Molly Sims To CoHost StarStudded Fashion Gala For Autism Speaks

first_imgAutism Speaks Southern California presents La Vie En BLUE Fashion Gala, a night of fashion and philanthropy produced by Metropolitan Fashion Week, hosted by Kevin Frazier and Molly Sims.This Parisian-themed evening will feature Zumanity by Cirque Du Soleil costumes designed by French fashion designer Thierry Mugler. Other featured designers include GUESS Kids, David Tupaz Couture, Dalia Macphee, Ron Tomson, Carl Andrada, Erick Bendana, Julie Danforth, Jovani Fashions, Usama Ishtay and Sivalia Couture.Stars such as Vivica A. Fox, Eve, Alicia Machado, Hilary Rhoda, Madison Beer, Shenae Grimes, Keltie Knight and Kristian Alfonso will strut the runway in gorgeous blue evening gowns to be auctioned off, while children on the autism spectrum will model the latest fashions from GUESS Kids.Also highlighting the evening will be an exclusive performance from ZUMANITY by Cirque du Soleil with costumes designed by Thierry Mugler.The gala will also honor two fathers and champions of Autism Speaks’ mission – City National Bank’s SVP Harry Topping Jr. and Untitled Entertainment talent manager Steven Grossman (who will receive the award from The Real’s Jeannie Mai).Stars that have lent their support to La Vie En BLUE’s honorary host committee include Christie Brinkley, Naomi Campbell, Molly Sims, Paris Hilton, Kelly Osbourne, Melissa Rivers, NeNe Leakes, Kelly Rowland, Loni Love and Jeannie Mai.La Vie En BLUE is generously sponsored by the Guess Foundation, City National Bank, CBRE, Paul Attanasio, Common Wealth Partners, Steelcase, Tangram, FX Networks, MK Rice, Gensler, Howard Building Co, Samsung Group, Coca-Cola Company, Two Faced Cosmetics, Urban Decay Cosmetics, Kendra Scott Jewelry, Big Sugar Bakeshop, Porto’s Bakery, Hidden Gardens Florist and The Los Angeles Kings. Entertainment Tonight and The Hollywood Reporter are media sponsors.For more info, click here.last_img read more

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Jackson Browne And Bonnie Raitt Announce Benefit Concert At Standing Rock

first_imgJackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt, Joel Rafael, and Bad Dog will perform a benefit concert on Sunday, November 27 for the Water Protectors on the front line and the Standing Rock community.Jackson Browne And Bonnie Raitt Benefit Concert At Standing Rock To Stand In Solidarity With Standing RockThe concert will be held at Prairie Knights Pavilion in Fort Yates, ND. Turtle Island Storyteller and founder of the Standing Rock Sioux Camp at Sacred Stone Ladonna Brave Bull Allard, and others to be announced, will speak at the concert.The link to purchase tickets is HERE.All gross proceeds from the concert will benefit the Oceti Sakowin Camp.The Oceti Sakowin Camp is a historic gathering of Native nations, friends and allies, from all walks of life standing in solidarity to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline.“Just as we give thanks for our good fortune and the bounty of our lives as Americans, let us thank the Native people who are gathered here at Standing Rock to protect the natural world and defend our place in it,” said Jackson Browne.“I’m proud to be standing in support of the courageous and dedicated Water Protectors at Standing Rock. This movement is growing by the day with solidarity actions happening around the country, yet the media isn’t covering it nearly enough. Our hope is that this concert will help bring more awareness and media attention to the issues being raised at Standing Rock, and to put pressure on The Obama Administration to halt construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline until protection of sacred sites is ensured,” said Bonnie Raitt.“We are honored to have these great artists stand with us!” says Ladonna.Those who can travel to North Dakota are invited to Stand in Solidarity with Standing Rock on Sunday, November 27, 2016 at Prairie Knights Pavilion at 6:30 PM.For more information, and to contribute, please visit www.standingrock.org.last_img read more

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Ricky Gervais Backs AntiFur Campaign

first_imgAnimal Defenders International (ADI) has released undercover footage of a fox on fur farm recovering after electrocution and trying to escape.A fox on a Polish fur farm is dragged from a barren mesh cage by his tail, hung upside down, the fur farmer smacks the fox in the face with an electric probe, forcing the animal to bite onto it in a desperate attempt to defend himself. He is electrocuted and tossed, with a thud, seemingly lifeless, onto a cart.However, as ADI’s hidden cameras, record more animals being killed, the fox begins to stir amongst the other dead foxes, finally slipping off the cart and making a run for it. The swearing farmer finally recaptures the fox and again hangs the animal upside down by a hind leg. But now the fox knows what will happen and tries to avoid the probe, clamping his mouth shut and twisting, as the fur farmer hits him in the face. The fox eventually bites the probe and dies.The new footage demolishes fur industry claims that killing on fur farms is quick, efficient and humane.The video contains graphic images of animal cruelty and can be viewed here.Electrocution is the fur industry standard for killing foxes, the website of a coalition from the Fur industry of America and Canada, entitled “The Truth About Fur”, boldly claims “100% of the animals are dead within 10 seconds”.Comedian Ricky Gervais: “Fashion is a form of escapism for many but for the animals, imprisoned and denied their most basic needs, death is the only escape. It doesn’t have to be this way – save lives by going fur-free and supporting ADI.”ADI President, Jan Creamer: “These animals live miserable lives in extreme confinement and are killed in front of each other. They know what is going to happen and desperately cling to the cage as they are dragged out. One fox regains consciousness after electrocution. He is grabbed, hung upside down and tries to avoid the electric probe, the farmer hits his face with the probe until he bites and is electrocuted.”Each year 110 million animals are killed on fur farms where the animals’ living conditions alone – small, bare, mesh cages – show no regard for the welfare of the animals. Over 15 million foxes are killed in a year, usually for trinkets, trims and accessories but up to 35 foxes can be used to make a fur coat.Examples of botched killings filmed by ADI on the Polish fur farm include:• After electrocution, a fox regains consciousness amongst dead foxes and makes a run for it. He is recaptured. Then, hanging upside down, he tries to avoid the electric probe, so is poked and hit until he bites it. • In another killing on the farm, a fox is clearly still breathing after electrocution and is hung up and electrocuted again. • A conscious fox was left hanging by a back foot, and struggled for nearly two minutes while the farmer answered his phone. • Foxes were heard screaming or yelping when the electric probe went into their mouths; when the animals did not fully bite down, the farmer had to make additional attempts to kill them.Jan Creamer: “Anyone who buys fur, buys cruelty. There is no escaping the terrible lives and horrific deaths of these animals whose beauty is their ticket to a lifetime of suffering and painful death. Fur is a product of pain and terror.”Actress and long-time ADI supporter Joanna Lumley, said: “Be comfortable in your own skin, and not that of a poor defenceless animal caged and killed to provide it. Say no to fur and yes to helping these fashion victims. Please help ADI stop this brutal trade.”Animal loving actor Brian Blessed, said: “Millions of wild animals live on factory farms, bred for the fashion industry. It’s time to kill the suffering, not the animal. Always choose faux and not real fur and support ADI’ in this campaign.”last_img read more

