Gosia Wlaszczuk and Syracuse fall short in 4-set loss to UNC

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 7, 2015 at 12:37 am Contact Jack: jfupton@syr.edu Gosia Wlaszczuk left the court in tears. With her sweatshirt wrapped around her head, she tried to contain her emotions.“She’s very competive,” Syracuse head coach Leonid Yelin said of the senior. “She was disappointed in herself sometimes, and sometimes with the decision of a hitter.”Wlaszczuk, who’s not usually the most emotional player, was getting in the face of her teammates, slamming the ball into the ground and screaming at herself after points.Yelin spoke about Wlaszczuk’s relentless effort and passion for the game. He mentioned that she gets frustrated when her teammates are not giving 100 percent.“When she thinks it’s time to push it and somebody is making a sloppy play, that’s when you hear from her,” Yelin said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe team spoke about the excitement it had to play a top program like North Carolina. Coming off a year in which the Orange was at the bottom of the standings in the ACC, it’s had a much more successful 2015 campaign.However, Yelin stated the importance of getting excited not only to play, but beat the big teams. On Friday night, SU lost to the Tar Heels, three sets to one, at the Women’s Building.“All season we’ve said we cannot lose to the bottom teams, those teams we have to beat,” Yelin said. “The Louisville, Florida State, North Carolina teams, we’re hunting them.”The Tar Heels, who have several six-foot tall players, seemed to overpower the Orange. Nonetheless, Friday’s point leader, Leah Levert said she didn’t feel intimated by UNC.“I didn’t even realize they were big,” Levert said. “It doesn’t matter, my job is to block.”Yelin, who paused to let his players answer a question about the size of North Carolina’s first line, was happy to hear that his players didn’t feel intimidated.“If you’re intimidated by size or physical ability you’ve already lost. I was concerned,” Yelin said.The ball dropped to the court. Jalissa Trotter had her feet seemingly glued to the wood floor. The five Syracuse players on the floor stared at each other, not saying a word.Trotter wasn’t the only Syracuse player guilty of miscommunication; it was happening all night.Wlaszczuk had the second-lowest hitting percentage on the team and was making several unforced errors, missing serves and sets throughout the match.The team’s assist leader, who received a yellow card during the game, was not made available for comment by SU Athletics after the game.She was given the card after mocking the ref on what she felt was a missed touch of the net penalty on the Tar Heels. She got the card after several warnings from the referees.Wlaszczuk was then taken out of the game by Yelin for the first time all match, with fewer than five points remaining in the set.The frustration, Yelin said, was fueled by missed opportunities.“We missed a couple of great opportunities… in the most important points, we took a break.” Commentslast_img read more

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Syracuse men’s lacrosse heads to Georgia for ACC tournament as sport booms in area

