Listen To The New Sexual Thunder! Futuristic Funk Groove, “Round and Round” [Premiere]

first_imgHigh-energy psychedelic future funk band Sexual Thunder! is on a roll.A packed fall show schedule has seen the group open up for NOLA legends Rebirth Brass Band and Dumpstaphunk, and play high-profile slots at Tipitina’s and the Maple Leaf Bar. Halloween weekend culminated in the band’s first-ever music festival play at Voodoo Music and Arts Festival where the band got to perform for NOLA natives as well as a national audience.Now Sexy T (as the band is known by friends, family, and fans) presents its first major single release since its debut EP, Cheek Sweat. The new track, “Round and Round,” presents a new iteration of the band’s signature sound: blending old-school funk with contemporary synth soundscapes and electronic drums.A tribute to the band’s collective creative style, this track went through many hands before reaching its final state. Two-time Grammy Award-winning producer Chris Finney (engineer and producer for surging NOLA acts The Revivalists and Naughty Professor) engineered the original sessions. Following up with production from the band’s sonic advisor Dave Wolfe, the song found its completion with a mix by local producer/drummer/songwriter Aaron Boudreaux.Listen to the new single, streaming below.Sexual Thunder! will be presenting this song live, as well as many more from their catalog, at One Eyed Jacks in New Orleans’ French Quarter on Friday November 11, supported by the up-and-coming band Sexy Dex and the Fresh. Find more info here.last_img read more

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A bold pathway in life — and biology

first_imgAnthony Covarrubias grew up in a working-class neighborhood in South Los Angeles. While celebrities in sports cars whizzed to the beach just a few miles away, Covarrubias’ neighbors waited in long lines at the local health clinic for low-quality care they couldn’t afford. Although his parents worked hard to make ends meet, access to health care and health benefits was not always available. Acutely aware of this disparity from a young age, Covarrubias decided to get an education and help correct the injustice.For this Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health doctoral student, now in his final year in the Biological Sciences program, the quest to cure metabolic diseases is personal. He’s seen family members and neighbors suffer from diabetes and recently learned of a graduate from his high school who died young from atherosclerosis. Finding a cure for conditions that disproportionately shorten the lives of the poor and people of color won’t be easy, but Covarrubias is in it for the long haul.“Science teaches you to be patient and persevere,” he says. “Sometimes experiments don’t work out. Sometimes we give it our best effort and it’s still not enough. But that’s what I have signed up for.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Azalea care

first_imgAzaleas in full bloom are a sign that spring has sprung in the South. Georgia’s unpredictable weather has blooms on the Southern favorite popping out early. To keep azaleas at their best, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialists offer a few maintenance tips. When azaleas complete their blooming season, it will be time to fertilize, prune and mulch. Fertilize with a balanced fertilizer such as 10-10-10 or one especially formulated for acid-loving plants. Follow label directions carefully as azalea roots are located very close to the soil surface. Over fertilization can cause damage and plant death. Overgrown limbs should be pruned out to restore the plant’s natural shape. Delaying pruning until later in the season can destroy next year’s flower buds. Lace bugs are the primary insect pest on azaleas. They feed on the leaves with their piercing-sucking mouthparts. The upper sides of the damaged leaves show a whitish speckling caused by the insects feeding on the undersides of the leaves. Garden stores carry the necessary insecticides to control lace bugs. Another problem occasionally seen on azaleas is iron deficiency. Sometimes iron deficiency is confused with lace bug damage. Iron deficiency gives the leaves a pale yellow appearance rather than the white speckling caused by lace bugs. Again, garden stores stock iron supplements that can be sprayed on the plants or applied to the soil to correct the problem. To manage moisture, azalea plants need a good soaking of water once a week. A 3- to 4- inch layer of mulch in flowerbeds will conserve moisture and reduce weed competition. For more information on home landscaping, contact your local UGA Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more