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MOCA Toronto names director of programs

first_img Facebook Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twittercenter_img With the naming today of November Paynter as the director of programs for Toronto’s Museum of Contemporary Art, the unpredictable evolution of the museum’s leadership took another turn. Paynter’s appointment comes seven months after Chantal Pontbriand left MOCA as its first-ever chief executive officer. Pontbriand’s surprising departure had occurred less than eight months after she assumed the newly created position.Paynter joins MOCA from SALT, a Turkish not-for-profit institution based in Istanbul and Ankara. British-born and educated at the Royal College of Art in London, Paynter was the founding associate director of research and programs at SALT from 2011 to 2016.She arrives at her new post in Toronto with the museum in the midst of significant transition. The opening of MOCA’s new home (in rented quarters at Tower Automotive Building, a century-old former factory in the city’s west end) has been delayed from the spring of this year to the fall. Advertisement Login/Register With:last_img read more

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XAVIER DOLAN CUTS JESSICA CHASTAIN FROM UPCOMING MOVIE

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Advertisement “I am disappointed that we didn’t get to reveal the exciting things we crafted together on this one adventure, but life is long, and missed opportunities almost always bode of even greater future collaborations,” he wrote.Chastain also posted a statement on Instagram saying she had heard in advance about her character being cut and the process was “handled with the utmost respect and love.”“I am always impressed with your true commitment to telling a story,” Chastain wrote in her statement, addressing Dolan.“To be an artist in each moment, you move beyond past ideas and expectations. I love you dearly and look forward to our future collaborations in life and art.”Dolan said he’s “beyond happy” with the film and eager to share it with fans.He didn’t mention a release date, but said “the sooner, the better.”The film has a star-studded cast including Natalie Portman, Kit Harington and Susan Sarandon. Jessica Chastain attends The 23rd Annual Critics Awards at Barker Hangar on January 11, 2018 in Santa Monica, California. (MATT WINKELMEYER/GETTY IMAGES) Facebook Login/Register With: Twitter “All sorts of developments unfold during the shooting of a film, as we know. Often, it isn’t before late into a production that it finds its tone . . . It was an extremely difficult decision to make. I feel, toward Jessica, a very sincere love, and a great admiration. The decision was editorial and narrative, in that it has nothing to do with a performance, and everything to do with a character, and the compatibility of its storyline.”Dolan, who has been editing the movie since May, said that Chastain’s villainous character simply did not fit with rest of the film’s pared-down story, but added he hoped to work with her again. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Quebec filmmaker Xavier Dolan says he has cut Oscar-nominated actress Jessica Chastain from his upcoming movie The Death and Life of John F. Donovan.Dolan said in an Instagram post on Sunday evening that he had to rework the first cut of his film — his English-language debut — which was more than four hours long.“We loved every (one) of the assembled scenes, but knew a more profound reflection on the film’s form and focus awaited us,” Dolan wrote.last_img read more

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Murdoch Mysteries wins Golden Screen Award for TV Drama

first_imgTORONTO – (March 9, 2018) – Ahead of this Sunday’s 2018 Canadian Screen Awards Broadcast Gala, the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television (the Canadian Academy) today announced the winners of the 2018 Golden Screen Awards for film and television. The winners in each category will be awarded their statues during the pre-show gala, hosted by Ali Hassan and Sharron Matthews, and recognized in a montage during the broadcast live on CBC on Sunday, March 11 at 8 p.m. (9 p.m. AT/ 9:30 p.m. NT). The awards Gala will also stream globally at cbc.ca/watch and youtube.com/cbc.CBC’s Murdoch Mysteries is the winner of the Golden Screen Award for TV Drama. Murdoch Mysteries airs on CBC and stars Yannick Bisson, Hélène Joy, Jonny Harris and Thomas Craig. It is produced by Shaftesbury.CTV’s The Amazing Race Canada is the winner of the Golden Screen Award for TV Reality Show. Hosted by Jon Montgomery, The Amazing Race Canada airs on CTV and is produced by Insight Production Company Ltd. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement De père en flic 2 is the winner of the Cineplex Golden Screen Award for Feature Film. De père en flic 2 premiered July 13, 2017 in Montreal. The film was directed by Émile Gaudreault, written by Gaudreault, Eric K. Boulianne and Sébastien Ravary, and stars Michel Côté, Louis-José Houde and Karine Vanasse.“The Golden Screen Awards give us an opportunity to highlight Canada’s most popular film and television productions,” said Martin Katz, Chair of the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television. “I hope Canadians continue to be inspired by the high quality television and films we produce, and to enjoy them at home and at the theatre.”The Golden Screen Awards for television is awarded to the highest-rated Canadian television programs in two select categories. Audience estimates are provided by Numeris based on a list of all Canadian television programming (series, limited series and TV Movies) provided by the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television. Analysis is based on Total Canada, P2+, Average Minute Audience during the period of September 1, 2016 – November 15, 2017, original airings (“live plus 7 days”) with 50 per cent or more of the airings occurring during the 2016-17 broadcast season.The Cineplex Golden Screen Award for Feature Film is awarded to the Canadian film with the highest domestic box office..About Academy of Canadian Cinema & TelevisionThe Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television is the largest non-profit professional arts organization in Canada. We are dedicated to recognizing, advocating for and celebrating Canadian talent in the film, television and digital media sectors.Our more than 4,500 members encompass industry icons and professionals, emerging artists and students. Collectively, we deliver professional development programs and networking opportunities that foster industry growth, inclusion and mentorship.The Canadian Academy produces Canadian Screen Week. This annual celebration of excellence in media through a multi-platform, national program of events and celebrations culminates with the Canadian Screen Awards Broadcast Gala live on CBC, Sunday March 11, 2018 at 8 p.m. (9 p.m. AT/ 9:30 p.m. NT).For information on membership and programming visit www.academy.ca..About CBC/Radio-CanadaCBC/Radio-Canada is Canada’s national public broadcaster. Through our mandate to inform, enlighten and entertain, we play a central role in strengthening Canadian culture. As Canada’s trusted news source, we offer a uniquely Canadian perspective on news, current affairs and world affairs. Our distinctively homegrown entertainment programming draws audiences from across the country. Deeply rooted in communities, CBC/Radio-Canada offers diverse content in English, French and eight Indigenous languages. We are leading the transformation to meet the needs of Canadians in a digital world. Facebook Advertisement Twitter Login/Register With: Advertisementlast_img read more