first_img“(Banks) started one of the more prolific club teams in the country,” SU head coach John Desko said. “And as a result, he was somewhat of a Johnny Appleseed in the Georgia area.”The ties that Syracuse has in Georgia run deeper than just about any other college program and Banks is at the forefront of the movement. He’s also the vice president of the Blaze, the team that former Orange players Kevin Rice, Henry Schoonmaker and Nicky Galasso play for.Desko said when he recruits players from nontraditional places, it usually takes a year or two to get used to playing in SU’s schemes. Starting junior midfielder Sergio Salcido, from Florida, is an example the head coach points to. But freshman attack Nate Solomon, from Alpharetta, Georgia, who previously played for Banks, has three goals and two assists in very limited playing time this season.“It’s been growing and growing, getting better and better,” Desko said of the quality of youth lacrosse in Georgia, “and Solomon’s a result of that growth.”When Banks moved to Georgia nine years ago, this wasn’t his original plan. But he noticed the community was energetic about lacrosse and the level of coaching wasn’t as good as it could be.In order to push the region into an even more prominent position on the lacrosse recruiting map, Banks realized the area needed to attract teams to play near Atlanta. So LB3 started hosting the Cobb County Classic. Then Banks “worked my tail off” to attract the Blaze.Last year alone, 27 players involved with the LB3 lacrosse program went on to play in college.“Once players see lacrosse played at the highest level,” Banks said, “suddenly they want to be just like those guys.” Related Stories Syracuse men’s lacrosse roundtable: SU’s strategy for UNC, which player needs to step up and the goalie situationSyracuse’s man-up unit is having its best season in the last 35 years UPDATED: April 26, 2016 at 11:38 a.m.Just before his team took the makeshift lacrosse field at Citizens Bank Park, the Philadelphia Phillies home stadium, Liam Banks confronted one of his friends. Banks was coaching his club team, LB3 Atlanta, and his friend was coaching NXT, a top club in Philadelphia and the host of the event.“‘Please don’t embarrass me, I let you guys into this,’” Banks recalled his friend saying about three years ago.But a travel lacrosse team from Atlanta beating up on one from a traditional hotbed like Philadelphia was still an unusual thought.LB3’s opponent, St. Augustine Prep, scored the first goal. LB3 scored the next 16.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse assistant coach Kevin Donahue walked up to Banks after the game, the LB3 coach said. He complimented the LB3 players’ stick skills and lacrosse IQ. Banks, who played at SU for Donahue in the early 2000s, realized that was a turning point.“It was at that moment that I knew that all that hard work and things behind the scenes were starting to pay off,” Banks said, “and I knew we had something special down here.”Banks, who is also the chief executive officer of LB3, is one of the most influential people in lacrosse’s expansion into Georgia. He moved to the Peach State from Philadelphia nine years ago and has helped Atlanta become one of the fastest growing hotbeds for the sport.On Friday, No. 4 seed Syracuse (8-4, 2-2 Atlantic Coast) will take on top-seeded North Carolina (8-5, 3-1) in the first round of the ACC tournament on Friday at 6 p.m. and the game will take place in Kennesaw, Georgia, at Fifth Third Bank Stadium.It’s where Major League Lacrosse’s Atlanta Blaze played its inaugural game on Saturday, where the Orange played in the first- and second-ever Cobb County Classic and where national powerhouses Duke and Denver met earlier this season in the third-ever annual event hosted by LB3.RELATED STORIES:Men’s lacrosse beat writers discuss three questions surrounding SUSyracuse’s man-up unit is having its best season in 35 years Fifteen years ago, Jeff Wilks moved to Atlanta and eventually became a coach in the LB3 club. He had played lacrosse while growing up in Massachusetts but didn’t continue as a student at Syracuse. After moving to Atlanta, he met Banks and helped LB3 flourish.Back in 2001, there were only about eight programs in existence, Wilks said. Now, there are well over 100. And as more and more former players and coaches started living the area, the game became more and more popular.“‘If this game was around when I was growing up,’” Wilks recalled parents telling him, “‘I would have played it.’”The moment that Wilks points to when he realized lacrosse had made significant progress in Atlanta is when he was walking through a Dick’s Sporting Goods in 2009.Wilks saw SU midfielder Josh Amidon on a poster for STX lacrosse sticks, he said. It was only a small section in the store, but it had a lasting effect.“I was like, ‘Holy cow, they’re selling lacrosse sticks in Dick’s in Georgia.’”Seven years later, the lacrosse section in Dick’s is as large as ever. And with the ACC tournament coming to Kennesaw starting on Friday, the rising hotbed is the stage for the nation’s best conference.Atlanta still has a long way to go, in talent and in history, to match places like Baltimore, central New York and Long Island. But for the time being, Atlanta’s lacrosse scene is growing fast and furious.“It’s coming faster than people think,” Banks said. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 26, 2016 at 1:11 am Contact Paul: pmschwed@syr.edu | @pschweds Matt Hankin | Design Editorlast_img read more

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No. 8 Syracuse escapes upset bid from No. 11 Cornell with a 4-0, 2nd half run

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ With seven seconds left in the first half and SU trailing 5-4, junior Neena Merola fired at the Cornell goalie, Renee Poullott, who blocked the shot. Junior Riley Donahue scooped up the ball and turned toward the net. She rifled a shot past Poullott and tied the game at five. Merola ran to Donahue and started the group hug while junior Alie Jimerson raised her arms in celebration.“Neena Merola (had) a really hard, good take,” Donahue said. “Time was running out, so it was good just to get a shot off. I just happened to be in the right position and saw an open net.”No. 8 Syracuse (13-4, 5-1 Atlantic Coast) came back in the second half to stave off an upset bid from No. 11 Cornell (10-3, 5-0 Ivy), 11-7, on Tuesday night in the Carrier Dome. In the second half, SU capitalized on the key moments it failed to convert in the first. The Orange also used a four-goal run to pull away from a Big Red team that, until then, always seemed to have an answer.“They’re (Cornell) very tricky,” SU head coach Gary Gait said. “Sometimes they play man-to-man and then they drop into a zone. Just when you start getting comfortable playing man-to-man, they change.”In the first half, SU failed to capitalize on any of its scoring opportunities.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn the first ten minutes of the game, the Orange went 1-for-9 on shots. In almost two minutes during that time, five shots were on goal. Two were saved by Poullott and the other three flew wide or high. Jimerson came the closest to making it in, but the the ball clanged off the top post and flew out.Yet, less than a minute into the second half, it seemed SU had figured out Cornell’s strategy. Attack Devon Parker caught a pass from Donahue and hit the bottom corner of the net. Jimerson jumped on Parker to celebrate SU’s first lead of the game.“Sometimes we come into the first half and get a little in our own head,” Parker said, “and we forget how to run our offense. Sometimes it takes that halftime speech, like a new play drawn on the board, to pull it out and take the smarts that we have to put it in the back of the net. That’s what happened in the second half.”Cornell tied the game again five minutes later on a tally by Sarah Phillips, but SU swiftly answered with a 4-0 scoring run in 5:27 to cement the Orange’s lead.Jimerson, assisted by Mary Rahal, had the first of the four goals when she fired the ball past the goalie’s hip and into the net. Donahue followed up with a solo act. The junior attack then connected with Jimerson, who found the top twine. Rahal then finished the run herself by beating her defender from behind the net to give herself a high-percentage look in front of the crease.“That was a really good Cornell team,” Gait said “and we knew they were good. They certainly … gave us a battle.” Comments Published on April 18, 2017 at 11:15 pm Contact Kaci: klwasile@syr.edulast_img read more

