A ‘virtual dinner’ where the chefs are invisible

first_imgWhat makes bread rise, or sour cream, sour? What turns grapes into wine, or milk into cheese? What makes coffee drinkable and chocolate wonderful?“All of these processes happen because of microbes — key players in not only what we love and enjoy, but what we also need to survive,” Roberto Kolter, Harvard Medical School professor of microbiology and immunobiology and director of its Microbial Sciences Initiative,  told 70 guests at the “Invisible Chefs” lecture at the Harvard Ed Portal in Allston last week.“When you are eating your food, you are appreciating it and digesting it thanks to microbes,” Kolter said. “Tonight, we are going to talk about how microbes craft delicious foods, and then we are going to taste them.”Everything we eat contains microbes. They are the invisible farmers, invisible chefs, and the invisible digesters that, through different processes, have supplied Homo sapiens with essential nutrients since the beginning of our existence, Kolter said.“We are completely covered with microbes, inside and out; they are everywhere and we can’t live without them,” said co-lecturer Pia Sörensen, senior preceptor in chemical engineering and applied materials at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “Everything on this planet is based on the activities of microbes, so it’s no surprise that the food we make and eat is microbial.”Kolter said the process begins in the soil, which is full of microbes that enable things to grow.Fermenting foods can harness good microbes’ potential to do appetizing things to food, and keep harmful microbes from destroying it, explained Pia Sörensen. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer“When you see food emerging from earth, we can only see the plant that emerges. But every grain in fertile soil has been produced through the action of microbes, the tiny little cells that are impossible to see,” Kolter said.When animals eat grass, specialized microbes in their stomachs allow them to digest it in a way that humans cannot. However, because of our own specialized microbes, we can in turn digest the animals.Interestingly, animals that consume grass for survival cannot healthily digest grains because those completely change the microbial environment in their stomachs, and make them sick. Different microbes specialize in different end results, and their activity determines how food is digested, Kolter explained.“You may have heard that grass-fed animals are really very important, but you may not know why,” he said. “It’s not just a myth that we should eat pasture-fed meat. We get a very different product because of the microbes changing so dramatically.”Anthropologists argue that one of the things that makes us human is that we cook our food, altering the composition of microbes and thus our ability to digest them.“One consequence of cooking food with heat is that it kills both the good and harmful microbes, and in my speculation, we became less resistant to what our dogs and cats can eat,” Kolter said. “They have the right microbes in their guts that can tolerate all this, and pets are able to protect themselves.”It turns out that microbes, like humans and all other living things, must eat to survive, and, again like humans, in the process they cook and they generate waste products. But unlike humans, microbes grow and reproduce in a matter of minutes, and they do it without utilizing oxygen. What makes that directly relevant to cooking, said Kolter, is that their waste products create fermentation.Fermentation is a chemical breakdown that occurs without the presence of oxygen. Fermentation gives many of our favorite foods their flavor, texture, and aroma. There are two types of fermentation — alcoholic fermentation that produces wine, beer, and bread, and lactic acid fermentation, seen in yogurt, sauerkraut, and pickles.“Probably everyone today eats or drinks fermented food, everything from bread, cheese, coffee, pickles, and olives to yogurt and salami,” said Sörensen. “It’s very prevalent and the diversity of flavors you can get with microbes is huge.“Think of milk, it’s a little sweet, or yogurt, which is a little sour, and cheese, which is a little pungent and complex. Different microbes provide entirely different flavors.”Hyuna Lee of Medford (left) hides her laughter as Betsy Burkhardt of Cambridge does a blind taste test with wine at the Ed Portal. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerSörensen said fermenting foods also harnesses good microbes’ potential to do appetizing things to food, and keeps harmful microbes from coming in and destroying it. In fact, in the late 19th century, the fermentation process involved in wine was believed to increase our life span, and vintners touted slogans such as “Wine is the healthiest and most hygienic of all drinks.”Audience members were asked to taste microbial foods, including bread, cheese, olives, wine, coffee, and chocolate. Kolter asked his “dinner guests” to close their eyes before sipping the wine and try to determine if they were drinking red or white, because it is actually the visual characteristics that help us distinguish between them.It is not just wine that can fool even the most careful connoisseurs, Kolter said. Sometimes the fermentation process itself is mysterious. He cited chocolate and coffee, two foods that start as inedible seeds but, with microbes’ help, turn yummy.“We understand the primary fermentation processes in cheese and alcoholic beverages. It is well-characterized and fairly easy to control,” he said. “But with coffee and chocolate production, after you pick the beans they are simply left alone, and fermentation occurs over time before you can eat them.“We don’t truly understand it, nor can we fully replicate it yet.”Betsy Burkhardt of Cambridge, a biologist who had just returned from a cheese tour of France, said she came to the lecture to learn more about the symbiotic relationship of microbes and food.“In France, I learned all about blue cheese and how the microbes — the mold — grows,” she said. “It’s the mold that has the flavor, so when you slice the cheese you have to cut it so that everyone is able to taste it.”Robert Schaeffer of Allston had a different agenda.“When I saw there was a food-tasting related to microbes, it occurred to me that this is something to learn more about,” he said. “Knowing microbes are in our food, it now makes me know what I’m eating.”“Invisible Chefs” was a precursor to the HarvardX course “Cooking with Microbes,” available in late 2018. The currently available HarvardX course “Science & Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to Soft Matter Science” teaches the underlying scientific principles of food.Kolter’s work with microbiology photographer Scott Chimileski, “World in a Drop: Photographic Explorations of Microbial Life,” is currently on display at the Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St.last_img read more