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Prosperity mine resurrection

first_imgAPTN National NewsBritish Columbia Liberal leadership candidate Christy Clark says if chosen leader she would resurrect Taseko Mine’s controversial Prosperity mine project which would drain a lake sacred to area First Nations.Her pledge has again stirred up controversy among B.C.’s First Nations leaders.last_img

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Supreme Court of Canada wont hear Metis rights case from Alberta

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Supreme Court of Canada has refused to hear an appeal involving Metis hunting and fishing rights in Alberta.The Metis Nation of Alberta had filed arguments on behalf of hunter Garry Hirsekorn challenging a lower court ruling restricting Metis hunting rights to Metis settlements in the northern part of the province.The arguments focused on a Supreme Court ruling 10 years ago that granted Ontario Metis hunting rights.Hirsekorn was convicted in 2010 of hunting out of season after he shot a mule deer near the cypress hills in southeastern Alberta.last_img

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Canadas relationship with Indigenous peoples deteriorated over past decade UN report

first_imgAPTN National News OTTAWA–Canada’s relationship with Indigenous peoples has deteriorated over the past decade, a report by the UN rapporteur responsible for investigating the human rights situation of Indigenous peoples.James Anaya, the UN rapporteur on the rights of Indigenous peoples, found that “human rights problems faced by Indigenous peoples in Canada have reached crisis proportions.”The report  also found that the relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples was getting worse.“The relationship between the federal government and Indigenous peoples is strained, perhaps even more so than when the previous special rapporteur visited Canada in 2003,” said the report. “Despite certain positive developments that have occurred since then and the shared goal of improving conditions for Indigenous peoples.”Anaya visited Canada in the fall of 2013, touring communities in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia. He also met with federal officials, including Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt and the RCMP.According to his report, Canada talks the talk of reconciliation, but it doesn’t walk the walk.“The government of Canada has stated a goal of reconciliation, which the special rapporteur heard repeated by numerous government representatives with whom he met,” said the report. “Yet, even in this context, in recent years, Indigenous leaders have expressed concern that progress toward this goal has been undermined by actions of the government that limit or ignore the input of Indigenous governments and representatives.”Anaya found that the economic conditions of Indigenous peoples has remained unchanged over the past decade.“The most jarring manifestation of these human rights problems is the distressing socio-economic conditions of Indigenous peoples in a highly developed country,” wrote Anaya. “Although in 2004, the previous special rapporteur recommended that Canada intensify its measures to close the human development indicator gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians in health care, housing, education, welfare and social services, there has been no change in the gap.”Aboriginal Affairs Minster Bernard Valcourt, however, viewed the report as validating Canada’s handling of Indigenous issues.“The report published by the special rapporteur today acknowledges that, while many challenges remain, many positive steps have been taken by the Government of Canada to improve the overall well-being and prosperity of Aboriginal people in Canada,” said Valcourt, in a statement. “Our numerous laws, policies and programs aimed at addressing Aboriginal peoples’ concerns allow for a positive collaboration with Canada’s Aboriginal and Northern communities as we work together on shared priorities and towards a renewed relationship built on reconciliation and trust.”Anaya’s report also calls on Canada not to push through natural resource projects unless there is “free, prior and informed consent.” The report lists several projects which face concerns from impact First Nations communities, including Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline project, the Alberta tar sands and shale gas exploration near Elsipogtog First Nation.The report recommends that Ottawa extend the Truth and Reconciliations Commission’s mandate for as long as it needs to finish its work and provide compensation to all residential school survivors.“The government should ensure that the mandate of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is extended for as long as may be necessary for it to complete its work,” said the report. “And should consider establishing means of reconciliation and redress for survivors of all types of residential schools.”Ottawa has refused to compensate former residential school survivors who went to day schools, were taught in sanitariums or were boarded out.In his report, Anaya criticized Ottawa’s treatment of the Mohawks of Akwesasne who are forced to go through customs checkpoints without ever leaving Canada. Akwesasne straddles the Canada-U.S. border.“The federal government should work with Indigenous peoples in international border areas, in particular the Mohawk nation of Akwesasne, to remove barriers to their free movement within their traditional territories,” said the report.The report also calls on Ottawa to call an inquiry into the high number of murdered and missing Indigenous women.news@aptn.caDownload (PDF, Unknown)last_img read more

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Smithers Highway of Tears gathering another roadblock or road to bus line