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Tyson Bomberry’s versatility shines at 2nd defender spot

first_img Published on April 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Facebook Twitter Google+ UPDATED: August 8, 2017 at 7:34 p.m.DURHAM, N.C. — Tyson Bomberry’s first shot on Friday night sailed well over the crossbar, beyond a fence and into a parking lot adjacent to Cameron Indoor Stadium. It epitomized No. 1 Syracuse’s first half, marked by struggles at the X, defensive lapses and offensive stagnancy.Bomberry’s second shot came at a much different moment in No. 1 seed SU’s 16-15 loss to No. 4 seed North Carolina at Koskinen Stadium in the ACC tournament semifinal. Amid SU’s 8-0 run in the second half, Bomberry played give-and-go with long-stick midfielder Andrew Helmer. With his previous shot in mind, Bomberry made a clear effort to shoot at a lower angle. The ball headed straight to the top shelf, pulling SU within one of UNC headed into the fourth quarter. The play highlighted Bomberry’s knack for getting out in transition and being more than just a defender on the country’s top-ranked team.The Orange (11-2, 4-0 Atlantic Coast) lost to the Tar Heels (7-7, 1-3) and snapped its nine-game winning streak. Among a number of positives from the game — the third-quarter comeback, Jordan Evans’ career-high six assists and a flurry of goals from Nick Mariano (three) and Sergio Salcido (three) — was Bomberry’s effort on the defensive end, which has not gone unnoticed by those around him. His versatility has continued to shine at the second defender spot in recent weeks, Friday included.“He’s really well-rounded,” SU head coach John Desko said. “He’s good in the team defense. He’s good in the individual defense. He’s great in loose ball situations. He’s not afraid to run over with it. And he’s a good shooter.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDesko’s comments encompass Bomberry’s greatest asset to Syracuse: versatility. The sophomore close defender, who works alongside No. 1 defender Scott Firman, checks in second to only senior faceoff specialist Ben Williams in ground balls (34) and tied-first with Firman in caused turnovers (13). In practice, he’s used on the wings, not only defensively, because “he’s such a good ground ball guy,” Desko said.He grabs passes in the air with regularity and often finds himself in good sliding spots. He has no glaring weakness, players note.Growing up, Bomberry took faceoffs, played attack, ran at midfield and spent time on defense. He also dabbled in football as a middle linebacker and wrestling. On Friday, Bomberry flashed his strength — bodying up UNC’s Chris Cloutier and Luke Goldstock — which he says is a product of his diverse athletic background.“He’s taken away most of their attackmen,” said senior midfielder Nick Mariano, who has a team-high 32 goals. “He’s got one of the best sticks I’ve ever seen. He picks off passes or bats them down almost every time the ball’s in the air or near him.”There are still some lapses. In the first half against the Tar Heels, Bomberry made a couple mistakes that cost SU. He guessed wrong on a pass, coming off the low corner too soon. He was then late to get the crease, where Goldstock had camped out. Goldstock scored easily.With Syracuse down 10-2 early in the second, Bomberry watched a rebound float in the air. Rather than turning his body and jumping out to an open Cloutier, who scored three times, Bomberry ball watched. Cloutier found the ball a few seconds later and converted a wide-open shot.But later, Bomberry scored to bring SU within one with his transition goal. He has practically mastered the art of the clear, teammates said, because he picks the ball up, keeps his head up and looks to run before the defense sets up. On Friday, he scooped up a ground ball to give Syracuse the final possession and a chance to tie the game in the final seconds.“Tyson’s got a great stick,” said SU assistant coach and defensive guru Lelan Rogers. “With Tyson and Scottie (Firman), they’re not amazing athletes but they have great stick skills.”Generally, Bomberry lets the player he’s guarding dictate his movements. He reads the hips, throws a bump check, then goes from there — he trusts his quick feet enough to compensate for attacks’ quick first steps. The bump check, he said, “makes them decide what they’re going to do first, six feet in front of me. Then I get more time to react.”“I know firsthand from practice, he’s really tough to beat,” said his cousin and junior midfielder Brendan Bomberry, who ranks second on SU in goals (23). “He’s got probably the best stick in the entire country. Every single day he’s picking off passes left and right. That’s huge for our defense.”Bomberry has made sizeable progression on the Syracuse defensive line and figures to take the No. 1 defender spot in 2018, with the graduation of Firman. For now, he’s a key cog in an SU defense coming off its worst game of the season.“He’s just huge, big, athletic,” North Carolina head coach Joe Breschi said. “He’s a physical presence in there. Ground balls, his presence, physicality and playing with an edge makes him a special player.” Commentslast_img read more