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Corn Prices

first_imgPotential record-setting corn yields have contributed to a bleak market for Georgia farmers, says University of Georgia agricultural economist, Nathan Smith. Smith also believes next year’s price will be worse than this year’s.“I think next year we’re looking more at corn farmers just trying to survive,” said Smith, a Tifton-based economist with UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.September corn prices are projected at $3.66. For December, the price is projected to be $3.77. Georgia corn prices are projected between $3.75-$4.25 per bushel depending on the region of the state. The prices are well below the $6 and $7 contracts that some Georgia farmers signed last year. Enduring consecutive years of prices under $4 would not be ideal for Georgia farmers, but their options may be limited when planning for next year’s crop. “The concern for next year is, if they cut back in corn — they already did that this year — what are they going to plant? Look at cotton prices,” said Smith. Cotton, a normal rotational crop with corn, is currently priced at 64 cents per pound. “Peanuts aren’t going to be up there either. Across the board, as good as it looked a couple of years ago, it’s looking as bad this year.”For some farmers, covering this year’s production expenses will be a challenge with prices below $4.“Without land rent, if you want to break even on total costs at 200 bushels, we’re looking at $4.60 a bushel. You’re talking about a $5 price to cover all costs and pay yourself,” said Smith, who does not project prices to reach that high this year.The most likely scenario in which Smith sees corn prices trending upward would be if demand increases, in particular with ethanol production, or if China buys more corn.High yields are due in large part to a resurgence in corn production in the Midwest, also known as the Corn Belt. After enduring a prolonged drought, the region’s corn production is on the rise, which has helped flood a saturated market. The United States Department of Agriculture predicts 14,032 million bushels of corn will be produced for 2014-15. This is 172 million bushels higher than previously projected.Smith warned farmers of the grim outlook at winter and spring meetings.As evidenced by acreage, Georgia farmers were ready for a bleak forecast. After growing 510,000 acres last year, only 325,000 acres were planted in corn this year. That number could drop below 300,000 in 2015 if farmers choose to scale back production even more, which Smith says is likely.Corn farmers can get an early outlook on the 2015 growing season when Ag Forecast is held in Georgia in January. Ag Forecast, presented by UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Georgia Farm Bureau and Georgia Department of Agriculture, is a series of discussions led by UGA faculty, focusing on different crops and pressing agricultural issues. Next year’s Ag Forecast will begin on Jan. 14 in Gainesville at the Brenau Georgia Mountain Center.The Ag Forecast events will be held in Gainesville, Carrollton, Cartersville, Lyons, Tifton and Macon.For more information about corn production in Georgia, go to http://www.caes.uga.edu/commodities/fieldcrops/gagrains/corn.html.last_img read more

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USDA Grant

first_imgIn an effort to use the latest technological advancements to benefit families, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has awarded the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences a $72,000 grant.USDA Undersecretary for Rural Development Lisa Mensah made the formal announcement on Tuesday, Oct. 13, in front of UGA’s new Future Farmstead site, located on the CAES campus in Tifton, Georgia. The grant is aimed at sharing the technology and building methods used to construct the Future Farmstead, a net-zero energy project, with builders so they can construct affordable housing for south Georgia residents.USDA officials were on hand for a seminar with contractors and others to discuss the USDA Rural Development and UGA Research Foundation’s technology-sharing program and the program’s required guidelines. Additionally, USDA officials shared information on a loan program geared towards providing low-income families with greater opportunities to purchase a home.The loans are designed for families without adequate housing, but who can afford mortgage payments and have reasonable credit histories. Restrictions regarding annual income and the value of the home do apply. Local USDA staff can assist interested parties.“There is so much excitement surrounding the Future Farmstead project, and the chance that we can put that technology to use to help someone own their own home is exciting,” Mensah said. “This program is designed to help people in rural communities achieve those dreams.”Craig Kvien, the UGA professor who directed the planning and development of the Future Farmstead, said that incorporating the latest innovations featured in the farmstead “just makes sense.”“If your power bill averages $10 a month, you can take what you’re saving and roll that into a mortgage payment,” he said. “All of this technology is on the market. As a matter of fact, several builders are already using it and it works.”Mensah said the USDA Rural Development program has $200 billion in outstanding loans, making it the 14th largest bank in the world. The loans have a 1 percent interest rate with no down payment.“The goal is to get people to own more than they owe,” she said. “We’re asked all of the time how we can improve lives in rural America. This is it.”Andrew Young, former congressman, mayor of Atlanta and U.S. ambassador, joined Mensah and other members of the USDA staff in making the announcement. Young remarked that he always enjoyed returning to south Georgia, where he lived in the 1950s while serving as a pastor of a church in Thomasville, Georgia.“It’s always great to come back here, especially now for two big reasons – air conditioning and integration,” he said.Congressman Austin Scott also lauded the program as a way for rural Georgians to improve their lives. He also complimented Kvien and Joe West, assistant dean for the UGA Tifton Campus, on their drive to see the Future Farmstead project through. Quinton Robinson, USDA Rural Development director for Georgia, said he has a passion for low-income housing and that home ownership should be a lofty goal. “The net-zero concept is a great one and can mean a great deal to a lot of people,” he said. “But this won’t happen without a big push from the industry.”Mensah, staff members from regional USDA offices, including Tifton Director Fred Council, UGA staff and other interested parties toured the Future Farmstead site following the grant announcement.last_img read more