first_imgThe Canadian PressVICTORIA — Community leaders along British Columbia’s notorious Highway of Tears meet this week to debate the highly charged issue of improving safety along the route that cuts across the centre of the province.Eighteen women have been murdered or disappeared along Highway 16 and adjacent routes since the 1970s.First Nations’ leaders and the Opposition New Democrats say government roadblocks in the form of endless meetings over transportation solutions that go nowhere must come down to improving safety.Up to 100 people are expected to be in Smithers to review locally developed transportation options along the 750-kilometre highway corridor, but Transportation Minister Todd Stone won’t attend and said he would leave the discussion up to local officials.Stone describes the Tuesday meeting as information gathering and non-political.North Coast New Democrat MLA Jennifer Rice, who represents the Prince Rupert area, wanted to go to the meeting, but said she wasn’t invited.“I understand the chief administrative officers (from communities) are invited because those are the practical people. Minister Stone is always talking about practical solutions, and I guess those are the practical people who implement practical things.”Representatives from 23 First Nations along the corridor, municipal governments and the B.C. government will attend the day-long meeting.A government statement said the gathering will review previous community transportation reports, including a 2006 report that called for bus service between communities and the 2012 Missing Women Commission of Inquiry that recommended enhanced transportation in the area.Regional politician Bill Miller said many agree that Highway 16 is too geographically challenged for a region-wide bus service, but there’s concern about government stalling.“Sometimes it seems like we’ve just been put on a treadmill,” said Miller, an elected member of the Bulkley-Nechako Regional District. “We have some cost-effective and efficient solutions.”He said a more workable system would link neighbours like Vanderhoof, Fort St. James and Fraser Lake and would ease safety concerns for those who have to travel the route.“The underlying issue is vulnerability of women in general, First Nations women in specific.”But he said local governments need the province to help communities get the locally driven transportation system.“We’re going to send some people to the symposium in Smithers and hopefully get them to understand that this is a significant issue.”Stone said he agrees with some locals that a shuttle-bus service along the entire route isn’t practical. But the NDP said that recently released documents contradict Stone and highlight the concerns of local officials who say a bus service should be considered.“A lot of people are feeling this is past due and this is time to take action,” said Rice.Among the more than 600 pages of recently released government documents are bus service estimates, pegging costs of a six-day-a-week, Prince Rupert to Prince George bus at less than $1 million annually.Finance Minister Mike de Jong said last week he expects to deliver a quarterly financial update that includes improved financial forecasts, fuelling speculation the government has some money for targeted initiatives.Stone recently acknowledged the highway issue could be swept up in a call by the federal Liberal government for an inquiry into Canada’s murdered and missing women.An RCMP report last year stated nearly 1,200 Indigenous women were murdered or went missing between 1980 and 2012.last_img read more

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Helena Woods story A journey to healing

first_imgBrittany HobsonKaryn PuglieseAPTN NewsEight years ago a family tragedy changed Helena Wood’s life forever, and set the course for a nearly decade-long journey of healing and recovery.On Feb. 26, 2010 Helena’s 15-year-old daughter Cassandra Wood died by suicide in their home community of St. Theresa Point. Her body was found a day later in a garage near the community’s high school. Helena believes witnessing years of domestic violence in the home was too much for Cassandra.“I’m not going to go through this again. I’m not going to lose another daughter because of him,” she told APTN News. “He doesn’t matter to me. What matters is my kid’s future. Giving them the best life I could possibly give them.In August 2010, six months after Cassandra’s death, Helena fled to Winnipeg with her kids. She called a local shelter asking for help getting the family. St. Theresa Point is a remote community in northern Manitoba. During the summer it is only accessible by plane and in the winter people can drive in and out via a winter road. The shelter paid for Helena and her kids to be flown to Winnipeg.She eventually settled in community of Steinbach located 58 km southeast of Winnipeg.It is here where she had to face some harsh realities when it came to her daughter.“I regret not knowing her. Even though she was reaching out to me I turned her away because of the domestic violence,” she said from her home in Steinbach.“I was too much concentrating on my abuse. Trying to survive every day.”Helena and Cassandra’s father began dating while they were in high school. Helena became pregnant with Cassandra at the age of 16. She married Cassandra’s father when she was 18. The violence started early on in their relationship. APTN has decided not to publish his name at Helena’s request.APTN obtained a copy of a special investigative report done by Manitoba’s Children’s Advocate Office outlining events leading up to and after Cassandra’s death.According to the report Island Lake First Nations Family Services (ILFNFS) first intervened in December 2008 when Cassandra told local health workers she didn’t want to go home because of the violence. Helena and Cassandra’s father met with ILFNFS, health services and justice representatives. They were concerned marital problems were affecting the children.The agency was supposed to follow up the next week but there is no documentation indicating that meeting took place, according to the report.In September 2009 Cassandra went to live with her maternal grandparents because of the violence. She remained there off and on until her death.With the abuse came the drinking. Helena use alcohol to cope with the abuse. She says it helped numb her feelings. That dependency followed her, but this time she was drinking to deal with Cassandra’s death.Cassandra’s siblings, Jewel and Austin Wood, were trying cope with their sister’s death. Their relationship with Helena began to deteriorate because of Helena’s addictions. Helena contacted child and family services hoping to get counseling for her kids and herself. The agency responded by apprehending the kids. Jewel decided to move back to St. Theresa Point to live with her father. Austin was placed in another home.For Helena that was her rock bottom. She worked tirelessly to get her kids back. She wrote three letters to the agency pleading for help to kick her addictions. In one she wrote, “I feel like I’ve been mistreated and victimized by the system again. And yet that was the whole point I came down here to get the proper help I need for me and my children. Instead just got ignored and being misunderstood.”After submitting the letters to the agency she was assigned a new caseworker. She was finally told the kids would be returned if she got clean.“I went to the emergency. I wanted to quit on my own but I knew I couldn’t because of my body. Then I went to the crisis stabilization unit over there,” said Helena.Doctors told her symptoms from withdrawal could be fatal if she quit cold turkey.It’s been eight years since Helena left the community. She has now been sober for nearly two years. She credits her sobriety to the support of her parents, a strong group of friends and rediscovering her faith.“I go to church and I go to a bible study group. I call them my family but they’re my friends. That’s where my help is and that’s how I finally healed,” she said.Both Jewel and Austin have since aged out of the child welfare system. Two years ago Jewel gave birth to Helena’s first grandchild – a baby boy named Anthony. Last summer Jewel and Anthony moved to Steinbach to live with Helena. Shortly after Austin followed.Helena Wood, far right, with her daughter Jewel Wood and son Austin Wood.It may have taken six years but Helena finally has her family back. Much of her focus has been staying clean and in control of her life.“There’s times I want to quit because it’s exhausting. But when I have times like that I look at my kids. I have to go on for these children,” said Helena. “My grandson I look at him and [wonder] who’s going to take care of him. I have to make a safer, brighter future for him.”When Helena is plagued with doubt or exhaustion she leans on Marlene Schindler for support. The two met shortly after Helena arrived in Steinbach and have remained close since. Schindler watched as Helena worked on rebuilding her life.“She can look her kids in the face and never be ashamed because she did what she could do and did it to the best of her ability and she never quit,” said Schindler.Approximately 10 per cent of the population in Steinbach identifies as Indigenous, according to a 2016 census report. Many Indigenous foster kids are being placed in non-Indigenous homes.Helena saw this and decided to team up with the Steinbach Arts Council to facilitate workshops on traditional culture. She invited foster families and members from the community to a tea and bannock event last fall. It is here where she spoke openly about Cassandra’s death for the first time.Helena wants to tell people about her losses and what she has learned from her past.She also hopes the events can keep kids connected to their culture.“I know what’s going on in the system. I see a lot of foster kids here,” Helena told APTN after the event. “They’re lost and there’s nothing here. What are they going to learn? They need a sense of belonging.”Helena Wood making bannock at an event she recently organized.This is all volunteer work. Helena says physical pain from the years of abuse prevent her from working full-time. She has chronic back pain and cannot stand for long periods of time.She is also living with post-traumatic stress disorder. Every time she goes to swallow something her throat closes up and she begins to choke. Solid foods are now blended together to form a puree.Helena says doctors have ruled out any permanent damage. She now must re-train her body and brain on how to eat.While she cannot work right now, Helena longs for more.“I want to be a therapist,” said Helena. “I want to go back to school. That’s my next step.”She has her sights set on Providence University College – a Christian university located in the rural community of Otterburne, Man. There’s still some logistics to work out like paying for the schooling and transportation, but with this goal in mind Helena feels she finally on the right path.Judy Klassen has been by Helena’s side since before the abuse started. The two are cousins but in their culture they refer to each other as sisters. Klassen sheltered Helena and her kids when they first arrived in Steinbach. She sees Helena’s journey as a story of redemption and victory.“To see her still standing there. Still trying to take care of her kids. To be still standing it’s quite an accomplishment,” said Klassen.Helena wants to educate others about domestic violence. Part of that includes honouring Cassandra’s life and what it could have been.From her home in Steinbach she imagines Cassandra would have gotten married and started a family after she graduated high school.Earlier this month Helena visited the spot where Cassandra’s body was found in St. Theresa Point. She has visited this site a handful of times since her death.But, this time is different. This time she is ready to move forward.“I have accepted it. I wasn’t ready to face it but now I am.”bhobson@aptn.calast_img read more