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What Syracuse Football’s depth chart means entering Week 1

first_imgHere’s a look at what some of the chart means going into the Orange’s season-opener Friday night against Central Connecticut State in the Carrier Dome.QuarterbackThis is Eric Dungey’s offense and that was never in question, but his concussion history and tendency to extend plays out of the pocket made the battle for the second-string spot a storyline in camp. Senior Zach Mahoney won the job over true freshman Tommy DeVito, a four-star recruit and Elite Eleven quarterback. Mahoney, originally a walk-on after a season in junior college, has started seven career games including the final three of 2016.Head coach Dino Babers said last week that should Dungey go down, the quarterback that puts the team in the best position to win would play. “Burning” DeVito’s redshirt year wasn’t a concern if he would be the best option. It will be interesting to see if things change should Dungey suffer an injury early in the season.Wide Receiver 2Redshirt junior Jamal Custis earned the other outside spot opposite senior receiver Steve Ishmael.Custis redshirted last season after a high ankle sprain sidelined him early on, so this will be the first look at him in Babers’ offense. Someone will have to step up to replace Amba Etta-Tawo’s 94 receptions from 2016. Custis gets the first crack at being the guy. At 6-foot-5, he figures to be a solid option in the red zone.Custis took the job over sophomore Devin C. Butler, who missed the second half of last season because of injury and recorded two catches in limited action before that. He played some running back in spring practice.Nose TackleIn somewhat of a surprise, redshirt junior Kayton Samuels will start instead of sophomore McKinley Williams. Babers didn’t go into much detail regarding his thought-process behind the choice, but said Samuels had a strong camp. Samuels played in 10 games last season and started five, while Williams started one but played in all 12.CornerbackSU had a lot of options here, some more experienced and some young. Two sophomores, redshirt Christopher Frederick and Scoop Bradshaw, earned the starting nods. Graduate transfer Jordan Martin was expected to compete for a spot but moved to safety during camp.Frederick, now wearing No. 3, started the second half of last year and tallied 22 tackles. Bradshaw’s contributions as a true freshman last year were mostly on special teams.Jessica Sheldon | Staff PhotographerPunt ReturnStarting free safety Antwan Cordy was listed as the only option. Cordy, a redshirt junior, suffered a forearm injury Week 3 against Louisville and missed the rest of the 2016 campaign.Cordy’s athleticism — he’s totaled 13 tackles for loss in his career — will help him in this role. His importance to the defense adds a wrinkle of intrigue to the decision to put him out in the open field.LinebackerNo surprise here in that seniors Parris Bennett, Zaire Franklin and Jonathan Thomas will start, but it’s worth keeping an eye on how SU will try to get snaps for the rest of the unit. Graduate transfer Austin Valdez put up big numbers in 2015 under Babers at Bowling Green, and he’s behind Franklin at middle linebacker. Kielan Whitner, second on the strong side after Thomas, has converted from safety and could be especially useful in coverage situations.The story has been updated with appropriate style.  Comments UPDATED: Aug. 28, 2017 at 5:35 p.m.Syracuse football on Monday released its Week 1 depth chart, offering the first look at how position battles played out in preseason camp. Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on August 28, 2017 at 1:50 pm Contact: jtbloss@syr.edu | @jtblosslast_img read more