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Group examines, votes on internal issues

first_imgStudent body vice president Nidia Ruelas said student senate has done “very well” engaging in critical issues this year.“We’ve fostered together a climate of dialogue where people are talking with each other instead of to each other and when they’re engaging these issues, even if they disagree, even if they’re difficult issues,” she said. Senate’s biggest, most recent accomplishment was the passing of three resolutions regarding election reform in November, Ruelas said. The new regulations allow candidates more freedom when engaging with voters online and through social media platforms.  “That came out of a lot of dialogue, a lot of work and a lot of work was done outside of Senate,” Ruelas said. “But within Senate, the talk that was shared was very good and helpful.” Discussion and feedback on Onward, a forum for students to submit and vote on ideas, and the University’s Honor Code also had a “good input,” according to Ruelas.   “Some of the conversation regarding the academic integrity was also a huge success for Senate because they engaged the topic critically,” she said. Ruelas said senators have also done an excellent job of communicating between student government and their dorms, especially regarding the new sustainability initiatives in the dining halls. Senators are also “very active” in their departments. “For example, if they’re active through University Affairs, maybe they’re involved in things like the Huddle price scanner,” she said. With the recently released recommendations of the Core Curriculum Review Committee, Ruelas said discussing the recommended changes will be a main focus for next semester. “I think the intention is that this conversation goes out during the whole semester,” she said. Ruelas said academic integrity will be another focus as the “actual policies and recommendations are being thought up” from the University Code of Honor Committee. Diversity and inclusion will be another focus for senators to consider next semester, she said. “The other one that we want to stress is diversity and inclusion in many ways, not just racial or ethnic, but also socioeconomic. To some extent I think we’ve addressed those issues, but they’ll probably be the focus for next semester.”Ruelas says she hopes to incorporate other groups when working on issues of diversity and inclusion. “At the beginning of the year we had the diversity and inclusion training and another thing I think we can do is to foster a discussion related to the ‘It’s Time ND’ campaign that Diversity Council has led forward, so I think that things like that, bringing in speakers to talk, and maybe it would even take the form of a resolution too,” she said.Tags: Student government, student government in focus, student senatelast_img read more

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Students express dejection, uncertainty, optimism in face of permanent virtual semester