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Government afraid to recognize implement Indigenous rights says WilsonRaybould

first_imgJustin BrakeAPTN NewsJody Wilson-Raybould says the federal government has cold feet when it comes to recognizing and implementing Indigenous rights.The former Liberal justice minister and attorney general told leaders from the First Nations Justice Council in Richmond, B.C. Wednesday that despite Prime Minister Trudeau’s promises of reconciliation, “the federal government has fallen back once again into a pattern of trying to manage the problem of Indigenous peoples and making incremental limited shifts instead of transforming the status quo.“In my view, it is never appropriate or proper to have as a goal managing the challenges and the byproducts of colonialism,” she told the room of almost 200 gathered for the first annual First Nations Provincial Justice Forum.Wilson-Raybould, who was kicked out of the Liberal caucus alongside former Indigenous services minister Jane Philpott earlier this month after the two spoke out against senior government officials’ behaviour related to the SNC-Lavalin affair, said a directive she issued on civil litigation for Indigenous peoples and her work toward an Indigenous rights framework were met with significant resistance within cabinet.She said while the government is making small and important strides on things like Indigenous policy reform, fundamental change is required, including “the basic Crown recognition of Indigenous title, rights and governments.”Jody Wilson-Raybould says she met resistance within government from “some, who importantly did not and perhaps still do not realize that uncertainty, conflict and unpredictability arise as the denial of rights, not because of their recognition.” Laurie Hamelin/APTNFollowing Trudeau’s Feb. 14, 2018 speech in the House of Commons, when he promised sweeping legislative reform on the recognition and implementation of Indigenous rights, Wilson-Raybould said she thought the changes would “happen imminently.”“As you all know this has not occurred, and I fear we may have temporarily fallen back into a less audacious, less meaningful conversation and mode of work that, while perhaps more comfortable, will not achieve the transformative space that is required,” she said.The former Assembly of First Nations regional chief for B.C. praised First Nations’ work on justice reform in their own communities and said the need for a directive to reform how the government handles civil litigation involving Indigenous peoples “speaks volumes to the much more foundational challenges we still face.“The patterns of perpetual, expensive and seemingly endless litigation that we’ve fallen into is a symptom of a much deeper dilemma rooted in the history of our country and about how the law and the justice system has operated,” she said.On the issue of Indigenous rights, Wilson-Raybould said there was a fear that recognizing and implementing those rights could have negative economic consequences.“Some, who importantly did not and perhaps still do not realize that uncertainty, conflict and unpredictability arise as the denial of rights, not because of their recognition,” she said.Philpott also addressed delegates Wednesday, praising their work on justice reform for First Nations peoples and emphasizing the need to continue pushing “for the full implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as well as the [Truth and Reconciliation Commission] calls to action.”Jane Philpott and Jody Wilson-Raybould pose for a photo with members of the B.C. First Nations Justice Council. Justin Brake/APTN.Following the speeches the justice forum held an Honouring Ceremony for Philpott and Wilson-Raybould.Forum Chair Doug White called the women “two remarkable individuals…[who] have demonstrated with great clarity that it doesn’t matter what caucus you’re in, what party you’re in, whether you’re a minister or not, that what we need and what we crave in these kinds of defining moments is clarity of leadership, purity of resolve and commitment to basic principles, the rule of law — that we can find a principled way through to craft a different future.”Following their speeches at the @BCFNJC provincial justice forum in Richmond, B.C. Wednesday, @Puglaas and @janephilpott were honoured in ceremony. pic.twitter.com/4LGZ2GhR4L— Justin Brake (@JustinBrakeNews) April 25, 2019Addressing the former cabinet ministers and the delegation in a pre-taped video message, Grand Chief Stewart Philip of the Union of B.C. Indian Chief noted what Wilson-Raybould and Philpott have experienced in Ottawa represents “a very dark underside to the federal government which has characterized government through the colonization and neocolonial period.“We’re so proud that both Jody and Jane stood up to that, spoke out publicly, were certainly on the right side of history,” he said.“On behalf of the Okanagan Nation we want to express our deep gratitude on behalf of our children, our grandchildren, and future generations. You’ve done a tremendous service to the Indigenous Peoples of this country, you’ve set a very high standard, and you’ve inspired our people from coast to coast to coast.”jbrake@aptn.ca@justinbrakenewslast_img read more

