Target: Climate change

first_imgExperts from the worlds of science, government, economics, business, and history will gather in Sanders Theatre on April 13 at 4 p.m. for a wide-ranging panel discussion on how society in general and universities in particular can best confront the perils posed by climate change, Harvard President Drew Faust announced today.The discussion, to be introduced by Faust and moderated by Charlie Rose of CBS and PBS, will bring together President Barack Obama’s principal science adviser, the co-chair of a major international climate change group, and five leading scholars prominent in seeking solutions to climate change.“As a scientific consensus has firmly established, climate change presents one of the world’s most urgent and demanding challenges. All of us share an interest and responsibility in confronting that reality and pursuing effective solutions,” said Faust, who on March 17 delivered an address on climate change at Tsinghua University in Beijing.“I am pleased we will have the benefit of such a distinguished group of panelists to elevate attention to the need for action and to spur us all to focus even more intently on how society and universities, in particular, can rise to the challenge,” Faust added. “We have an extraordinary range of efforts already underway across Harvard, and the magnitude and complexity of the problem demand that we do even more.”Panelists are expected to include:Joseph Aldy, assistant professor of public policy, Harvard Kennedy School; former special assistant to the president for energy and environment, the White House.Christopher Field, co-chair, Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; founding director, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science; Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Stanford University; member, Harvard University Board of Overseers; Harvard ’75.Rebecca Henderson. McArthur University Professor, Harvard University; co-director, Business and Environment Initiative, Harvard Business School.John Holdren, assistant to the president for science and technology, the White House; co-chair, President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology; former Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy, Harvard Kennedy School; former professor of environmental science and public policy, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University.Richard Newell, Gendell Professor of Energy and Environmental Economics, Duke University; director, Duke University Energy Initiative; former administrator, U.S. Energy Information Administration; former senior economist for energy and environment, President’s Council of Economic Advisers; Harvard Ph.D. ’97.Naomi Oreskes, professor of the history of science and director of graduate studies, Department of the History of Science, Harvard University; co-author of “Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming.”Daniel Schrag, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, professor of environmental science and engineering, and director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment, Harvard University.In recent years, the University has substantially broadened and deepened its research and educational programs focused on climate change and on energy and the environment. Most recently, the University announced the first recipients of grants from the President’s Climate Change Solutions Fund, intended to catalyze a new generation of efforts to accelerate the transition to renewable sources of energy.Last year, Harvard created a secondary field in energy and environment for undergraduates and launched the Center for Green Buildings and Cities at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Across Harvard’s 13 Schools there are 239 faculty conducting research related to climate, energy, and the environment, and 243 courses are offered to students covering the topics of energy, the environment, or sustainability.Showcasing such efforts in scholarship and thinking related to climate change, the Harvard University Center for the Environment will host a series of events during the week of April 6–10.In addition to research and education, Harvard continues strong progress toward meeting its aggressive goal for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and building a healthier, more sustainable campus.Last year, Harvard Management Company joined the Carbon Disclosure Project’s climate change program, intended to drive environmental disclosure and performance of publicly listed companies, while also becoming the first university endowment to adopt the United Nations-supported Principles for Responsible Investment.Please click here to request a ticket for the event.last_img read more

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Sister interprets the ‘good’

