of the energy required for a Zoom class. They are also adapting their offerings to fit both the delivery method and the larger human context.“Some of our students are working, taking care of their younger siblings at home, all sorts of things, so we wanted to make that reasonable,” said Roach, from St. Mary’s. “At the same time, we also wanted to make sure we were teaching and they were learning the essential skills in the disciplines, so that required a redesign of our courses.”Even as schools have continued teaching, grades have taken a backseat in nearly all cases to the top priorities of community and students’ emotional well-being. At Shattuck-St. Mary’s, the first week online was dedicated almost entirely to community building, while St. Andrew’s School has developed procedures with an angle of care and flexibility.“Something that might have otherwise been a disciplinary issue — now it’s an advising issue, or the follow-up is checking in: [Is] everything OK? Did you get the link to today’s worksheet?” said St. Andrew’s English teacher Gretchen Hurtt, who is also dean of studies. And to maintain community bonds and a sense of normalcy, most schools have also moved daily school-wide morning greetings, chapel, and advisory into the virtual sphere.“There’s a lot of things that are more important than simply academics and content, and we know our kids are going through kind of a trauma here,” said Cavellier. “School … shifted, but the way that they were experiencing it has ended, at least for a while,” he said, adding that he wants those in his school community to feel OK acknowledging any grief they feel.That grief, as well as the pandemic behind it, if not unprecedented is beyond most people’s experiences — unlike a snow day or a school maintenance issue. The COVID-19 outbreak affects everyone, making administrators worry for faculty and staff.“It’s the most challenging and complex issue or moment in my 40 years of teaching. It is by far the most complex moment because so much of it is how we are all managing it psychologically. … [Faculty] are teaching with their young kids at home, who are also trying to learn online,” said Roach.Beth Crook, technology project manager at St. Andrew’s School, works in her car in the lead-up to the launch of virtual teaching and remote learning at the Episcopal all-boarding school in Delaware. Photo courtesy of St. Andrew’s SchoolAmid the logistical, pedagogical and emotional layers, shifting to distance learning has proven a herculean task. “Those first two weeks were probably the most difficult we’ve ever had in our careers,” said Murray, whose Episcopal Day School had prepared so diligently for this very eventuality.On the whole, whether one, two or three weeks in, Episcopal schools report that the hard work is paying off: Students are showing up for their Zoom classes and logging in to complete their virtual work. Importantly, seeing grids of each other’s photos on screens has buoyed students and faculty alike. Moreover, “there is a group of students who are thriving in this environment,” said Murray. Others agreed. Introverts who wouldn’t speak up in person have new options, and the virtual environment lends itself to individual and small-group help. “We’ll have to reflect on that,” he added.As educators, students and families find new communal rhythms, Rathgeber recommends that administrators and faculty keep things simple, do what they already know how to do and transmit calm to their communities. He notes that, as new phases arise, so will new challenges, notably, finding new ways of supporting students.Above all, he urges schools to keep emotional and social well-being at the core of their work by creating community and building trust. “And I think that that’s honestly where Episcopal school leaders can do just amazing work,” he said. “In Episcopal schools, you just think about the pastoral care that we need to give to the community so effectively and well. We can translate a lot of those practices to the online space.”– Heather Beasley Doyle is a freelance journalist, writer and editor based in Massachusetts. She has previously written about education and racial reconciliation for Episcopal News Service. With community in mind, Episcopal schools shift to distance learning Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Health & Healthcare Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME COVID-19, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

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Episcopal Church voices support for DACA recipients as Supreme Court…