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Optimism in Iraq fuels revived interest in classic cars

first_imgBAGHDAD – When Iraqi forces drove Islamic State militants out of eastern Mosul a year ago, Nashwan Shakir Mahmoud raced back to his home, hoping that his red and white 1955 Chevrolet coupe had survived three years of war and upheaval.When he saw that it had only suffered light damage from a mortar shell that landed nearby, he was overjoyed. “I had an unspeakable feeling, I sighed in relief when saw it,” he said.He spent 10 days carrying out his own repairs and then drove it all the way back to Baghdad, a 13-hour journey that would have taken four in a modern car. “When I reached Baghdad,” he said, “people were stopping me in the streets to take pictures and videos. It was like a dream to me and to the people.”The 49-year-old father of six is part of a small community of vintage and classic car aficionados who are hoping to rekindle their passion now that the war against the Islamic State group is over. For many, the cars remind them of happier times in Iraq, before decades of war and chaos, which they hope are finally coming to an end.“These cars have something spiritual that lets you feel the happiness of the good old days,” said Mahmoud, who also owns a 1964 GMC pickup. The pickup is in a mechanic’s garage in Mosul’s Old City, in an unsecured area cordoned off by security forces.Mahmoud had two other classic cars — a 1957 Dodge Coronet and a 1967 Dodge pickup — but U.S. soldiers towed them away in 2006 after warning him against parking them on the street without getting them repaired, saying militants could use them to conceal roadside bombs. He said he cried when they were taken away.Car enthusiasts and collectors, even car clubs in various countries, make a distinction based on a model’s age, with “vintage” cars considered to be those from the period of 1919 to 1930. Models after that are usually classified as “classic” cars and anything over 50 years of age is called “antique.”Iraq’s vintage and classic cars date back to the period between the discovery of oil in the 1920s and the booming 1970s, when the country was awash in petroleum wealth and boasted some of the finest roads in the region.Much of that infrastructure was destroyed in the Iran-Iraq war in the 1980s and the 1990 Gulf War. The sanctions in the 1990s made it difficult to secure spare parts. In the chaotic years after the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, many collectors kept their cars hidden or locked up, while the daily bombings, and the blast walls and barbed wire that sprouted across Baghdad and other cities, took the pleasure out of driving.Now, many of those barriers have come down, and some collectors feel more comfortable showing off their treasures.Saad al-Nuaimi, 65, has parked six classic models in front of his coffee shop in Baghdad’s northern Azamiyah neighbourhood, including green and blue 1954 Chevrolet Bel Airs and two Townson cars from mid 1960s. Three others, including a 1952 Chevrolet and a 1959 Townson, are being repaired.“When you feel secure, you have the guts to get money out of your pocket to enjoy such beauties,” he said.Many Iraqis from war-battered areas are desperate to sell old cars, and as Iraqi forces have driven IS back over the past three years, more and more models have appeared on the market, al-Nuaimi said. His latest acquisition was a badly damaged maroon 1952 Chevrolet from Salahuddin province, where IS was driven out in 2015.He restores the cars himself, ordering spare parts from Europe and the United States.The Iraqi government keeps its own trove of vintage and classic cars, including a rare 1904 Jeep Levon and luxury models used by the Hashemite monarchy from 1921 until 1958, including a 1936 Mercedes-Benz that was a gift from Adolf Hitler. Others belonged to Uday, the notoriously brutal playboy son of Saddam Hussein.Some have had their body work restored but do not have working engines, while others are in very poor condition.The collection is stored in a garage for safe-keeping and is only rarely exhibited to the public. Adil al-Ardawi, the vintage and classic car expert in charge of the royal collection, says at least 1,000 troops were assigned to protect the cars when they were used in a parade last year to mark the 100th anniversary of Baghdad’s al-Rashid Street.Ahmad Shukor, a 39-year-old engineer who runs a Facebook page devoted to documenting Iraq’s vintage and classic cars, says only around 100 remain nationwide. He says a third were in Mosul, and that many of them may have been damaged or destroyed.He’s now in the final stages of opening a showroom in the central city of Najaf. The owners of more than 60 cars have agreed to display them there when the showroom opens in the coming months.“We want to prove that Iraq is not done yet,” he said.___Follow Sinan Salaheddin on Twitter at https://twitter.com/sinansm .___This story was corrected to show the distinction car collectors make, with ‘vintage’ cars being those pre-dating 1930 while ‘classic’ cars are models after that period.last_img read more

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Maduros cryptocurrency genius once pushed US sanctions