first_imgSister Joan Chittister, a Benedictine sister and author of 45 books, discussed the common good during the annual Fr. Bernie Clarke Lecture on Catholic Social Tradition on Monday night in the Hesburgh Library auditorium. “Tonight I want to spend a little time sorting out … the whole concept of ‘the common good,’” she said. Chittister said celebrating the 50th anniversary of the encyclical “Pacem en Terris” brings people to the very heart of what it means not only to be a Christian or a Catholic, but also to be a citizen of the United States.”In every single presidential election cycle, we enter as a people into the centrifuge of one of the oldest debates and at the same time one of the most pressing contemporary questions in the life of this country,” she said. “That question is what exactly as a people are we about? Is such a think as the common good even possible in a world such as ours?” Chittister said in “Pacem in Terris”, Pope John XIII does not talk about peace in terms of war or weapons of mass destruction, but in terms of the common good. “In 176 paragraphs of that encyclical, he talks 48 times about the common good,” she said. “Without the common good, there will never be peace and certainly no justice.” Chittister said the issue of the common good even divided Alexis de Tocqueville and James Madison on the question of what the common good is and how to obtain it. “[The common good] riveted the Founding Fathers 200 years ago and it clearly confuses this session of Congress,” she said. “It has plagued political philosophers and economists across centuries and it continues to do so to this very day.” The common good is the holy grail of politics, Chittister said. “The common good is a vision of public virtue, which engages the individual citizen, energizes the government, shapes the public system and points the public direction and all it’s policies, all it’s institutions and all it’s legislative intents,” Chittister said. “The common good is the answer to the question, what, that we all want for this country … what is it that we really want for this country and how do we go about getting it.” Chittister said now the discourse in the U.S. is more inclined to talk about the general good instead of the common good. “We talk about the public good, meaning natural gifts that benefit us all equally, like air, water and good order if of course we have the good fortune to find air that is pure, water that is clean and land that is toxin free, resources that are sufficient to afford anywhere,” she said. There is no doubt the common good is an endangered species, Chittister said. Chittister said the world is changing through globalization with more diversity present in religion, nations and neighborhoods. What once divided people – language, geography – no longer do so, she said. “‘Pacem in Terris’ gets clearer everyday,” she said. “The fact that one is a citizen of a particular state does not detract from anyway from his of her membership in the human family as a whole or from their citizenship in the world community.” Contact Anna Boarini at aboari01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

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Shamrock Series offers volunteer opportunities

first_imgFans will travel to Dallas this weekend to cheer for the Irish in this year’s Shamrock Series game against Arizona State, and a group of Notre Dame alumni and friends plan to make a lasting impact on a Texas charity while they are in town. Alumni Association President Erin O’Connor French and spiritual director Angie Appleby Purcell collaborated with Catholic Charities USA to bring volunteers to the Assessment Center of Tarrant County in Fort Worth, Texas, Purcell said. Participants will renovate the building and support the children served at the Center by painting walls, building picnic tables and offering monetary donations.  Purcell said the Alumni Association organizes volunteer events annually to coincide with Shamrock Series games and Notre Dame’s bowl games to show generosity to the extended community beyond campus.  “Other folks, other teams and other people may be gathering for the social aspect, which of course we are too, but for Notre Dame it is very important for us to give back to the local community, particularly to those who are needy,” Purcell said. When the Notre Dame community travels together, they hope to leave the place in a better state than when they arrived, French said.  “This is a way for us to make a long-lasting impact … and make it worth-while for them to host Notre Dame and to leave a positive impact on those communities,” French said. The beneficiary of this project, the Assessment Center of Tarrant County, serves as a home for children under the age of 17 who have been taken from their parents for child welfare concerns, French said.  “Its primary goal is to not only house these children in a safe environment, but it is a very holistic approach to their education, to their psychological well-being, to their health, to their safety, with the goal being for these children to be reunited with their families,” Purcell said. In line with this holistic approach, while the volunteers work on the building, the children will receive tours of Dallas Stadium, and many will attend the game as well, she said. “With children whose lives are really in turmoil and have faced far more obstacles and challenges in life than they should, we are hoping for an afternoon or weekend in which they can just be kids again and not have any worries other than just to have fun,” Purcell said. French said the actual physical effort of the volunteers would go towards improving the comfort and atmosphere of the children’s temporary home.  “What we’re trying to do is make it less clinical, less sterile and more home-like for these children,” she said. “It’s a tumultuous time for them, and a lot of them are quite young … so we’re going to paint and make it more home-like. We hope to do some planting work out in the outside of the building [and] we will work on the recess play areas for them depending on the number of volunteers.” Purcell said members of the Notre Dame community who cannot travel to Texas could still participate by donating $25 to sponsor a “welcome kit” for an incoming child.  “Children who are coming to this center usually are coming with little or not much with them, so the welcome kits that the center offers children as they come is all that the children have to start with,” she said. “That includes … all the things that a child both literally needs but also some support and something fun that they may not have coming with them.”  “It’s kind of a two-tiered approach for how to engage our alumni community … both physical labor-wise but also in terms of donating for the welcome kit.” The Alumni Association chose the Assessment Center because of its affiliation with Catholic Charities USA, with whom Notre Dame shares a connection as a partner and collaborator, Purcell said.  “We just thought it would be a great opportunity not only to serve the children who are themselves worthy of our time and energy, but also because we want to strengthen and unify our partnership as two pretty important Catholic institutions to help the common good,” Purcell said.  Any students traveling to the game who want to volunteer may sign up in the Worthington Renaissance Hotel, from which the Alumni Association will provide transportation, or show up at the Assessment Center of Tarrant County where the volunteering will take place from 2 to 5 p.m. Friday.last_img read more

