Foo Fighters Invite ‘Kiss Guy’ On Stage For A Jam In Austin [Watch]

first_imgDave Grohl invited an audience member dressed like a member of KISS to join Foo Fighters on stage during last night’s show at the Austin360 Amphitheater in Austin, TX. The man, who neglected to share his name with the band, was affectionately dubbed “Kiss Guy” by Grohl before diving into a jammed out rendition of “Monkey Wrench”. Kiss Guy didn’t have any trouble living up to the moment, making for a very entertaining impromptu sit-in. He even brought his own pick to the show, so maybe he knew he was destined for a legendary night. Judging by the crowd reaction—they began chanting his “name” after the nearly 7-minute tune ended—he earned the high praise Grohl threw his way.Foo Fighters feat. Kiss Guy – “Monkey Wrench”[Video: vanebud]Yesterday’s show also featured some other treats, including covers of Queen‘s “Under Pressure” and Alice Cooper‘s “Under My Wheels”, and a medley that included parts of Queen’s “Another One Bites The Dust”, Rush‘s “YYZ”, John Lennon‘s “Imagine”, Van Halen‘s “Jump”, and The Ramones‘ “Blitzkrieg Bop”. It also marked the second time in the past year that Foo Fighters have invited a fan from the audience to join them on stage.[H/T – JamBase]last_img read more

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Anderson .Paak Releases New Single “Bubblin” With Over-The-Top Music Video

first_imgEarlier this year, Anderson .Paak promised fans not one, but two albums in 2018: one solo record and one with his band The Free Nationals. New music from Anderson .Paak is highly anticipated within the hip-hop community following the enormous praise generated by his Grammy-nominated breakthrough album, Malibu, in 2016. So far this year he’s appeared on the Black Panther soundtrack, and his music was featured in a visually striking Spike Jonze-directed Apple commercial starring FKA Twigs. Today, .Paak released a brand new solo track, “Bubblin”, which was originally debuted on Zane Lowe’s Beats 1 radio program this morning.In this morning’s radio interview, .Paak expressed that “Bubblin” is just one of “65,000 songs in the vault.” The new song is influenced by Jahlil Beats and Antman Wonder, who .Paak described as a “whole lot of fun.” Describing it as “black-007-action-adventure-high-speed-chase type of music,” .Paak said that he also tried to get Lil Sims on the song before he decided to write it alone.Later in the interview, Anderson .Paak revealed that he’s been working alongside Dr. Dre on the forthcoming solo record, who he says has “been very instrumental to taking it to the next level.” Dr. Dre has apparently been involved in the entire creative process, from writing melodies to putting together video ideas. “That’s the whole point when you’re working with a really good producer,” .Paak emphasized, “you let them produce.”There has yet to be an official album announcement from Anderson .Paak on either album, though this single release is certainly a step in the right direction. Dig “Bubblin” by Anderson .Paak below:Anderson . Paak – “Bubblin”<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>Watch the official music video below, starring Anderson .Paak, an ATM machine, his adorable break-dancing son, and a bunch of strippers:Watch Apple’s commercial for HomePod, featuring Anderson .Paak’s “‘Till It’s Over”, available exclusively on Apple Music, below:[H/T CoS]last_img read more

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Sleater-Kinney Teases New Album Produced By St. Vincent

first_imgWhile Brownstein previously mentioned the forthcoming project in early 2018 in an interview with Billboard focused on Portlandia, she warned that it would not be coming any time soon. “Now, just so you know, we’re going to do this very slowly,” she said. “It’s an ongoing conversation.”Now, it appears that conversation includes St. Vincent as a producer, and it’s expected to see the light of day this year. In a new post on social media, Washington-native indie rock trio Sleater-Kinney announced that they have some new music on the way produced by Annie Clark—better known by her stage name, St. Vincent. The post, shared on both Sleater-Kinney and St. Vincent’s pages, is light on details, simply stating “Sleater-Kinney. Produced by St. Vincent. 2019.”The new project would mark Sleater-Kinney’s first studio album since their 2015 comeback LP, No Cities to Love. The trio, comprised of Corin Tucker, Janet Weiss, and Carrie Brownstein, reformed in 2014 following a nearly decade-long hiatus, during which Brownstein earned a new name for herself in the comedy world for her work on Portlandia with Fred Armisen.As Pitchfork notes, early last year, St. Vincent shared a clip of herself warming up for a show with a rendition of Sleater-Kinney’s “Modern Girl”. The year prior, in 2017, St. Vincent collaborated with Brownstein on a series of Instagram short films.last_img read more