first_imgAccepting online courses and virtual learningSome students believe the transition to online classes will leave them with a smaller set of tools to assist them with their education.“Normally I learn better face to face and hands-on, so I’m thinking the change to online classes will affect me in some way, but I’m not sure exactly how yet,” Notre Dame freshman Milena Fava-Pastilha said. Stalter said she anticipates working from home to be a difficult adjustment because she’s used to spending time away from school to relax with her family during breaks.“I am struggling to find a routine that is always very easily pushed on me when I am on campus because of the set times of classes and numerous extracurriculars,” Stalter said.Jessica Hardig, a Saint Mary’s junior, agreed saying the lack of routine makes it harder to find the motivation to complete her coursework.“I also was just concerned about how my grades may slip doing all my work at home instead of my ideal study spots where I focus so well such as Reignbeaux or Trumper,” she said. “I did not feel very prepared, but knew it would have to be a switch that I got used to very fast.”Some states like California and Illinois have mandated statewide orders to remain at home, which also poses concerns to students. Leutz, a native of the Chicago suburbs, said the lack of freedom to go into town is disappointing.“It is going to be hard to have to stay in my house all day long since I can’t even go to a coffee shop or something to do work,” Leutz said. Stalter said she is concerned about some of her classes that seem less conducive to the virtual setup, but her professors have been very reassuring throughout the uncertainty.“This anxiety was definitely pushed aside after receiving emails from professors and reading how empathetic they are to us and the circumstances that we are in,” she said.Stalter acknowledged how grateful she is for the professors working with students to learn how to orient their courses online.“I truly have been able to recognize the hard work that my professors do and the amount of patience and love that they have for their students during times of distress,” she said.Notre Dame junior Anna Wellen said though the current situation is unprecedented, she is prepared to adapt.“It’s going to be a big adjustment with [all of my siblings and me] trying to do our online classes, but we did just upgrade our Wi-Fi, so hopefully we’ll have enough bandwidth to [do] all the Zoom classes,” Wellen said. After learning the news that Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross would not be returning to campus for the remainder of the semester due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, students across the tri-campus community reacted with a variety of emotions to the knowledge that seniors would lose their last memories on campus and others would be separated from their respective campuses for months.Saint Mary’s senior Katy Stalter has been attempting to manage her time away from her friends, room and campus since she first heard that students would not be returning to campus. Stalter said she is shocked she won’t be able to complete her senior year on the campus she called home for four years.When she received the email, Stalter said she immediately thought, “I need to text my group message with all of my best friends and tell them that I love them.”With the decision to halt in-person classes for the rest of the semester — announced a week after a notice to suspend in-person classes for 4 weeks at the three institutions — Notre Dame senior Sam Jones said he originally thought he might have the chance to live on campus as a student once more. However, Jones quickly realized the possibility of returning was slim.“I liked the idea that we were going to pause and wait two weeks and then come back and reevaluate, so I was kind of disappointed that we didn’t end up doing that,” Jones said. “But at the same time, I was not surprised by the ultimate decision since other colleges were canceling for the rest of the semester.”Holy Cross junior Rylee Horn said in a text that although she would not be able to spend the rest of the semester with her friends, she understood why the decision was made.Although the majority of students have returned home, their belongings remain on campus. Jones, a resident assistant in Stanford Hall, said he does not know what move out will look like but hopes to have it as a chance to say goodbye to his section mates. “I’d like to see all my guys, and I know it probably won’t happen, but I’d like to help them move out just to get closure,” Jones said. Stalter also said she she’s concerned about graduation with her fellow seniors in May, but she remains hopeful.Unlike students in residence halls, off-campus students face a different situation: stay in their current housing or pack up and return to their hometown. Notre Dame senior Nina Leutz decided to choose the latter option.“Some of my friends  not many, but some of them, are staying in their off-campus houses, but there’s nothing to do in South Bend since everything is closing,” Leutz said.  A new reality outside of the tri-campus communityWith the novel COVID-19 disrupting not only the semester but also the proceedings of everyday life, seniors worry about the job offers they accepted for the summer or fall, juniors await the rescheduling of graduate school exams and undergraduates wonder if their summer internships will fall through.While Jones has yet to worry about his personal post-graduation plans for next fall, he explained that he has seen stress in some peers in his senior class.“All of a sudden, everyone in my class has come to the realization that a month ago, we were pretty confident with our post-grad plans and now there’s a chance of offers being rescinded,” Jones said. Meanwhile, Wellen’s plan to take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) in April will likely be postponed, but she said she is not too concerned, given that college students across the nation are dealing with the same circumstances.“It’s probably getting pushed back, but that’s okay because I’ll just be able to study more, which I wasn’t able to do as much on campus due to my involvement with extracurriculars,” Wellen said. For Fava-Pastilha, the severity of COVID-19 could potentially affect her summer as she was planning on interning in New York City.“I don’t know what kind of effect this is going to have on my internship,” Fava-Pastilha said. “If this whole situation will last well into the summer, I might lose that opportunity.”Horn said the disruption to the semester has also affected student preparations for the future.“There has been a lot of struggles with the cancellations of in-person classes and activities, one of which is HCC’s student government association,” Horn said in a text. “We now have to resort to online meetings to prepare the incoming President and VP for the next school year.”For many seniors, it is difficult to process how their final weeks have already come to a close.“It is very hard to suddenly leave a place that you have called ‘home’ and return to the ‘home’ that you left many years ago,” Stalter said.Despite the uncertainty, Leutz remains optimistic that she will be able to return to Notre Dame for a last farewell.“I’m still hopeful that senior week still happens and that graduation still happens,” Leutz said.Tags: COVID-19, Holy Cross, Notre Dame, Online classes, post-graduation, saint mary’slast_img read more