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Syracuse rises one spot to No. 7 in men’s soccer rankings

first_img Published on September 5, 2017 at 2:47 pm Contact Nick: nialvare@syr.edu | @nick_a_alvarez Facebook Twitter Google+ After drawing with Princeton and defeating Northwestern last weekend, Syracuse (3-0-1) rose one spot to No. 7 in the United Soccer Coaches rankings Tuesday morning.Seven other Atlantic Coast Conference schools join SU in the top 25, including No. 2 Wake Forest, No. 3 Clemson, No. 6 Notre Dame, No. 8 Louisville, No. 10 North Carolina and SU’s opponent this Friday, No. 11 Virginia.The Cavaliers (3-0) are coming off a 2-1 overtime win Monday night against North Carolina Wilmington. Friday’s matchup marks the start of conference play for both teams.The Orange almost suffered its first loss of the season against Princeton Friday afternoon before John-Austin Ricks scored in the 84th minute to tie the game at one. The goal came when SU was a man-down, an area it has excelled in through four games.Syracuse’s offense scored early and often on Sunday night, defeating Northwestern 3-1 and improving to 244-16-7 when scoring three goals or more in a match. Junior forward Adnan Bakalovic opened the scoring less than a minute into the match when he tapped in a low-cross from freshman Tajon Buchanan. Junior midfielder Jonathan Hagman and Buchanan added the second and third goals, respectively. Comments AdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

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With 8 foreign-born players, Syracuse overcomes language barriers

first_imgSyracuse head coach Ange Bradley barked instructions to senior Lies Lagerweij from the sidelines.“Pressure,” Bradley yelled at Lagerweij. “Pressure.”Lagerweij received the message and relayed instructions to fellow All-American, Roos Weers. But instead of English, Lagerweij repeated the instructions in Dutch, the pair’s native language. She then yelled, “pressure” audibly to the rest of the team.No. 10 Syracuse (11-5, 2-4 Atlantic Coast Conference) has eight foreign athletes on the team. Seven come from the Netherlands or Germany and do not speak English as a first language. Elaine Carey, an Irish native, is the one foreign player that speaks English as a first language.“That’s the biggest adaptation that’s cultural,” Bradley said. “… Having to do something in a language that’s not your own. Think if you had to read all your books for your classes in Dutch.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAmerican field hockey is much faster and more physical than European field hockey, Bradley said. But in addition to adapting to American styles of play, SU’s foreign players must adjust to playing with people who speak a different language.For many, the adjustment to playing on a predominantly English-speaking team and adjusting to an American style of play has been a challenge, but it is also challenging for the American players adjusting to foreign languages and playing styles.Erin Gillingham, a midfielder, plays close to the back line around Weers, Lagerweij and Dutch goalie Borg van der Velde. She hears them strategizing in Dutch every game.“I have no idea what they’re saying,” Gillingham said. “As long as they get their point across to each other and they know what they’re talking about, then that’s all that matters.”Gillingham has yet to have a teammate try to talk to her in a foreign language on or off the field, but she’s heard stories of it.“They don’t even know that they’re doing it,” Gillingham said. “And that’s the funny part.”Unlike Gillingham, senior midfielder Laura Hurff has been barked at in an unrecognizable tongue, but it didn’t come off the field, it came in the thick of a heated game. While on defense, Dutch freshman Florine Hogendoorn began directing Hurff. She yelled “Go to the ball! Go to the ball!” But Hogendoorn didn’t realize she was hollering in Dutch.“I was like, ‘What? What are you saying?’” Hurff said. “And she kept saying it over and over.”Five minutes later, during a break in the action, Hogendoorn ran up to Hurff and apologized. She had just realized that she was speaking in Dutch and not English.Think if you had to read all your books for your classes in Dutch.Ange BradleyEuropean field hockey isn’t as physical or as fast as the American style. The game is much more tactical and the experience runs deeper. Many players, such as junior Emma Tufts, adjusted to field hockey after originally playing ice hockey. Foreign players don’t usually share that common experience. Hogendoorn had dreamed of playing field hockey in America for as long as she could remember.“(European players) bring a lot of knowledge to us,” Hurff said. “… They start at a younger age, so they’re really good at reading the game.”Often, when those players read the game and talk about it, the discussions are not in English. In the middle of games, it is easier for many of the players to work together in their own languages, Weers and Hoogendoorn said. For them, if it would be more effective to give directions to each other in Dutch, they’ll do it in Dutch.Speaking in one’s native language brings back a sense of familiarity for the German and Dutch players. But to Bradley, it isn’t a Dutch, German, Irish or American style that matters.“It’s still the same game,” Bradley said. “Played with a white ball and turf.” Comments Published on October 23, 2017 at 9:39 pm Contact Matt: mdliberm@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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‘If I get it going like this, I’m going to be a problem’: Matt Moyer’s career game pushes Syracuse past UConn, 72-63