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Trey Anastasio Discusses Khruangbin & Yo La Tengo In New Interview

first_imgTrey Anastasio’s new Ghosts of the Forest project will play Los Angeles’ Greek Theatre on April 19th with Yo La Tengo and Berkeley, CA’s Greek Theatre at UC Berkeley on April 20th with Khruangbin. Trey recently caught up with Relix‘s Mike Greenhaus to discuss the upcoming April shows and his admiration for both support acts.Trey begins by discussing the similarities between the upcoming multi-night Greek run and Phish‘s historic 1998 Island Tour run. He explains,I had hoped that the two Greek shows, in two different cities, would end up taking on the quality of one singular event, like the Island Tour from ‘98,” Anastasio says, thinking back to Phish’s famed, last-minute, four-show April run through Long Island and Rhode Island 21 years ago. “Yo La Tengo and Khruangbin both have an elegant musicality that draws a line between the two nights for me, which makes me happy.”Trey moves forward with high praise for both Yo La Tengo and Khruangbin. He continues,I love Yo La Tengo—I Can Hear the Heart Beating as One is my favorite of their albums,” he says of their 1997 mix of sweet, tender songs and droning jams. “Their songs are so good, and there’s an emotional simplicity to their music that feels like they captured lightning in a bottle. I love Georgia’s drumming. Ira is such a cool guitar player. And all three of their vocals are great. I’m excited to meet them. I’m a fan. …My daughter turned me on to Khruangbin after she saw them at a festival a couple years ago, and I love them,” he says. “They have their finger on the pulse. I love how melody-centric they are, particularly the bass, which was the first thing to catch my ear. They sound like they are mining for the universal melody. I believe in that. Music beyond stylistic boundaries—it feels borderless.Trey’s new Ghosts of the Forest band features his Phish bandmate Jon Fishman, Trey Anastasio Band members Jennifer Hartswick, Tony Markellis, and Ray Paczkowski, and vocalist/multi-instrumentalist Celisse Henderson, who was featured alongside Hartswick as a backup singer at Phish’s 2016 Halloween performance of Ziggy Stardust. Fans still have no idea what to expect from the mysterious band, with Trey offering no hints in the recent interview.Tickets are still available for both Greek Theatre shows via Ticketmaster.Trey Anastasio’s Ghosts of the Forest Tour Dates:APRIL4 – Portland, ME – State Theatre5 – Philadelphia, PA – The Met Opera6 – Washington, DC – Anthem9 – Albany, NY – Palace Theatre10 – Boston, MA – Orpheum12 – New York, NY – United Palace Theatre13 – New York, NY – United Palace Theatre19 – Los Angeles, CA – Greek Theatre20 – Berkeley, CA – Greek Theatre at UC BerkeleyView Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Moe. Welcomes Mike Gordon For Allman Brothers Band Cover At Red Rocks [Photo/Video/Full Audio]