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Immigration Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Faith & Politics, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By David PaulsenPosted May 6, 2020 Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Public Policy Network, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Activists and DACA recipients march up Broadway in New York, New York, during a 2018 rally to demand that Congress pass the DREAM Act. Photo: Reuters[Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church is bolstering its advocacy in support of undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, with the U.S. Supreme Court poised to rule on the fate of a federal program that has protected about 700,000 of them from deportation.A ruling could come any day on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, an immigration policy implemented in 2012 by the Obama administration. DACA granted conditional protection to this group of immigrants, sometimes referred to as DREAMers, many of whom are too young to remember their native countries. The Trump administration ordered an end to the program in September 2017, arguing that these immigrants’ legal residency status needs to be addressed by legislation, not executive action.“The Episcopal Church has long supported a path to citizenship for undocumented people brought to the United States as youth. That commitment to legislative protections for DREAMers remains solid as ever,” said Rushad Thomas, a policy adviser with The Episcopal Church’s Washington, D.C.-based Office of Government Relations.All rulings for the Supreme Court’s current term are due to be handed down by the end of June. During oral arguments in November, members of the court’s conservative majority appeared willing to agree with the Trump administration that it was justified in ending the protections.Even if the court rules in favor of the Trump administration, church officials and Episcopalians around the country plan to build on their ongoing advocacy for a legislative solution that will reflect the biblical call to love your neighbor and welcome the stranger. The Office of Government Relations held a virtual action day in April, when Episcopalians contacted their lawmakers and asked them to support DACA recipients. Another action day is planned for early June. The office also conducts nonpartisan advocacy on Capitol Hill through regular contact with the staffs of lawmakers from both parties.Episcopal Migration Ministries also has been active on the issue, joining the Office of Government Relations to host a webinar on April 16 that featured a panel discussion with three Episcopalians who have received DACA protection. The webinar began with a prayer and reflection from the Rev. Nancy Frausto, a DACA recipient who serves as associate rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Long Beach, California.“This is a personal issue for me and for the many, many other young people who are desperately fighting for their lives at this moment, and praying and hoping,” Frausto said.An estimated 3.6 million undocumented immigrants were brought to the United States before they turned 18, according to the Migration Policy Institute. They are called DREAMers after the DREAM Act, legislation that has been pending since 2001 to offer permanent status to some of those stuck in legal limbo, including students.DACA recipients are a subset of DREAMers. Active recipients of the protections and those with pending renewals totaled 675,000 as of Dec. 31. The program didn’t give recipients a path to citizenships, but they were allowed to work in the United States without fear of being deported and must apply for renewal every two years.Renewals are still being processed amid the pending legal challenges to the Trump administration’s move to end the program. Some immigrant advocates, including the Diocese of Los Angeles’ Interfaith Refugee and Immigration Service, are encouraging DACA recipients to apply for renewal now, because it might help their cases in the future if the Supreme Court rules against the program.A ruling against DACA could have ramifications for efforts in the United States to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. An estimated 27,000 health care workers are DACA recipients, and some of those workers filed a supplemental brief in March with the Supreme Court opposing efforts to terminate the program.Popular opinion has generally sided with efforts to allow Frausto and other DREAMers to remain in this country if they meet certain criteria, as outlined by the DACA program. Such policies and proposals occasionally have drawn bipartisan support in Congress as well, and sometimes even from President Donald Trump, whose administration otherwise has sought to reduce both illegal and legal immigration to the United States. Even so, passing immigration reforms historically has been an uphill battle.The Episcopal Church’s General Convention has long supported humane immigration policies, most recently in July 2018, when the 79th General Convention met in Austin, Texas. One resolution adopted by bishops and deputies reaffirmed the church’s call for comprehensive immigration reform and singled out the plight of DACA recipients. It voiced support for “passing of federal legislation that presents a pathway to citizenship for undocumented youth and young adults known as DREAMers.”The Rev. Nancy Frausto, associate rector at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Long Beach, California, participates in a webinar about the immigration program known as DACA hosted April 16 by Episcopal Migration Ministries and the Office of Government Relations.Frausto, during the EMM webinar, invoked the words of Episcopalians’ Baptismal Covenant in urging more people of faith to join in those efforts.“For those who believe in the power of God’s love and have vowed to fight for the dignity of every single human being, we need you,” Frausto said. “We need people to stand on our side to fight for our right to stay in this country, our country.”One way Episcopalians can get involved is by joining the Office of Government Relations’ Episcopal Public Policy Network, which sends action alerts to its members and coordinates advocacy on issues such as immigration and DACA.“Regardless of how the Supreme Court rules in the coming weeks, you can be sure The Episcopal Branch of the Jesus Movement will continue to stand with DREAMers and continue to advocate for a just legal settlement for them and their families,” Thomas told ENS by email.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church voices support for DACA recipients as Supreme Court decision looms Featured Eventslast_img read more