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Peach Crop

first_imgGeorgia’s peach crop may suffer this year due to insufficient chill hours, which are essential to peach production, according to Jeff Cook, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Taylor and Peach counties.Depending on the variety, peaches need a minimum of 500 to 800 chill hours. Much of the peach crop has been unable to break dormancy and progress from a closed, tight bud to a fruit due to this year’s unseasonably warm winter conditions.“We’re about 300 hours or more away from where we want to be,” Cook said. “We are definitely going to see some yield reduction, but it is hard to know how much right now.”According to UGA Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells, fruit trees require a certain number of hours below 45 degrees Fahrenheit to break down growth inhibitors in buds, which allow them to produce fruit in the spring. The number of chill hours required to break dormancy varies among peach varieties.  While the low-chill varieties are blooming, the high-chill varieties are expected to bloom later than normal, Cook said. In normal years with lower temperatures, blooms typically set around early to mid-March. This year, however, high-chill varieties will not bloom until late March or mid-April. Cook said blooms may appear at the tips of stems, but the bases of branches will have tight buds.Sporadic blooms can lead to varying fruit size and pit deformities, which becomes a quality issue. Though these factors don’t affect flavor, these peaches are less likely to visually appeal to consumers.“Chill hours are the key to producing a successful peach. All Georgia peach farmers realize that we haven’t had a cool winter this year, so a decrease in this year’s crop is expected,” Wells said. “How much of a decline remains to be seen.”Growers have tried to combat the low number of chill hours by leaving more wood on the trees so that more fruit will grow, and by applying chemicals to help the fruit break dormancy. This chemical has been sprayed on many acres this year, and growers tend to have better luck in low-chill environments, such as Florida and south Georgia, Cook said. According to the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, the farm gate value for Georgia peaches in 2015 came in at more than $48.9 million.For more information about Georgia’s peach crop, see UGA Extension’s peach blog update at blog.extension.uga.edu/peaches.(Julia Rodriquez is an intern at UGA Tifton.)last_img read more

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Data Geek: How to get more out of your organization’s referral program data

first_imgHere’s how it works:A person who was referred through your referral program comes to your website or brick and mortar store and proceeds to make their first purchase.  They happen to meet all of the conditions of the referral program, and just like that, loop closed, everyone gets rewarded.End of story, right? Not so much.Here at RewardStream, as an analyst, I can only see the transactional piece of the relationship. I see the referral going out and the referred person coming back, and depending on the program, I sometimes get to see the price or value of the purchase. The data analytics team here at RewardStream can do some pretty butt-kicking analysis with just that information alone.Now, that’s all well and good, and if your program is generating new business why bother digging further?You see, by making a referral, a customer is self-selecting. They’re putting their hand up, jumping up and down, and saying, ‘Hey! Look at me. I want to help you generate more customers! ’. They just answered THE question: ‘Would you refer our product or service to your friends and family?’ Not every one of your customers becomes a referring customer and by virtue of that fact, your referrers are extremely SPECIAL. In a good way. When things are special, data geeks like me want to know why. More to the point though, we want to know how to use this information to our advantage. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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The Flight of the Snowbird

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Climate change, even though it’s a complete hoax, has so messed with our weather patterns on Long Island that the calendar no longer dictates the temperatures we’ve come to associate with our seasons.Case in point, the first day of December was a moderate 50 degrees. The sun shined. Birds chirped. Light sweaters sufficed for cover. A day earlier, the bitter freezing, driving rain caused Canadian geese to migrate northward to escape the cold. Nothing is what it has ever been–or ever will be again.In short, it’s getting weird.The calendar no longer suffices when it comes to predicting the weather. The weather forecasters seldom seem to get it right. How do you know when it’s time to break out the winter coats, dust off the UGGs you preemptively brought out in the first week of October because drinking pumpkin-spiced lattes in flip flops just seemed wrong, and resign yourself to the reality of an unavoidably brutal New York winter?Why, you follow the flight of the snowbirds, of course.Snowbirds, unlike the newly-coined invective “snowflake,” is northeastern slang for those who move from New York to Florida in the wintertime. There is no set date for this migration. It just happens.You notice by the increasing traffic surrounding LaGuardia and JFK airports. The lobbies fill with smart blue-and white-haired folk who have put in their time enduring biting air that hurts your face, the indignity of trying-and failing-to keep balance while walking across parking lots made treacherous with black ice, and suffered countless flat tires on Long Island’s many, many, many potholes. (So many. But don’t worry. Road construction crews will repair the roads come spring time. During rush hour. At your expense. You’re welcome.)That’s right, those who have paid their LI winter dues will head southbound to the land of sun, sand and white pants in winter. How do they know exactly when to shuffle off this frigid coil and head down? Well, no one knows exactly.Scientists could study it, but who would listen? All we know is that like canaries in the coal mines, when you see airports teeming with grandparents and moving trucks heading from New York to the sunshine state, winter is nigh.(Photo credit: Pixar’s Up)last_img read more