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Smart About Solar’ series announced for March

first_imgWILLISTON, Vermont . . . February 24, 2011 . . . AllEarth Renewables, Inc.,With energy prices on the rise, Vermont Yankee’s license expiring in 2012, and recent instability in the Middle East, Williston-based AllEarth Renewables is hosting an energy series in five local communities this March.The ‘Smart About Solar’ series, which will focus how Vermonters can protect themselves against the rising cost of energy, will be held in Chittenden County and northern Addison County communities throughout the month of March.The events begin at 7 pm and will be held in Charlotte, Shelburne, Hinesburg, Vergennes and Starksboro.  They are free, open to the public, and include refreshments.The solar series events are:Charlotte: Wednesday, March 2nd at 7:00 p.m. – Charlotte Central School Library, 408 Hinesburg Road, Charlotte with presenter David Blittersdorf, president/CEO of AllEarth RenewablesShelburne: Tuesday, March 15th at 7:00 p.m. – Shelburne Town Offices, 5420 Shelburne Road, ShelburneHinesburg: Tuesday, March 22nd at 7:00 p.m. – Hinesburg Town Offices, 10632 VT Route 116, HinesburgVergennes: Monday, March 28th at 7:00 p.m. – Bixby Library, 258 Main Street, VergennesStarksboro: Wednesday, March 30th at 7:00 p.m. – Robinson Elementary School, 41 Parsonage Road Starksborolast_img read more

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Snow Squalls Hit Long Island Amid Bone-chilling Temperatures

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Long Island got its first real taste of snow this season as squalls moved across the region Thursday morning amid bone-chilling temperatures.The National Weather Service’s Upton office warned of near-zero visibility from snow squalls, potentially creating whiteout conditions in some areas. Accumulation is expected to be minor, but poor vision and icy roads were the agency’s top concern.The sudden burst of snow comes as the Island is enveloped by an arctic air mass that has slowly moved across the middle of the country and finally arrived in our area Wednesday night. The frigid air is expected to hang around until Friday, forecasters said. Numerous vehicle crashes were reported across LI as a result of the snow.Temperatures are expected to be in the 20s Thursday with wind chills in the single digits by the evening.The weather service has issued a wind advisory until 6 p.m. Thursday and a high wind warning until Friday morning as gusts are predicted to top off at 60 mph. The force of the winds could topple trees and power lines and cause widespread power outages, the weather service warned.Wind gusts are supposed to die down considerably on Friday, but frigid temperatures will remain. Forecasters are calling for the mercury to sit around the high 20s throughout the day before falling to the low 20s in the evening. There’s also a possibility that the Island will receive 1 to 2 inches of snow, the weather service said.Long Island will get a break from the brutal cold this weekend with temperatures rising to the 40s and 50s, but rain is in the forecast.Long Islanders will be more familiar with this arctic blasts more culturally-accepted moniker: the polar vortex. The air mass is always present but occasionally dislodges and heads south, as is the case now, unfortunately.last_img read more

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BI to dominate ownership of ‘pandemic bonds’ as debt burden grows