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Frank Logue consecrated 11th bishop of Georgia

first_img Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Consecrations, Tags Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC [Diocese of Georgia] The Rt. Rev. Frank Logue was ordained and consecrated as the 11th bishop of the Diocese of Georgia on Saturday, May 30 at Christ Episcopal Church in Savannah. The Rt. Rev. Scott Benhase, 10th bishop of Georgia served as the chief consecrator. He was joined by the Rt. Rev. Sean Rowe, bishop of Southwest Pennsylvania and Western New York, and the Rt. Rev. Rob Wright, bishop of Atlanta.The service was livestreamed through the diocesan Facebook page and the diocesan YouTube channel. The livestream itself was a combination of pre-recorded videos and a live feed of the service.On May 31, Logue participated in a peaceful protest in Savannah as a response to a call from Savannah Mayor Van Johnson’s request for clergy across all faith traditions and denominations. In response to the news of the raging protests in 40 cities and the National Guard called out in 26 states, including Georgia, Logue said, “Who can not be shaken to the core when a man is killed by a policeman as he cries out, ‘I can’t breathe, sir’? Out faith in Jesus compels us to stand against evil, even as we seek to root out this evil implanted within us. Until everyone has justice, none of us can truly be free.”As Logue looks towards the future of the Diocese of Georgia and his new role as bishop, he said: “At our best it is bonds of affection which tie our church together. I look forward to the steady, patient work I see ahead of us. One thing I see most clearly is that if we remain focused on Jesus, rather than on the church, the Diocese of Georgia will not simply survive, but thrive and I love getting to be a part of that. We will get to see lives and communities transformed by the love of God. Who doesn’t want that?” Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN House of Bishops Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Frank Logue consecrated 11th bishop of Georgia Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Posted Jun 2, 2020 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more

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Apopka Commissioners weigh-in on Task Force report

first_img 2 COMMENTS Reply Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! Lydia Mosten Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 I support and encourage scrutiny of tax payer dollars, where were these commissioner’s to scrutinize the $100k of tax payer dollar to approve the Mayor’s beer and wine festival for Apopka? Don’t use my tax dollars for libations. We need more groups in Apopka like this one, the America people are tired of being screwed by politician who only want to tell us whats good for us. Joel Petterscenter_img Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSApopka Community Task Force on violenceCommissioner Billie DeanCommissioner Doug BanksonCommissioner Kyle Becker Previous articleRichard Anderson court date setNext articleBiggest Apopka stories of 2016: Black Lives Matter comes to town Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR I commend the efforts of this group, however I find it interesting that after the hard work has been done, now the politicians have the ideas about what and where to do anything with tax payer money that they don’t use properly to begin with. This is a no win for those people, but again job well done. Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 But are they inclined to participate?On Wednesday the Apopka Community Task Force released a report in which it requests $1.8 million to fight violence in South Apopka. The vast majority of the request would come from state funding, but $165,000 would be from The City of Apopka. Three commissioners that attended and participated the most in the Task Force events were Doug Bankson, Kyle Becker and Billie Dean. All three had thoughts on the Task Force and its report, especially as it related to Apopka’s participation in the funding.Do they have an appetite for this initiative?Becker – “I think the mission and focus of the task force is critical in creating safe and productive communities.”Bankson elaborated on many parts of the meetings and report, and believes it’s time to change the way some people perceive Apopka.“This has been a well attended community effort seeking positive answers to real world issues,” he said. “As an elected official I was happy to have been able to observe and encourage the process. I do like the focus on educational options which do not limit those who are in a negative environment from better opportunities. I also like the emphasis on improving relations with law enforcement. The unfortunate political climate in our nation lends itself to distrust, and anything we can do to bridge the gap is a great step forward. Reducing crime is beneficial to the whole of the city therefore it’s not misspent by focusing it on the most crime ridden area. Apopka’s image is paramount when drawing new business to the area which creates opportunity and benefits everyone. Perception is reality, and changing the perception begins when we address the problems.”Dean – “I thank God for people like Rod Love, Ken Wilson and Greg Jackson… all of the task force entourage because they see a need and come together.”Becker pointed to the timing of the final report being beneficial given the violent events of the last few weeks in Central Florida.“I think the mission and focus of the task force is critical in creating safe and productive communities, and along with challenges we have seen in Pine Hills and Orlando, the efforts of this task force are most importantly timely,” he said.  “I had the opportunity to participate in most, if not all of the task force community meetings with residents and community leaders, and it’s great to see those thoughts consolidated and formalized in the released report.”Dean is the elder statesman of the City Commission. He has been fighting for South Apopka causes for years, and is skeptical that things will ever change. He also believes the Apopka/Orange County border hampers improvement. He did, however shower praise on the Task Force’s efforts.“I’ve been a commissioner for two decades, and very little has changed on this side of town. The problem is The City of Apopka’s hands are tied to some extent, because our border ends at 10th Street. Everything south of there is Orange County. We cannot help beyond there because of the layout. However the city has nothing for young people to do. No boys club or girls club. Both the county and city treat this side of town like a step child. We don’t have anything to invigorate our children. They are stuck. There is nothing. And then people are surprised when they steal cars or break into houses. I thank God for people like Rod Love, Ken Wilson and Greg Jackson… and all of the task force entourage because they see a need and come together. It’s not all about money. We have to have community involvement too.”As for the $165,000 request from The City of Apopka, all three commissioners seemed to be open to the idea, but in need of more details before they gave their approval.Bankson – “I like the emphasis on improving relations with law enforcement. The unfortunate political climate in our nation lends itself to distrust, and anything we can do to bridge the gap is a great step forward.”“I would want request and disbursement of funds to be justified by the cost of the program presented rather than merely asking for a set amount and then deciding how it will be spent,” said Bankson. “This is a backwards approach to funding that does not lend itself to efficiency or accountability. However I have ideas that may set aside certain funds based on a percentage approach to each area of the city to be spent on that which most appropriately meets the needs of the immediate community.”Becker also looked for more defined uses of the funds.“I look forward to having further discussions with task force members to understand a little more detail about the programs proposed and how any approved funding would be allocated to ensure short term and sustainable success.”Dean was the most open to funding the task force, but he too would call for accountability.“I do feel like we should put the ($165,000) money up as a guarantee so the state will see we are serious. And we’ll make sure they spend it correctly.”In closing, Bankson hoped the Task Force would continue to involve and engage the community as it did earlier in the year.“I would like to see follow up workshops that would allow interaction between citizens and public servants based on these findings. Interaction and communication are key to finding the best solutions. Perhaps this could be done in a town hall format that affords such interaction. Bottom line, it is good to see community involvement in problem solving and I am hopeful that we can see positive solutions from the task force groundwork.” December 31, 2016 at 9:21 am December 31, 2016 at 9:08 am You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herelast_img read more