first_imgmoe. | Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Morrison, CO | 6/1/2019 | Photos : Bill McAlaine Mike Gordon | Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Morrison, CO | 6/1/2019 | Photos : Bill McAlaine Load remaining images On Saturday, New York rockers moe. offered up an explosive two-set performance at Morrison, CO’s beloved Red Rocks Amphitheatre. White Denim handled the evening’s opening slot, followed by a set of music from Mike Gordon.Moe. opened up their first set with an exploratory take on “Timmy Tucker”, highlighted by Chuck Garvey and Al Schnier trading off a series of scorching guitar solos. With Jim Loughlin holding down a funky groove on the xylophone, the five-piece smoothly segued into “Tubing The River Styx”. Vinnie Amico and Rob Derhak locked into a tight rhythmic pocket before Garvey took the lead and set sail into blissful improvisational territory. Following “Tubing The River Styx”, moe. moved forward with “Dangerous Game” and “Jazz Cigarette”, a pair of newer tunes that the band debuted at Portland, ME’s State Theatre in February.Loughlin continued to dazzled the crowd with his xylophone playing before the band segued into the Derhak led “Water”.  To close out their impressive first set, moe. invited up Gordon to add a second bass on a cover of the Allman Brothers Band‘s “In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed”. Amico and Loughlin set the pace behind their kits before Garvey and Schnier locked into “Liz Reed’s” main guitar theme. Picking up the pace, Gordon and Derhak treated Red Rocks to a badass bass duel, as the rowdy crowd erupted with applause. Moe. did the ABB cover justice in a venue that the beloved band played many times over their illustrious career.Following a brief setbreak, moe. returned to open their second set with “The Road”. The band displayed some impressive vocal harmonies before Schnier got his chance to take a gritty guitar solo backed by Amico’s hard-hitting beats. “The Road” landed into “New Hope For The New Year”, with Garvey taking over the vocal lead. Following a series of peaking guitar solos, Schnier moved over to his keyboard set up and the band connected on “Bullet, with the attentive crowd singing along with the band. Loughlin was on fire all night long, hopping between his percussion kit and xylophone. The improv-heavy set continued with “Crushing”, which segued into the fan-favorite “George”. The band patiently worked through “George” before closing out their main frame with a massive take on “Rebubula”. Despite getting cut off due to a newly enforced strict curfew policy, moe. offered up a cover of The Vapors‘ “Turning Japanese” in the encore slot.Enjoy full-show audio and some videos below:moe. – Red Rocks Amphitheatre – 6/1/2019 [Full Audio][Audio: marcus]Mike Gordon – “Crazy Sometimes”[Video: spaceodyssee2000]Mike Gordon – “Whirlwind”[Video: spaceodyssee2000]moe. – “Rebubula”[Video: Dalton Michael Vaughan]Check out some beautiful photos from Saturday night’s show below courtesy of photographer Bill McAlaine.Next up for moe. is their own moe.down festival at Turin, NY’s Snow Ridge Ski Area on July 4th-6th. For ticketing information and a full list of moe.’s upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website.Setlist: moe. | Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Morrison, CO | 6/1/2019Set One: Timmy Tucker >(nh) Tubing The River Styx > The Pit > Dangerous Game, Jazz Cigarette > Water, In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed*Set Two: The Road > New Hope For The New Year > Bullet, Crushing > George > RebubulaEncore: Turning Japanese{* w/ Mike Gordon on bass} Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Shinagel receives service citation

first_imgMichael Shinagel, Harvard dean of Continuing Education and University Extension, is the recipient of the 2010 Walton S. Bittner Service Citation from the University Continuing Education Association (UCEA). The award recognizes him for his outstanding contributions to continuing education at Harvard, and for service of major significance to UCEA.Among Shinagel’s achievements cited are his work with Harvard’s human resource department to establish the Tuition Assistance Plan (TAP) in 1976; his expansion of the Harvard Extension School from fewer than 200 courses and 6,000 students in 1975, to more than 600 courses and 14,000 students today; the creation of Harvard Extension School master’s degree programs in the liberal arts that have graduated 2,000 individuals to date; and his service as editor of UCEA’s “Continuing Higher Education Review” for the past 13 years.Admired by his continuing education decanal counterparts around the world, Shinagel’s contributions to his institution and UCEA are summed up by Mary McIntire, dean of Continuing Studies, Rice University: “Mike generously helps all who seek his advice or opinion. He encourages younger people in the field, not only by example, but by maintaining an active interest in their careers and accomplishments. He has succeeded so admirably at Harvard, in the community, and in the field … we are fortunate to have him among us.”last_img read more

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Right choice, but not the intuitive one