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IATA data reveals slowdown in aviation recovery | News

first_imgCapacity plummeted 79 per cent, and load factor withered 38 percentage points to 43 per cent.Domestic demand in September was down 43 per cent compared to the previous year, improved from a 51 per cent decline in August. Compared to 2019, capacity fell by a third and the load factor dropped 12 percentage points to 70 per cent.- Advertisement – OlderWizz partners with CarTrawler for new rental options This is only a slightly improvement over the 75 per cent year-to-year decline recorded in August.Capacity was down 63 per cent compared to a year ago and load factor fell 22 percentage points to 60 per cent.International passenger demand in September plunged 89 per cent compared to September 2019, basically unchanged from the 88.5 per cent decline recorded in August. – Advertisement – “We have hit a wall in the industry’s recovery. “A resurgence in Covid-19 outbreaks – particularly in Europe and the US – combined with governments’ reliance on the blunt instrument of quarantine in the absence of globally aligned testing regimes, has halted momentum toward re-opening borders to travel. “Although domestic markets are doing better, this is primarily owing to improvements in China and Russia. “And domestic traffic represents just a bit more than a third of total traffic, so it is not enough to sustain a general recovery,” said Alexandre de Juniac, IATA director general.center_img Figures from the International Air Transport Association have confirmed that passenger demand in September remained highly depressed.Total demand (measured in revenue passenger kilometres or RPKs) was 73 per cent below September 2019 levels.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Hospital pandemic drill reveals major supply challenges