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on December 6, 2017 at 12:01 am Contact Sam: sjfortie@syr.edu | @Sam4TR NEW YORK — The 3-point attempt clanged off the far end of the rim and bounced high off the backboard, back toward the right corner from where it came. But then a large right hand appeared from seemingly nowhere and altered the ball’s trajectory.Syracuse’s redshirt freshman forward Matthew Moyer had taken flight, seemingly sitting on the backs of Connecticut guard Christian Vital and forward Eric Cobb when he slammed down the monstrous put-back dunk.“Coach (Jim Boeheim) always tells me to go to the glass,” Moyer said. “If I do that, I have a chance to get buckets. If I get one bucket, it’s going to get me in the flow of the game. … If I get it going like this, I’m going to be a problem for a lot of teams.”In the Orange’s seven previous games this season, Moyer scored 17 points. On Tuesday night, Moyer had 18 in a career performance that keyed Syracuse (7-1) to a 72-63 victory over Connecticut (6-3) in the Jimmy V Classic in Madison Square Garden. He also chipped in eight rebounds and a steal, while turning it over twice. The night held special importance to Moyer, he said, because it was his father’s birthday on Monday, and both parents watched the game sitting just behind the Orange’s bench.Moyer was an unlikely hero to save Syracuse as it struggled on offense, with point guard Frank Howard shooting 1-for-10 with nine turnovers, and wasn’t at full strength, with Boeheim holding freshman center Bourama Sidibe out in the second half because of an ankle injury. Yet without Moyer’s play, Boeheim said, the Orange likely would have lost. Tyus Battle, SU’s star guard and Moyer’s roommate, said he’s prepared to hear about the dunk “for a while.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWhen asked about what made this game different for Moyer, Boeheim said, “I have no clue. He’s been horrible all year. And that’s being nice. I’m being nice. ‘Horrible’ is a nice word for what he’s done. He was a terrific player tonight, and I think he can build on this.”A seldom-used player on offense, Moyer nearly eclipsed his previous career-high of 11 points in the first half. He finished the frame with 10, adding another dunk, a 3-pointer and a free throw enabled by effectively exploiting the baseline, which Boeheim said he needs to when defenses focus on Howard or Battle or active, long freshman forward Oshae Brissett.On the first possession of the game, Moyer started his own offense with defense. Moyer stole the ball, but then, down the floor, traveled. Boeheim wildly pointed and screamed at Moyer, a familiar sight. The turnover seemed to doom the forward to a quick hook he’s become accustomed to this season. It didn’t, and a few plays later, Moyer finished a contested layup to jumpstart his scoring spree.“I love the travel, actually,” Moyer said. “The travel was awesome for me. I got the ball and said, ‘You know what? I need to be aggressive and go. It doesn’t matter if you turn it over, just get it and go.’”Moyer added: “I’m a freshman. I’m young. Coach needs to build more trust in me. If I make mistakes, I’m not going to play as much, but if I go back in there and make an impact immediately, then he’ll let me play.”After the first half, Moyer seemed to cool considerably. Moyer grabbed an offensive rebound but missed the put-back and when he got to the free-throw line, he missed one and made one. Battle reassumed his normal duties carrying the offensive load — he finished with 22 points on 8-for-18 shooting — as he maintained Syracuse’s lead. It stretched to 17 late in the first half, but the pesky Huskies continued chipping away and slowly inched back into the game. Syracuse’s advantage hovered between seven and 14 throughout the half.Then, with 10 minutes to go, Moyer reawakened.Off a rare miss from Jalen Adams, UConn’s star junior guard who finished with 22 points, Moyer snared a defensive rebound and started a break. A few seconds later, Moyer threw down the second of his three dunks and flexed just as he had on the tip-back.Late in the half, UConn head coach Kevin Ollie became frustrated his team wasn’t chipping away further at Syracuse’s lead. Ollie stamped into the court so hard it could be heard all the way across the Garden. The Huskies closed in, whittling Syracuse’s lead down to eight with two minutes to go.The crowd rose, sensing it might be UConn’s last push. Battle, hoping to quiet them, rose up for a 3-pointer. It clanked off the rim and, almost eerily, Moyer again started running from about 15 feet, skied in and put down another put-back dunk.“I was like, ‘Nobody’s blocking me out?’” Moyer said. “Are you serious? I think I boosted off somebody. I was like whoa! (The dunk) just flowed out of me.”Syracuse’s lead was pushed out of reach when, on defense, Moyer nabbed another steal. To cap a career night, he slammed again with under a minute remaining to remove any doubt from the game’s final result. The flush bookended the night for Moyer and Syracuse, and it finally pushed away a Huskies team that, until the final possession, gave the Orange all it could handle.After the game, a large media scrum formed around Moyer in the locker room. The forward smiled and laughed. Boeheim walked by and said, “Nobody’s talked to you all year. Why’re they doing (it) now?”The group turned to Boeheim, who added before walking out: “They love you when you’re going good.”The media turned back. Moyer looked down. He laughed a little softer this time.“Anyways,” he said. “That was crazy.” Commentslast_img read more