first_imgTo take a gratifying, low-paying job or a well-paid corporate position, to get married or play the field, to move across the country or stay put: The fact that most people face such choices at some point in their lives doesn’t make them any easier. No one knows the dilemma better than law students, who are poised to enter a competitive job market after staking years of study on their chosen field.When faced with a tough choice, we already have the cognitive tools we need to make the right decision, Daniel Gilbert, professor of psychology at Harvard and host of the PBS series “This Emotional Life,” told a Harvard Law School (HLS) audience on Feb. 16. The hard part is overcoming the tricks our minds play on us that render rational decision-making nearly impossible.Gilbert’s talk, titled “How To Do Precisely the Right Thing at All Possible Times,” was part of Living Well in the Law, a new program sponsored by the HLS Dean of Students Office that aims to help law students consider their personal and professional development beyond the fast track of summer associate positions and big-law job offers.There is a relatively simple equation for figuring out the best course of action in any situation, Gilbert explained: What are the odds of a particular action getting you what you want, and how much do you value getting what you want? If you really want something, and you identify an action that will make it likely, then taking that action is a good move.Unfortunately, Gilbert said, “these are also the two ways human beings screw up.”First, he said, humans have a hard time estimating how likely we are to get what we want. “We know how to calculate odds [mathematically], but it’s not how we actually calculate odds,” he said.We buy lottery tickets, because we “never see interviews with lottery losers.” If every one of the 170 million losing ticket holders were interviewed on television for 10 seconds apiece, we’d be having the image of losing drilled into our brains for 65 straight years, he said.“When something’s easy to imagine, you think it’s more likely to happen,” he said.For example, if asked to guess the number of annual deaths in the United States by firework accidents and storms versus asthma and drowning, most people will vastly overestimate the former and underestimate the latter. That’s because we don’t see headlines when someone dies of an asthma attack or drowns, Gilbert said. “It’s less available in your memory, but it is in fact more frequent.”Then there’s the fact that we’re prone to irrational levels of optimism, a pattern that has been documented across all areas of life. Sports fans in every city believe their team has better-than-average odds of winning; the vast majority of people believe they’ll live to be 100.A study of Harvard seniors, Gilbert gleefully reported, showed they on average believed they’d finish their theses within 28 to 48 days, but most likely within 33 — “a number virtually indistinguishable from their best-case scenario.” In reality, they complete their theses within 56 days on average.Still, he said, calculating our odds of success is actually the easy part. “What’s really hard in life is knowing how much you’re going to value the thing you’re striving so hard to get,” he said.When we consider buying a $2 cup of coffee at Starbucks, for example, we don’t compare the satisfaction of a morning caffeine jolt against the millions of other things we could purchase for $2. Rather, we compare the value of that cup of coffee against our own past experiences. If the same coffee only cost $1.50 yesterday, we might balk at paying $2 for it today.“One of the problems with this bias, this tendency to pay attention to change, is that it’s hard to know if things really did change,” he said. “Whether things changed is often in the eye of the beholder.“It turns out that every form of judgment works by comparison,” he said. “People shop by comparison.” Unfortunately, our comparisons are easily manipulated, and comparing one option with all other possible options is an impossible task.Real estate companies, for example, show potential buyers “set-up properties,” rundown fixer-uppers that they actually own, to lower their clients’ expectations for houses that are actually for sale.In his own lab, Gilbert’s research team had two groups of college students predict how much they would enjoy eating a bag of potato chips. The group that sat in a room with chocolates on display predicted they’d enjoy the chips less, while the second group — stuck in a room with the chips and a variety of canned meats — predicted much higher enjoyment of the salty snack.But when the students rated their enjoyment of the chips while they were eating them, those differences disappeared. While their previous visual judgment was tainted by comparison, their judgment of the actual taste was not.“The comparisons you make when you’re shopping are not the ones you’ll make after you’ve bought,” Gilbert said.The human mind evolved to deal with different dilemmas than the ones we face today, Gilbert explained. Our ancestors weighed short-term consequences to ensure their survival, evolving a snap-judgment process that often serves us poorly when making long-term decisions such as buying a home, investing in the stock market, or making a cross-country move.The brain “thinks like the old machine it is,” Gilbert said. “We are in some sense on a very ancient vessel, and we are sailing a very ancient sea.”Still, he told his audience, we have the ability to overcome these evolutionary roadblocks to self-aware, smart decision-making, as long as we acknowledge our biases.“We’ve been given that gift,” Gilbert said. “The question is, will we use it?”last_img read more