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Bill would require JNCs to rank judicial nominees

first_img April 30, 2000 Regular News Bill would require JNCs to rank judicial nominees Judicial nominating commissions could send any number of nominees to the Governor and also must rank their choices under a proposed constitutional amendment that has cleared a key Florida House committee.HJR 923, which calls for JNC deliberations to be open to the public, was repassed by the House Judiciary Committee on April 11, with two new amendments. The committee had passed the bill earlier in the session, but the Rules and Calendar Committee returned it when the sponsor, Rep. Fred Brummer, R-Apopka, sought to add major amendments. Under House rules, the rules panel cannot consider substantive amendments.One of Brummer’s amendments deleted language that requires JNCs to submit three to six nominees to the Governor. Instead, the constitution would require the Governor to appoint “one person from the list of all applicants” sent up by the JNCs.The second change would add this language to the constitution: “The judicial nomination commission shall review the qualifications of every applicant for a judicial office and shall prepare a list of all such applicants in rank order based on their qualifications, along with any comment and recommendation, and shall submit such list to the Governor. . . . “As had the earlier version, the bill also removed the provision that allowed JNCs to have their deliberations in secret, although all other parts of their meetings, including candidate interviews, are open.As he has been on other bills affecting JNCs and the judiciary, Brummer was critical of The Florida Bar in commenting on his legislation.“The bill opens an area of government that is closed. Florida is strong on open government. This is good procedure,” he said. “The only people who oppose open government is The Florida Bar because of their effective control of the judicial selection process.”Rep. Curt Levine, D-Boca Raton, criticized HJR 923.“The bill is not going to lead to a better process where people are selected,” he said. “If the commissions cannot have frank and open discussions, the public is going to be deprived of the best candidates.”Levine argued the public already has sufficient information about candidates because their applications and JNC interviews are accessible. “I really don’t think anything positive results. If anything, it adds political influence on who our judges are,” he added.The measure passed the panel 6-2.A similar bill, SJR 396, passed the Senate Judiciary Committee early in March and it has been pending before the Senate Rules and Calendar Committee since. That bill, sponsored by Sen. Anna Cowin, R-Leesburg, does not remove the requirement that JNCs submit three to six finalists or require the JNCs to rank their nominees.center_img Bill would require JNCs to rank judicial nominees last_img read more

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Never burn a bridge with former girlfriends

first_img 41SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Never burn a bridge with former girlfriends.  It can jump start a career.   I stayed friendly with my high school girlfriend Maryanne who married John Unangst the President of Franklin Mint Federal Credit Union.   John formed one of the first CUSOs in 1988.   The CUSO provided mortgage services and data processing services to multiple credit unions.   As a result of meeting John through Maryanne, I formed John’s CUSO.  John became a director on the newly formed NACUSO Board and asked me to go with him to San Diego on his dime to a NACUSO Conference and play golf.  My bags were packed before he finished his invitation.In San Diego, I did a presentation to a four table conference.  John suggested to the NACUSO Board that I be their General Counsel.   My most attractive feature was that I was free.   So began my representation of NACUSO.  I thought I could handle this gig as CUSOs are essentially small businesses and I had a lot of experience representing small businesses, including being the attorney for the local Chamber of Commerce.   I grew up in a small business.  My parents owned two restaurants. Eventually, my practice evolved into the near exclusive representation of credit unions and CUSOs.The part of our practice that gets my juices flowing is helping credit unions create and expand CUSOs and other collaborative relationships.   How can we structure a relationship between organizations and people that will reward all participants on a personal and professional level?  Collaboration is not easy.  It is not altruistic.  It is finding people with the right values and incentives to work together to achieve a common goal.  It is a challenge but when it works, it can provide amazing results.last_img read more