first_imgCARACAS, Venezuela – A chief strategist of Venezuela’s government-backed cryptocurrency is a former U.S. congressional intern who once organized protests against the same socialist administration he’s now helping to circumvent U.S. financial sanctions.Gabriel Jimenez, 27, was catapulted to something of tech stardom in Venezuela last month when he stood alongside President Nicolas Maduro and two Russian businessmen on national TV signing a contract to position the petro, as the fledgling currency is known, among international investors.“It’s a company founded and led by young Venezuelan geniuses, boys and girls of Venezuela, who have one of the most technologically advanced blockchain companies in the world,” a beaming Maduro said at the petro’s unveiling, referring to Jimenez’s company, The Social Us.It was a remarkable reinvention for Jimenez.Maduro has repeatedly hailed the petro, the world’s first state-backed digital currency, as a way to “overcome the financial blockade” by the Trump administration that prevents his cash-strapped government from issuing new debt. On Monday, the Trump administration banned Americans from dealing in Venezuelan cyrptocurrencies benefiting the government.But Jimenez until recently had been agitating for the very same actions to punish Venezuela’s leader for jailing his opponents and destroying the oil-rich economy.A lawyer by training who describes himself as an “innovation enthusiast,” Jimenez spent several years working at a Dominican Republic-based bank where his father was a top manager. The bank collapsed in 2014 and his father was among several Venezuelan executives charged by the Caribbean nation with defrauding depositors of $30 million.After college Jimenez also started travelling to the U.S. for English and summer graduate classes at Harvard and George Mason Universities. In 2013, he started The Social Us, registering the company in Florida, as a webpage and app developer.In 2014, Jimenez worked five months as an intern in Washington for Miami Republican Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, one of Maduro’s fiercest critics. A handwritten survey he filled out upon being hired, a copy of which was provided by her office, listed in broken English that his goals for the internship were gaining “knowledge and experience about the defence of democracy.”Colleagues remember him as a spirited anti-government crusader who helped organize a caravan, known as the Trip For Freedom, in which thousands of Venezuelan exiles travelled by bus to Washington to pressure the Obama administration to slap sanctions on Maduro’s government. In photos of the event, he can be seen standing on a podium with Ros-Lehtinen at the Capitol addressing supporters in front of an American flag and photos of Venezuelan students allegedly tortured by security forces.Now his former boss thinks he or anyone else behind the petro should be considered for sanctions too.“Gabriel came to our office and said he wanted to learn how to support freedom and democracy,” Ros-Lehtinen said in a statement. “Instead, it appears he is using the freedoms that the United States provided him in order to help advance the Maduro regime’s attempts to consolidate power and destroy Venezuela’s democratic institutions. Those who work to support the Maduro regime and provide it a financial lifeline have chosen their lot and should expect to face the full consequences of turning against their people.”Jimenez in an interview defended his work for the government as serving a greater, non-political purpose: to empower Venezuelans struggling to feed themselves amid four-digit inflation.He said his work on what would become the petro began when he returned to Venezuela in 2015 and banded together with other tech entrepreneurs to design a digital currency. The group then looked to partner with the government in the hopes of bringing Venezuelans’ underground trading in cryptocurrencies out from the shadows and into legal circulation. At the time, bitcoin miners faced the threat of arrest or extortion by government agents.If the petro takes off, he says, Venezuelans will be able to freely exchange their worthless bolivars for a more stable currency, giving them a chance to raise capital and save. Currently the only way for the majority of Venezuelans to get around strict currency controls imposed in 2003 is to buy hard currency in the illegal black market.“This is about providing oxygen to people, not a government,” Jimenez said in an interview at the bustling Caracas office of The Social Us, where a dozen young programmers scrawled code in pink markers on glass windows overlooking a verdant valley and busily designed promotional materials for the petro.It’s a trade-off that many in Venezuela’s burgeoning blockchain community — almost all of them ideologically opposed to the government — are willing to accept.Still, there’s no denying the government will be the first and perhaps biggest beneficiary.This month, Maduro said the government had received commitments from investors to purchase $5 billion worth of the cryptocurrency during the pre-sale phase that culminates this week. If those materialize into actual sales, it would be a windfall equivalent to more than half of Venezuela’s dollar reserves — money the government is desperately clutching onto as it juggles re-paying billions in defaulted bonds while trying to eradicate widespread shortages.However, members of the U.S. Congress are pushing for a robust response, fearing that other nations under U.S. sanctions such as Iran and Russia could emulate Venezuela’s example, or that the petro could be used by criminal networks or corrupt officials to launder money.Of the two Russians who also signed agreements with the government to help develop the petro one, Denis Druzhkov, CEO of a company called Zeus Trading, was fined $31,000 and barred from trading for three years by the Chicago Mercantile Exchange for fraudulent trading in futures’ contracts. The other, Fedor Bogorodskiy, lives in Uruguay and was described by the government as director of a company, Aerotrading, whose website consists of a single home page with no company information.Neither would comment on their work with the Venezuelan government. But in response to the request for comment, an email signed by “Zeus Team” said that Druzkhov had been invited to Venezuela as an expert and Zeus is not working on the project. It also said that as part of Druzhkov’s settlement with the Mercantile Exchange in 2014, he did not admit to any rule violations.On Monday, President Trump signed an executive order immediately banning all use by Americans of Venezuelan digital currencies, coins or token issued on behalf of the Venezuelan government.A senior administration official told journalists Monday that while the U.S. can’t block Venezuela from developing the petro, the global reach of the American financial system means its ban will have far-reaching consequences around the world and may force other countries to follow suit.Sen. Bob Menendez, who as the top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee has led the effort to combat Venezuela’s use of cryptocurrencies, applauded the move.“Beyond sanctions evasion, the Petro was hand-tailored to perpetuate the money laundering and plundering of public resources that has tragically led Venezuela to economic ruin.” He said in a statement.Jimenez, whose preference for sneakers and jeans exude a sort of nerd esthetic not unlike his entrepreneurial role models in Silicon Valley, said he never intended to help circumvent U.S. sanctions. He also argues that the petro — a financial product that doesn’t generate interest or have a payback schedule like a bond — doesn’t qualify as the sort of debt instrument the Trump administration had been targeting.Instead, he talks of “democratizing” access to global financial system for struggling entrepreneurs and decentralizing Venezuela’s government-run foreign exchange system, which many blame for the economy’s depressed state.“We can’t just sit here with our arms crossed, with all that we, our friends and our family are going through,” he said. “Doing nothing would be irresponsible.”—Follow Goodman on Twitter: https://twitter.com/APjoshgoodmanlast_img read more

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CEO lawyer granted bail pending appeal in blockbuster Knowledge House fraud

first_imgHALIFAX – The mastermind and the enforcer of a sophisticated multimillion-dollar stock market scheme have been granted bail, a day after being sentenced to prison for conspiracy and fraud in one of the most complex cases of white collar crime in Nova Scotia history.Daniel Potter, the former CEO of the defunct tech firm Knowledge House, and former lawyer Blois Colpitts were released Thursday pending the outcome of an appeal.The disgraced executives were found guilty in March of conspiracy to manipulate the firm’s share price and carrying out fraudulent activities in a regulated securities market.Nova Scotia Court of Appeal Justice Cindy Bourgeois signed the bail orders after imposing multiple conditions, including requiring them to hand over their passports, remain in the country and report weekly to police.They have also each entered into a recognizance in the amount of $100,000, with family friends agreeing to act as sureties.The businessmen, who appeared somewhat weary after a night in jail, agreed to the release conditions.Crown attorney James Martin told the court Potter and Colpitts did not pose a flight risk, and that there was no concern they would commit further offences.On Wednesday, Nova Scotia Supreme Court Justice Kevin Coady sentenced Potter, 66, to five years and Colpitts, 55, to 4 1/2 years.In his decision, the judge said “there is virtually no risk that either Mr. Potter or Mr. Colpitts will reoffend.”Meanwhile, the court set aside eight days in September 2019 for the appeal, though the matter is expected to return to court on Aug. 23 of this year to deal with procedural issues in the complicated case.Defence lawyer Jane O’Neill asked if the appeal book, which would include a transcript of the 44-day trial and all the documentary evidence, could be submitted in an electronic format.“The trial transcripts alone are 22,000 pages, the exhibits are in the tens of thousands of pages,” she told the court, adding that — given several hard copies would be required — “I’m not sure there’s enough real estate in this building to hold all of those books.”The trial began in November 2015 and heard from 75 witnesses over more than 160 court days, and 184 exhibits were received including thousands of documents.The jail terms handed down to Potter and Colpitts this week came nearly 17 years after the e-learning company’s dramatic collapse.Knowledge House, the once high-flying Halifax technology darling, developed software the company promised would revolutionize the elementary, high school and post-secondary education systems.The co-conspirators used multiple manipulative techniques to prop up the firm’s share price, including using margin accounts to dominate the buy-side of the market, suppressing sales and “high closing” the stock, or entering orders late in the trading day to boost the closing share price.“Mr. Potter was the silver-tongued mastermind, the architect of the conspiracy, who exerted his influence to manipulate and control other shareholders,” Coady said in his decision.“He dictated who could sell shares, when they could sell, and how much they could sell.”Meanwhile, the judge described Colpitts as “the enforcer” who used his position as counsel “to threaten legal action against anyone who might derail the conspirators’ efforts.”Coady said Colpitts provided legal advice in support of the conspiracy as well as negotiated investment deals and prepared legal documentation knowing that the market price for Knowledge House was being manipulated.The tech company traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange before what the judge described as “the house of cards” collapsed in August 2001, sending Knowledge House stock plummeting to 33 cents a share from $5.10.Though the Crown had estimated the fraud was about $86 million, Coady said he would not put a specific dollar figure on the scheme, instead calling it a “large scale multimillion-dollar fraud.”last_img read more