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Prolonged sitting, TV viewing appear to shorten life

first_imgSitting for more than three hours a day may shorten your life by two years, even if you are physically active and don’t smoke, according to a new study by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Pennington Biomedical Research Center (PBRC) in Baton Rouge, La. Watching TV for more than two hours a day may also reduce life expectancy by another 1.4 years, they found.The study, published July 10, 2012 in the online journal BMJ Open, is one of a growing number of recent studies pointing to the health hazards of a sedentary lifestyle. Several previous studies have linked extended periods spent sitting down and/or watching TV to conditions such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.I-Min Lee, professor of epidemiology at HSPH, and Peter T. Katzmarzyk of PBRC analyzed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to calculate the amount of time U.S. adults spent watching TV and sitting. They reviewed the research database MEDLINE for published studies on sitting time and deaths from all causes, pooled the data from the five relevant studies involving almost 167,000 adults, and reanalyzed it, taking account of age and sex. They combined this data and the NHANES figures to come up with an estimate of the theoretical effects of a risk factor at a population. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Too sweet for our own good

first_imgThe United States is simply too sweet for its own good.Even the “healthy” fruit drinks that Americans sip are packed with the amount of sugar in six cookies. That love affair is making us sick.“There’s no question we consume too much sugar,” said Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). “It is not only bad for your teeth, it’s associated with increased risk of diabetes, hypertension, and is bad for your heart.”Hu spoke at the HSPH panel “Sugar, Salt, and Supplements: Sorting the Science” on Monday, just weeks after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced its first overhaul of food-product labels in 20 years. The revamped labels will provide consumers with nutrition facts, calorie counts in boldface type, and realistic serving sizes. They also will also disclose how much sugar manufacturers add to their products, all with an eye toward helping the public make healthier eating choices.The World Health Organization proposes reducing the daily sugar dose from 10 percent of calories to 5, the equivalent of eight teaspoons. Hu called it a “very ambitious but achievable goal.”Hu, who is also a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and Channing Lab at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, pointed to the health consequences of failing to act. Centers for Disease Control studies show that people who get more than 10 percent of their daily calories from products with added sugar had a 40 percent increased risk of dying of heart disease, Hu said.Panelist Dariush Mozaffarian ’06, an associate professor in epidemiology at HSPH, warned that the dietary focus should also be on targeting “poor-quality carbohydrates” such as refined grains, potatoes, and sugar.“Fifty percent of our calories come from poor-quality carbohydrates,” said Mozaffarian, an associate professor in cardiovascular medicine at HMS and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “Mary Poppins said a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down. There’s a lot of good, healthy, whole-grain products with a little bit of added sugar … If we just use sugars (to gauge a product), we could get misled.”Hu said the new labeling system would be a relatively easy way to count empty calories in sugar, compared with the more complicate tracking of refined starch in foods such as bagels and potatoes.  He also supports government programs like ones that ban sales of sugary drinks or large sodas.“They increase awareness about this major public health problem,” Hu said. “There is no magic bullet.”Panelist JoAnn Manson ’75, professor in epidemiology at HSPH and chief of preventive medicine at the Brigham, said the new food labels will prove critical to pressuring food manufacturers to reduce the levels of added sugar and salt.“When consumers are making choices, it’s so important to have something that’s easily visible and can see differences,” said Manson. “That will put pressure [on companies] to develop foods with lower sugars and sodium. They’ll go with other options. Many consumers have no idea how much sugar and salt is in their food.”The panel, presented in collaboration with the Huffington Post and moderated by its senior editor for health news, Amanda Chan, also addressed the latest scientific data on salt intake.Mozaffarian called overuse of salt a “global health problem.” He said current guidelines range as high as 4 grams of sodium per day, but should be closer 1.5 to 2 grams. Sodium is injected into processed foods such as bread and meat so they stay fresh, he said. “All that can be reduced,” Mozaffarian added. “The government needs to do something.”Some Americans try to make up for their bad eating habits by taking multivitamins and supplements like fish oil. Manson said everyone needs vitamin D, and the recommended adult guideline is 800 IUs (international units) with calcium for bone health. But the jury is still out on whether greater amounts might prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease. Testing is being done on doses of 2,000 IUs daily, she added. Still, Manson said the “jury is still out” as to whether many supplements are safe and effective.“There will never be a replacement for a healthy, well-balanced diet,” Manson said.Sugar, Salt & Supplements <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJiYMHdr3p8″ rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/ZJiYMHdr3p8/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> A Harvard School of Public Health panel sorts out the science in Americans consumption of sugar, salt, and supplements. Courtesy of The Forum at the Harvard School of Public Healthlast_img read more

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