first_imgThe government will issue nearly Rp 450 trillion (US$27.21 billion) worth of the so-called pandemic bonds to finance the country’s efforts to combat the health crisis and economic turmoil caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a Finance Ministry document.Apart from the pandemic bonds, the government is also planning to increase its bond sales target by Rp 160.2 trillion to Rp 549.6 trillion to address the widening budget deficit, which could reach 5.07 percent of gross domestic product (GDP).[RA::Indonesia to issue Rp 450 trillion in ‘pandemic bonds’ to finance COVID-19 fight::https://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2020/04/06/indonesia-to-issue-rp-450-trillion-in-pandemic-bonds-to-finance-covid-19-fight.html]Indonesia raised $4.3 billion from global bonds on Monday, including the longest-dated US dollar bond ever issued by an Asian nation, Reuters reported. The deal was finalized in the US and sold in maturities of 10.5 years and 30.5 years, worth $1.65 billion each, with a 50-year tranche worth $1 billion. It was Indonesia’s largest-ever bond. Bank Indonesia (BI) will dominate ownership of the nation’s “pandemic bonds” as the government seeks to safeguard the economy from COVID-19 at the risk of a rising debt burden, including from its longest ever 50-year bond tenure, economists say.Bank Permata chief economist Josua Pardede said that foreign investors would be reluctant to buy risky assets including Indonesia’s sovereign debt papers amid the current market routs.“The financing of pandemic bonds may be dominated by the central bank as foreign investors tend to avoid risky assets,” Josua told The Jakarta Post during a phone interview. “We expect that this will speed up the recovery of economic sectors affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.” “The debt burden will rise, but it will not surpass the legal debt-to-GDP ceiling ratio of 60 percent,” Center of Reform on Economics (Core) Indonesia research director Piter Abdullah told the The Jakarta Post.The government’s decision to issue a 50-year global bond will create unnecessary risks as the government must pay a high interest rate for a long period of time, he added.“A 50-year global bond is meant to provide buyers with incentives as their investment appetite has significantly declined amid the global uncertainties caused by the virus,” Piter said, adding that he opposed the government’s decision to issue such a bond because of payment difficulties.“This increases the risk for the government to pay debts with higher interest rates as it has a better option to issue debt papers in rupiah that can be bought by the central bank using a quantitative easing scheme.”Under the new Government Regulation in Lieu of Law (Perppu) No. 1/2020 issued last week, Bank Indonesia (BI) is now permitted to buy government bonds at auction to anticipate if the market is unable to fulfil the government’s financing target. The regulation revokes a 1999 law on the central bank, which only allowed BI to buy government bonds in the secondary market.Read also: Indonesia announces Rp 405 trillion COVID-19 budget, anticipates 5% deficit in historic movePresident Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has announced Rp 405.1 trillion in extra state spending to finance Indonesia’s battle against the novel coronavirus, specifically for healthcare, social safety net and business recovery programs.“However, we expect the debt-to-GDP ratio to increase to around 34 to 35 percent this year, from last year’s figure of 29.8 percent,” Josua said. “Inflation may also rise as the central bank bought government debt papers, but it will still remain within BI’s target.”Anugrah Sekuritas Indonesia fixed income analyst Ramdhan Ario Maruto said that international rating agencies may downgrade Indonesia’s sovereign credit rating, following rating downgrades on Indonesian companies.Fitch and Moody’s did not immediately respond upon being asked for comment by the Post.Indonesia’s sovereign credit rating from the three top rating agencies currently stands at the lower-end of the investment grade, which allows a full range of institutions worldwide to invest in the country’s debt papers. Any downgrade would return the country’s rating to junk, which would result in only select investors being eligible to invest in the country’s financial assets.“As long as the government can maintain the country’s debt-to-GDP ratio at a safe level, I think the rating agencies would at least affirm our ratings even during times of hardship like today,” said Ramdhan.Topics :last_img read more

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AP II limits flights, sets up new system to avoid congestion

first_imgState airport operator Angkasa Pura (AP) II is applying new policies at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Tangerang, Banten, after images of passengers crowding the airport went viral.The policies include dividing passenger lines into four sections, separating the document verification and health check process, as well as limiting flights to only seven per hour.AP II is set to enforce the new rules, aimed at supporting physical distancing measures to contain the spread of COVID-19, in the airport’s Terminal 2 and Terminal 3 starting on Friday. Topics : The passengers were lining up to get all their flight documents checked as additional requirements, such as a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests, rapid test results or health documents from a hospital or clinic, as well as a return ticket, are needed to fly during the COVID-19 mitigation period.“With the new system, this morning’s passenger flow was seamless for the domestic departure process at Terminal 2,” Awaluddin said, adding that a similar procedure was also being applied at Terminal 3, with some adjustments.Meanwhile, the airport will also limit hourly flights to up to seven flights to avoid passenger crowding. On Friday, Soekarno-Hatta International Airport will only serve a total of 54 departures and 56 arrivals.The country’s airport served up to 1,200 flights daily on normal days before the pandemic.The airport’s stakeholders have also agreed to cap the aircraft capacity for each flight to 50 percent to further ease the departure process while supporting physical distancing efforts, the operator stated.center_img “We have carried out an evaluation and subsequently implemented the new policy. Today, on May 15, the departure process for domestic routes is going well at Soekarno-Hatta, both in Terminal 2 and 3,” said AP II president director Muhammad Awaluddin in a statement released on Friday. The new system is expected to prevent the congestion of passengers at the airport. The first section of the passenger line will be designated for document verification, while the second section is for passengers filling in forms such as the Health Alert Card (HAC).Meanwhile, airport health office personnel will assess the passengers’ health in the third section of the line, while the last post is for passengers passing the inspection to proceed to check-in counters.Images of crowding passengers in the country’s biggest airport circulated on Thursday, apparently caused by an influx of passengers coming for morning flights. Thirteen departures were scheduled between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m., according to AP II communications manager Febri Toga Simatupang.last_img read more