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Badgers look to rebound after road loss

first_imgLed by senior forward Laurie Nosbuch, the Badgers began September with a four-game road trip and won its first three by a combined score of 7-2, but Wisconsin dropped the final leg to in-state foe UW-Milwaukee, 2-1, in overtime.[/media-credit]Golden opportunities must be taken advantage of when presented. The Wisconsin women’s soccer team just missed out on a perfect four-game road trip and a five-game winning streak on Sunday. The Badgers (5-2-0) fell at the hands of the No. 17 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Panthers, 2-1 in overtime.The Badgers may have entered the week ranked for the first time this season had they prevailed, earning 19 votes in Tuesday’s NSCAA weekly top 25 poll, despite the loss.“Going forward it gives us a little more motivation to get a win,” senior forward Laurie Nosbusch said. “Any time you lose you kind of get a little bit of a chip on your shoulder and want to make sure you win the next one.”Wednesday evening gives the road-tested Badgers a reprieve from traveling with a home matchup against the Central Michigan Chippewas at the McClimon Complex.“I think it is important to reflect and watch film and see the mistakes that we have made, learn from those mistakes and then move on and refocus yourself for the next game,” senior goalkeeper Michele Dalton said, after what she called a great practice. “[The mistakes] are important learning tools for us, but moving forward we need to refocus ourselves, but not necessarily completely forget the mistakes we have made, just learn from them and build off of them.”A key for Wisconsin will be to jump on the Chippewas early. Both of the Badgers’ losses this year have occurred when the opponent was first to score, and the same is true for Central Michigan whose lone loss came when Kentucky look a 1-0 lead into the locker room at halftime.Central Michigan (5-1-1) was already tested against a Big Ten foe on Sunday, fighting for a 1-1 tie in double overtime against the Michigan Wolverines.As the West division leaders of the Mid-American Conference, the Chippewas appear ready to give the Badgers everything they can handle Wednesday. In its many close games, Central Michigan is only allowing an average of 0.57 goals per game, a number the Badgers will surely have to top to come away with a victory.“The key is focusing on getting services into the box and getting a little more creative and aggressive,” Nosbusch said of the Badgers’ offense.The fact that both squads are entering Wednesday’s contest coming off overtime games makes for common ground for both opponents, and should this game go into overtime as well, Dalton is prepared to do what it takes to win.“[Winning overtime games] comes down to effort and drive,” Dalton said. “The team at the end of the game that is most willing to put forth that extra effort when you’re tired mentally and physically exhausted is usually the team that comes out the winner.”Recent overtime games are not the only thing these two teams have in common. The Badgers and Chippewas both boast a freshman as their leading goal and point scorers.After winning Big Ten Freshman of the Week in the season opener, forward Cara Walls has been carrying the Wisconsin offense with four goals and nine points, and Laura Gosse leads Central Michigan with three goals and six points despite only starting one game thus far in the season.While the contest may seem like an everyday non-conference matchup, Wisconsin is looking at this game as a must-win. This is not only a time to correct the mistakes made against Milwaukee, but also to gain positive momentum as they head into the Big Ten season.It will be a difficult Big Ten schedule right out of the gates.Defending co-Big Ten Champion Penn State will come to Madison Saturdayafternoon for a game that could have a large impact on how the rest ofthe Big Ten season will go for Wisconsin, and following that UW will hita Michigan road trip, visiting the Spartans and Wolverines thefollowing weekend.“[This game is] not just for statistics purposes, it’s just for morale more than anything,” Dalton said. “I think the team really needs to win at this point. Sunday was a hard loss for us, it really was. I struggled with it, but we need to move on and refocus ourselves for this game. … Pulling out a victory in this game would be huge for us for NCAA purposes going forward and overall morale going into the Big Ten this coming weekend.”last_img read more