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Amazon plans to open new distribution centre in Edmonton area hire 600

first_imgNISKU, Alta. — Online retail giant Amazon.com Inc. is opening a new distribution centre in Leduc County, just south of Edmonton, with plans to create 600 full-time jobs by 2020.The e-commerce company says the approximately 92,900-square-metre (one-million-square-foot) centre in Nisku, Alta., will be the company’s 11th distribution facility in Canada, and its second in Alberta.It already operates a similar facility in Rocky View County in southern Alberta, where it employs more than 1,500 full-time workers.Amazon’s other fulfillment facilities are located in British Columbia and Ontario.The Seattle-based company says workers at the new centre will be responsible for picking, packing and shipping larger items such as outdoor equipment, patio furniture and bicycles.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Netflix criticized for yanking Patriot Act episode in Saudi

first_imgDUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Netflix is facing criticism for pulling an episode from viewing in Saudi Arabia of American comedian Hasan Minhaj’s “Patriot Act” that criticized the kingdom’s crown prince.Minhaj used his second episode to lambast the prince over the killing of writer Jamal Khashoggi and the Saudi-led war in Yemen.The Financial Times first reported that Netflix yanked the episode from streaming in Saudi Arabia last week after Saudi officials informed the streaming service that its content violated cyber-crime laws in the kingdom.Rights group Amnesty International said Saudi Arabia’s censorship of Netflix is “further proof of a relentless crackdown on freedom of expression.”Netflix told the FT it strongly supports artistic freedom worldwide and only removed the episode after it received a legal request and to comply with local law.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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EU court rules annuls regulator move to block UPSTNT merger

first_imgBRUSSELS — The European Union’s top court says a decision by anti-trust regulators to block a merger between U.S. delivery giant UPS and Dutch firm TNT must be annulled.The European Court of Justice confirmed Wednesday a lower court finding that UPS’s rights to defence were infringed by the European Commission, which polices competition issues.The Luxembourg-based ECJ says the blocking decision should be annulled if UPS can show that “it would have had the opportunity better to defend itself” if it had full access to Commission analysis of the merger.The Commission said the planned merger would restrict express deliveries of small packages in Europe by reducing the number of players in the market, and so drive up prices.But the EU’s General Court annulled that decision last March.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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No Federal funding included in Budget to help the Oil and Gas

first_imgCALGARY, A.B. – Oilpatch observers say there is nothing in the new federal budget to deal with Canada’s competitive disadvantage with the United States in oil and gas.Statistics Canada says capital spending to extract oil and gas will fall for a fourth straight year, with the biggest declines projected to be in the oilsands sector.Hardest hit will be Alberta, but spending will also be down in Newfoundland and Labrador, B.C. and Saskatchewan. CIBC economist Avery Shenfeld says the numbers are falling because big projects are wrapping up and not being replaced.He says companies are seeing bottlenecks in the ability to get a product to the market and a lighter regulatory environment in the U.S.Ottawa says more analysis is necessary before considering tax cuts to match the U-S, which announced in December it would drop its federal corporate tax rate to 21 percent from 35 percent.University of Calgary tax expert Jack Mintz says Canada had a tax advantage over the U-S until recently but that has evaporated.(THE CANADIAN PRESS)last_img read more

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Honouring women for their remarkable work

first_imgTo honour women for their accomplishments and leadership roles in various categories, Garnet and Gold organised ‘Women of Influence Award 2019’, at Amour Convention and Resorts, Gurugram. The event was held on the occasion of International Women’s Day.The evening began with lighting of lamps by Dr Rajshri Singh, IGP State Crime Branch, IGP Traffic and Highway Haryana, who was invited as the chief guest at the event. Following Ganesh Vandana, the awards were distributed for different categories. The event which was attended by delegates and bureaucrats of Gurugram also witnessed some cultural and artistic performance. Apart from Dr Rajshri, Bollywood Star Yashpal Sharma also graced the event with his presence along with his mother and wife. Anjali Gopalan, human rights and animal rights activist; Neeti Kaushik, Principal cum Director of Mount Olympus School; Narendra Bhaskar, Channel Promotion Head India News; Akash K Agrawal, renowned fashion designer; Tammanna Singh, MD Uber Lux; Sudhanshu Bahuguna, Music Expert; Dr Arjumand Zaidi, Human Right Activist; Veneet Gandhi, founder and CEO of Twinkcraft media and founder of Indian idol academy Delhi were also present with Dr Roma Kapoor, Senior Consultant Clinical Psychologist. Women who were awarded at the event included Aarti Kapur, Achla Bhardwaj,, Anu Yadav, Anusha Srinivasan Iyer, Deepti Dhoot, Devangi Dalal, Dipikaa Bhatia, Kirti Sachdeva, Manisha Yadava, Meenakshi M Singh, Mehak Gupta Grover, Monika Khanna, among others. An initiative by Jacqueline Jindal, Director of Garnet and Gold, celebrates sheer will and spirit of women who broke the barrier of inequality, patriarchy and stereotypes. It envisions not only to honor the women for their remarkable work but also inspire and motivate women across the nation to break out of the cocoon and fly.last_img read more

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