first_img The ICNs on hand during the exercise found that compliance with the infection control guidelines was good, but they also noted plenty of concerns and areas of uncertainty. A few examples included problems with donning and removing PPE, patients being kept waiting while HCWs put on PPE, decontamination of ward equipment such as telephones and door handles, and hand hygiene after contact with inanimate objects. The 24-hour exercise in a British hospital also revealed various other challenges, including that hospital workers lacked confidence in their ability to follow infection control guidelines, felt uncomfortable wearing surgical masks, and felt that wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) hindered communication, according to the report, published online by the Journal of Infection Control. She said she wasn’t surprised by the finding that many workers found the surgical masks uncomfortable. “It’s difficult for staff not used to wearing the things to wear them all shift long,” she said. “Healthcare in a pandemic situation is not simply a case of applying pandemic influenza infection control guidance to current practice; hospitals need to consider changing the way care and services are delivered,” states the report by N. F. Phin of Cheshire and Merseyside Health Protection Unit, Chester, UK, and colleagues. These guidelines “involve major changes to the way care is currently delivered and the use of infection control measures and PPE on a scale far beyond that experienced in the recent past,” Phin and colleagues write. “Few currently employed healthcare workers have experience of a pandemic and the lack of a detailed operational data makes implementation of the current guidance challenging.” The team also recorded traffic through the ward and found that at least 115 different workers made 167 visits during the exercise. “This level of traffic would be highly undesirable during a pandemic, and as a consequence of the exercise, operational assumptions and plans are to be reappraised in order to minimize unnecessary staff movement,” they write. During the exercise, conducted in November 2006, 17 infection control nurses (ICNs) monitored staff compliance with the infection control guidance, gave advice when needed, and recorded issues that arose. The volume of trash is also a concern, said Patrick, who is a board member of the Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). She said hospitals might consider using trash compactors to deal with that, but compactors might cause aerosolization of pathogens, and heavier trash containers might increase injury risk for workers. On the basis of World Health Organization (WHO) guidance at the time, the investigators had expected a much smaller need for basic PPE and a greater need for high-level equipment. “WHO guidance overestimates the use of high-level specialist PPE and underestimates the amount of basic PPE required,” they write. A key finding was that HCWs used far greater than normal quantities of basic PPE during the exercise: about 1,200 pairs of gloves, 650 surgical masks, and 750 disposable aprons. This suggests that during the height of a pandemic, the use of aprons, gloves, and masks would increase 13-fold, 10-fold, and 450-fold, respectively, the report says. “Where do you store all that?” Patrick asked. “Most hospitals, just like grocery stores, don’t have big storerooms of supplies. A lot of places have gone from a 24-hour supply to 72 or 96 hours, but we don’t have stocks and stocks of stuff.” Workers’ perceptionsTwenty-one of the 23 ward staff members completed a questionnaire about the exercise. Among the results: Fourteen (67%) of them found it uncomfortable or very uncomfortable to wear a surgical mask; 17 (81%) said their duties took longer; and 9 (43%) felt that talking with others was more difficult. In addition, three workers reported that wearing a mask seemed to affect their hearing, very likely showing the importance of nonverbal cues in communication. As for respirators, people who have asthma or other respiratory problems find it very difficult to wear them for more than a few minutes, she added. Because of that, her own healthcare system uses powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs), which blow air through a HEPA filter and into a hood worn by the worker. The device has a clear face shield and does not require fit testing. Supporting what some of the staff reported, the investigators also found that “many tasks and routine procedures took much longer than usual, despite the rostering of additional staff; this was particularly obvious at night when the drug round took twice as long as usual to complete.” Basic PPE much more in demandTo assess the operational challenges, the researchers set up their 24-hour exercise on a 29-bed general medical ward that received mostly respiratory and gastrointestinal patients. The staff, including 14 nurses, 5 healthcare assistants, and 4 domestic workers, was briefed in advance on pandemic flu, infection control procedures to be used, and how to don and remove PPE, including FFP3 respirators. Patrick said the British guidelines differ in a couple of respects from those used in her institution. One was that the former do not call for eye protection for HCWs in close contact with infectious patients. Study ‘generalizable’ to US hospitalsMarcia Patrick, RN, MSN, CIC, infection control director with the MultiCare Health System in Tacoma, Wash., called the study very interesting and said the big increase in usage of PPE impressed her as the most important finding. Nov 25, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Hospital workers who followed official infection control guidelines for pandemic influenza for 1 day used 10 times as many gloves as usual, generated three times as much clinical waste, and found that many tasks took longer than normal, according to a new report. Overall, the staff had a good grasp of basic infection control steps, but they were unsure about the extra measures recommended in a pandemic, the report says, adding, “Uncertainty was also evident in participating staff as ICN observers occasionally gave conflicting advice.” Along with the surge in basic PPE used came a major increase in waste generated: 18 48-liter bags, versus four to six bags on a normal day, the report says. “Another good point is that most of the masks and gloves and gowns are made in China or some of those other countries, and the likelihood of a supply shortage [in a pandemic] is enormous,” she added. On the other hand, it says the quantities of high-level PPE used were much lower than expected: 13 gowns, 13 FFP3 respirators, and 13 pairs of goggles. Expecting a much greater need, the team had ordered 500 respirators for the exercise. “I believe it [the study] is generalizable to US facilities, particularly the increased amount of isolation supplies that would be needed in a pandemic,” she told CIDRAP News. See also: “I would want mask and eye protection to be linked—not just used for cough-inducing procedures,” she said. “We have found that requiring masks with eye protection and providing the single-unit items has increased compliance.” Despite the challenges pointed up by the exercise, the staff felt that it increased their confidence about dealing with a flu pandemic, the researchers write. They conclude, “We believe that this is the first simulation of its kind in the UK, and that many hospitals would benefit from undertaking similar exercises in order to gain confidence and understanding of their own operational needs.” British health authorities issued infection control guidance for pandemic flu in October 2005, the report says. The guidelines call for healthcare workers (HCWs) to wear gloves, a plastic apron or gown, and a surgical mask when coming within 3 feet of pandemic flu patients. They recommend the use of an FFP3 respirator (equivalent to a US N-99 respirator, designed to stop 99% of small airborne particles) and eye protection during aerosol-generating procedures. Phin NF, Rylands AJ, Allan J, et al. Personal protective equipment in an influenza pandemic: a UK simulation exercise. J Hosp Infect 2008 (early online publication) [Abstract] Oct 18, 2006, CIDRAP News story “HHS backs respirator use in caring for pandemic flu patients”last_img read more

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