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Badgers fail to contain Sullinger, go cold from outside

first_imgWith Ohio State coming to town, Wisconsin knew its biggest priority would be shutting down All-American forward Jared Sullinger.But that didn’t happen, as the No. 20 Badgers (18-6, 7-4) frequently allowed Sullinger to get the ball in comfortable position in the paint during Saturday afternoon’s 58-52 loss to the No. 3 Buckeyes (20-3, 8-2) at the Kohl Center. Sullinger finished with 24 points on 8-of-16 shooting and also pulled down 10 rebounds for his 10th double-double of the season.Forward Jared Berggren, listed at 6-foot-10, 235 pounds, guarded the 6-foot-9, 280-pound Sullinger for much of the first half, in which Sullinger scored 16 of Ohio State’s 28 points. In the second half, the combination of forward Mike Bruesewitz and guard/forward Ryan Evans was used more frequently in an attempt to limit Sullinger from getting the ball in the paint.“Well, I just wanted people who wanted to move their feet and not allow a pass to enter the post,” head coach Bo Ryan said of using Bruesewitz and Evans on Sullinger. “That was an easy decision. How many post touches did he have after that”?Trailing 28-24 at halftime, Wisconsin’s biggest deficit came at the 12:23 mark in the second half following a pair of Sullinger free throws. Berggren played the first seven minutes of the second half, went to the bench for two minutes and then returned at the 10:16 mark. He subbed out at the 7:39 mark and did not return for the remainder of the game, finishing with 10 points on 4-of-8 shooting, three rebounds and two blocks.“At the start of the game, I didn’t do a good job of limiting [Sullinger’s] touches,” Berggren said. “I let him get a couple easy ones early and that set the tone from there. A great player like him, once he gets a little bit of confidence, he’s hard to stop. A lot of it came early on, I let him get going and I’ve got to take a little blame for myself for that one.”Only two other players scored in double-digits for the Buckeyes – forward Deshaun Thomas with 16 points and guard William Buford scored 11 – as the majority of the OSU offense ran through Sullinger. Although the switch to Evans and Bruesewitz was noticeable, Ryan denied any intentional shift in Wisconsin’s game plan.“I’m not going to sell out any particular players or anything, but if anybody thinks that’s what we said we’re going to do coming into that game, then you weren’t at practices watching what was going on,” Ryan said.“We did not play him differently by assignment, by scouting report or anything else. It’s about execution. Some of those teams that doubled him paid – big time. It’s tough to say that we changed what we were doing. The instructions were the same.”Badgers stubbornly inefficient from outsideWisconsin was also consistent with its game plan on the offensive end Saturday afternoon.Despite shooting 2-for-14 from 3-point range in the first half, the Badgers attempted 13 more in the second and made just three. Ultimately, UW finished 5-for-27 (18.5 percent) from behind the arc, stunningly poor for a team that entered the weekend third in the Big Ten in three-point shooting at 36.6 percent.Although they didn’t fall often, Ryan said he liked the looks Wisconsin got from outside.“I thought they shut off stuff going to the rim, and so then you’ve got to go to what’s next, and that’s either kick across or kick out,” he said. “I liked the looks.”Just as the Badgers’ overall offense was balanced – four players scored in double figures – so was their tendency to shoot away from deep. Bruesewitz, who finished third with 11 points, was 1-for-6 from outside. Berggren was 2-for-6 from outside, and point guard Jordan Taylor was 1-for-4. Evans led UW in scoring with 14 points and was 0-2 from outside.“Everybody was getting open looks, we’ve got to knock them down,” Bruesewitz said. “We did a good job moving the ball, Jordan did a great job putting us in position. They were trying to take away him off of ball screens, he did a good job of getting rid of the ball when he needed to.”On Wisconsin’s first possession alone, the Badgers attempted two three-pointers as Berggren missed from deep and Evans corralled the offensive rebound. Taylor nailed a trey to give the Badgers a 3-2 lead, and then Berggren sunk another on their next possession. That three-pointer came at the 17:53 mark, and it was the last UW made in the first half.In the second, the Badgers missed their first three three-point attempts before Berggren made one with 15:35 left. That made the score 32-31 in favor of Ohio State, and it was the closest Wisconsin would come to the lead until 3:46, when a three by Bruesewitz narrowed the Buckeyes’ lead to 51-50.The bucket appeared to give Wisconsin legitimate momentum heading into the game’s final minutes as the Kohl Center was once again electrified, but the Badgers didn’t score until Taylor converted a layup with 43 seconds remaining.“I don’t know if it was an inability, I think we just – especially early in the first half – we missed Berggren and Ryan and myself, other guys in the post a little bit,” Bruesewitz said. “I think we needed to look inside a little bit, especially since our threes weren’t falling for us.”last_img read more

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