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Top Arsenal target Ryan Fraser questions Bournemouth’s price tag

first_imgAdvertisement Will Ryan Fraser leave Bournemouth? (Picture: Getty Images)Ryan Fraser may have emerged as one of Arsenal’s top summer transfer targets but the midfielder has questioned the valuation placed on his head by his own club.The Bournemouth ace is wanted by Gunners boss Unai Emery but the Scottish star suspects Arsenal will be priced out of a move.Eddie Howe’s side are demanding £30million for the 25-year-old wide man – a significant portion of Emery’s summer budget.With just 12 months left on his contract, it can be viewed as a steep valuation for the Scotland international and Fraser admitted he can’t see anyone coughing up that sort of money.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘I honestly don’t think anyone will be paying that [£30m],’ Fraser told The Scotsman. ‘It was six or seven months ago that we last spoke about my future, but nothing since. Even in the end of season meeting I had with the manager [Eddie Howe], we didn’t speak about my future. Top Arsenal target Ryan Fraser questions Bournemouth’s price tag Eddie Howe will be keen to keep him (Picture: Getty Images)‘He knows I’m not one to speak about it. If something happens, it will happen. If it doesn’t, then I’m not one to throw my rattle out of the pram. I’ll keep trying my best. I keep getting things tagged on Instagram that I’m going 
places and I think ‘Am I?’.‘I’ve got a year left with Bournemouth. If I’m there, I’ll give my all. If I’m somewhere else, I’ll give my all. I just want to play well, do my best and work hard for my team-mates.’Fraser admitted he’s happy to be linked with a move away from Dean Court, but insists a summer transfer has not become an obsession. Metro Sport ReporterFriday 14 Jun 2019 11:35 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.7kSharescenter_img Unai Emery wants Fraser (Picture: Getty Images)‘It’s nice [to be linked with big clubs],’ he added. ‘But I’m just one of those players who enjoys playing football, wherever I am. I never look too far ahead, I never want to try and think “where am I going to be playing?”‘Because if you start thinking like that, then you’ll probably start playing badly and not concentrating on the here and now on the pitch.‘Not once, since the season stopped at Bournemouth, have I thought “where am I going to be next season?” It was just about staying fit for the Scotland matches against Cyprus and Belgium and then wherever I’ll be, I’ll be. As long as I’m enjoying my football, that’s all I care about.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Advertisement Commentlast_img read more

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Glasgow schoolboy in custody over ‘hate crime attack’ on Nigerian preacher

first_imgA 15-year old schoolboy has been arrested in connection with an alleged attack on a Nigerian preacher.The 46-year old preacher was reportedly robbed and hit with a glass bottle late in the evening on Friday.He was walking along Bardowie Street to his local church in Ashfield Street, Glasgow, when the incident took place.Police are treating the incident as a hate crime since reference to the preacher’s colous was allegedly made during the attack.The boy has been detained in custody in connection with the incident.last_img

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Medical schools sign MOU to create Caribbean disaster medicine centre

first_img 235 Views   no discussions Share PEMBROKE PINES, USA (Caribbean News Now) — American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine (AUC) and Harvard Medical Faculty Physicians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (HMFP) have signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU), with the aim of establishing a centre of excellence for disaster medicine in the Caribbean.“As a medical school with its main campus in the Caribbean, AUC is ideally positioned to develop medical education and training opportunities in the areas of hurricane preparedness and emergency response to benefit the region and beyond,” said Heidi Chumley, MD, MBA, executive dean at AUC. “We’re excited to work with HMFP to explore a wide range of collaborative efforts, and apply our combined expertise to the challenges facing the country of St Maarten and the region.”HMFP is the academic physician group exclusively affiliated with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), a major Harvard Medical School teaching affiliate in Boston. HMFP deploys members of its emergency medicine department to collaborations across the globe to build capacity in disaster preparedness and response systems, and provides continuing education and training to healthcare professionals and first responders.“This collaboration with AUC offers a uniquely positioned platform to develop academic, research, and operational capacity in a region where hurricanes and tropical storms pose a threat,” said Gregory R. Ciottone, MD, FACEP, FFSEM, director of the Division of Disaster Medicine at BIDMC and associate professor of emergency medicine at Harvard Medical School. “We’re looking forward to engaging with experts in the Caribbean through this centre of excellence in disaster medicine, and exposing more medical students to this challenging and immensely rewarding field.”Currently in the planning stage, the centre could potentially include academic exchanges involving faculty and medical students, continuing education and training programs, conferences and symposia, and on-site teaching on AUC’s St Maarten medical sciences campus by Harvard Medical School faculty, and leverage the wide range of medical and healthcare resources and programs within Adtalem, the parent organization AUC in St Maarten, Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) in Dominica and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) in St Kitts.Adtalem has recently become embroiled in a massive controversy over its decision to relocate RUSM from Dominica to Barbados following Hurricane Maria in September 2017, thus impacting some 30 percent of Dominica’s economy and thus its ability to recover from the devastation caused by Maria. Share HealthInternationalLifestyleNewsPrintRegional Medical schools sign MOU to create Caribbean disaster medicine centre by: – August 9, 2018center_img Sharing is caring! Tweet Sharelast_img read more