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5 Rules for Spring Cleaning

first_img Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear Don’t be intimidated by the annual event – plan Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.center_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate TAGSSpring Cleaning Previous articleSurviving Ebola: Documentary shows the battle was wonNext articleFormer Apopka employee files federal whistleblower lawsuit Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Spring is a time for fresh beginnings, which makes it the perfect time to declutter the house and even do some deep cleaning. Spring cleaning doesn’t have to be intimidating. How to do this? Don’t make impossible goals, but simply think about making your home safer and healthier. Here are 5 rules that make tackling spring cleaning tasks easier. Open a few windows and get started!Rule #1: Make a list and a scheduleOkay, so this isn’t exactly cleaning, but it’s important. Making a list of tasks is a great first step because it can help you stay organized and give you a clear idea of what you want to accomplish. Plus, crossing things off a list can be oh-so-satisfying!After you’ve made a list of tasks like when you will mow the lawn, clean the gutters, take out the extra stuff in your garage and offer to charity, or store away for later use in a London Storage Facility, create a schedule. Start with the more time-consuming tasks and make sure to create a reasonable schedule based on your needs. Spring cleaning doesn’t need to be done in a day or even a couple of days. There’s a reason why we call it spring cleaning because you should space it out over spring. The worst thing you can do is overschedule and overtask yourself. If your schedule seems impossible to meet, then you’re likely to give up on your spring cleaning plans.Rule #2: Start with the kitchenIt’s often the most time consuming and involved because it’s the one room we USE every day. There’s a ton of tips online, but when you clean the oven, it’s actually best to start it the night before and finish it up the next morning. The best products need to sit overnight.  Then, tackle those unorganized cabinets and the dreaded Tupperware drawer or cabinet.Rule #3: Don’t forget the nooks and cranniesHave you looked behind your fridge lately? Yikes! Now is the time to check those pesky areas that you don’t usually clean, like under all the furniture, the top of shelves, the back of cabinets or closets. Those areas are dust and dirt magnets. You’ll probably be surprised at just how filthy they are.Rule #4: Deep clean hardware When you think spring cleaning, you might think of larger projects like organizing the garage. While that is definitely a noble cause, don’t forget doorknobs, light switches and handles. These are things we touch every day. While you likely clean these on a regular basis, doing a deeper cleaning in the spring allows you to really remove those excess winter germs and bacteria.Rule #5: The One Year RuleOne of the biggest spring cleaning tasks is deciding to give away items we no longer use. When you’re going through your closet, think about the one year rule – if you haven’t used it in a year, donate it! This is where you have to be honest (and harsh) with yourself. That fondue pot you thought was a great idea, but you really don’t have time for it- donate it! That dress that you loved in the store, but doesn’t really fit- donate it!Utilizing the one year rule is a great way to declutter your space and declutter your life.last_img read more

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