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Free Scam Workshop At Sherman House Tuesday

first_imgBATESVILLE, Ind. — Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller’s Office invites local residents to attend a free fraud prevention workshop on Tuesday.A presentation will be given on the latest scams and how consumers can protect themselves from becoming a victim of fraud or identity theft.There is no charge to attend. Members of the public can register to attend by calling the Ripley County Extension Office at 812-689-6511.The workshop will be held at 6:45 p.m. at the Sherman House in Batesville. The event is sponsored by the Ripley County Extension Homemakers.Michelle Mayer, director of outreach services with the Attorney General’s Office, will share information on the importance of protecting personal and financial information, and how to check your credit report and place a freeze on your credit.For those unable to attend, information on the latest scams and consumer complaint forms are available at www.IndianaConsumer.com.last_img read more

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NASCAR Throw Back

first_imgHow many of you were watching NASCAR Throw Back from Darlington Speedway a week or so ago?  Did you see “Mean Joe Greene” of the Pittsburgh Steelers in his famous Coke commercial?  Believe it or not, that commercial gained famed at Super Bowl XIV in 1979.Joe Greene is now 69 years old and is a special assistant of player personnel for the Pittsburgh Steelers.  He has been married for 47 years.  His cohort in the commercial was a 12-year old boy by the name of Tommy Okon.  Okon is now 47 years old and has remained in the acting business.  He also has worked in filmography.This commercial had to be one of the top remembered ones of all time.last_img

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Zidane dismisses ‘special one’ label after latest Real Madrid triumph

first_img Loading… Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth10 Stargazing Locations To ‘Connect With Nature’6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually TrueA Soviet Shot Put Thrower’s Record Hasn’t Been Beaten To This DayWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Birds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The WorldYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeBest Car Manufacturers In The World”Chronicles Of Narnia” Fans Were Bemused To See How She Looks Now “I think every title we get is merit of the team, the players who are involved in that time,” he said. “It doesn’t have to demerit them, especially this one, as it has been very complicated and tough. We have fought until the end. “It is time to enjoy the achievement, but for football and for everyone, we have a game [against Leganes].” Zidane has refused to confirm whether he’ll be managing Madrid next season, admitting the future is never certain in football. “Nobody knows what’s going to happen in the future. I never talk about next season or the following year. I’ve got a contract and I’m happy. You never know what will happen in the future,” he said. read also:Zidane hopes Benzema can finish LaLiga top scorer “Things can change overnight in the world of football and I have no idea what the future holds. “We want to keep pushing and testing ourselves until the very end of the season. There will be a few days’ rest after the game against Leganes, but the season continues. We will be back training and preparing for City after the game against Leganes.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Zinedine Zidane insisted he was not “special”, saying he was simply lucky to be in charge of Real Madrid. Zidane has led Madrid to the La Liga title this season for his 11th trophy as coach of the Spanish giants. But the Frenchman dismissed any suggestions he felt like the “special one” – a title Jose Mourinho has previously used to describe himself. “No, no. I don’t feel that. I feel lucky to be here with these players every day,” Zidane told a news conference. “And being in this club, that’s why I feel lucky, and that’s why I enjoy that much every day. Because one day [it] will finish, as it happened already, but this time for real. “That’s why I am enjoying and focused on these kinds of things.” Madrid’s La Liga title was their first since 2016-17, when Cristiano Ronaldo led them to the crown. Ahead of their final game of the league season against Leganes on Sunday, Zidane paid tribute to his players for delivering the title.Advertisementlast_img read more

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