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Bacolod cops face charges over jailbreak

first_imgBACOLOD City – Two cops onduty during Monday’s jailbreak are facing criminal raps. Sazon and Capa were residents of Barangay Banago while Penoso was fromBarangay 2. All were charged for drug-related crimes except Elangos, who hasbeen charged for child abuse. Colonel Henry Biñas, director of theBacolod City Police Office (BCPO), ordered Police Station 3 chief Major RuelCulanag to arrest and detain the two cops, who were subsequently charged beforethe City Prosecutor’s Office, and subjected to the administrative investigation. On Tuesday afternoon, one of the fourfugitives who bolted the lockup facility of Police Station 3surrendered to authorities. The 20-year-old Ely Lawrence Sazon,who faces drug-related charges, was among the four detainees who made theirescape by cutting the steel bar of their detention cell using a saw bladeshortly after midnight on Monday. The otherescapees were Sunny Capa, Michael Peñoso and Jeffrey Elangos Staff Sergeant Eric Olverio andCorporal Orwayne Jade Nadado have been charged with infidelity in the custodyof prisoners under Article 223, Section 1, Chapter 5 of the Revised Penal Code. “If negligence is proven on theirpart, they will be held liable for gross neglect of duty which is punishable bydismissal from the service. It is very unfortunate that one of them (Olverio)is retiring soon,” Biñas said. Biñas has given Culanag torecapture the escapees within two weeks. “Masmaayo nga mag surrender na lang kamokay basi may matabo pa sa inyo,” said Biñas as he urged the remainingfugitives to turn themselves in to authorities./PNlast_img read more

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Louis J. Mauer

first_imgLouis J. Mauer, 96, passed away on Friday, January 11, 2019 at IU Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis.Born, June 4, 1922 in Decatur County, he was the son of Jacob and Josephine (Berkemeier) Mauer.Louis was veteran of WWII, serving in the Army from 1942 until 1945.  He was stationed in the Pacific and was awarded a Purple Heart in 1944.  He worked for Moorman Sawmill in St. Maurice and farmed for most of his life before retirement.Louis was a member of St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in St. Maurice.  He was also a member of the American Legion Post 129 in Greensburg.Louis married Catherine E. Schroeder on April 12, 1951 and she survives.Survivors include, his wife; Catherine Mauer, Greensburg, 6 sons; James (Cheryl) Mauer, Batesville, John (Lori) Mauer, Greensburg, Jerome (Sue) Mauer, Greensburg, Philip Mauer, Greensburg, David (Marilles) Mauer, Greensburg, Brian (Lori) Mauer, Greensburg, 7 daughters; Barbara (Randy) O’Dell, Greensburg, Deborah (Robert) Schott, Indianapolis, Jane (Phillip) Wallpe, Greensburg, Joan (Butch) Riedeman, Greensburg, Cynthia (Phil) Geis, Greensburg, Jeanne (Jeff) Loechle, Greensburg, Beth (Colby) McCorkel, Carmel, 31 grandchildren, and 43 great grandchildren.He was preceded in death by his parents, two brothers; Leonard and Ed Mauer, two sisters; Dorothy and Marie Mauer, and two grandchildren; Emily Mauer and Ben McCorkel.A rosary service will begin at 3:30 pm on Monday, January 14, 2019 at Porter-Oliger-Pearson Funeral Home followed by visitation until 8 pm.Visitation will also be from 10-11 am on Tuesday, January 15, 2019 at St. Catherine of Siena, St. Maurice followed by a funeral mass at 11:00 am officiated by Rev. Bill Ehalt.Burial and military graveside rites will follow at St. Maurice Catholic Cemetery.Memorials can be made to St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church.Online condolences can be made to the family at www.popfuneralhome.comlast_img read more

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