Moe. Welcomes Mike Gordon For Allman Brothers Band Cover At Red Rocks [Photo/Video/Full Audio]

first_imgmoe. | Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Morrison, CO | 6/1/2019 | Photos : Bill McAlaine Mike Gordon | Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Morrison, CO | 6/1/2019 | Photos : Bill McAlaine Load remaining images On Saturday, New York rockers moe. offered up an explosive two-set performance at Morrison, CO’s beloved Red Rocks Amphitheatre. White Denim handled the evening’s opening slot, followed by a set of music from Mike Gordon.Moe. opened up their first set with an exploratory take on “Timmy Tucker”, highlighted by Chuck Garvey and Al Schnier trading off a series of scorching guitar solos. With Jim Loughlin holding down a funky groove on the xylophone, the five-piece smoothly segued into “Tubing The River Styx”. Vinnie Amico and Rob Derhak locked into a tight rhythmic pocket before Garvey took the lead and set sail into blissful improvisational territory. Following “Tubing The River Styx”, moe. moved forward with “Dangerous Game” and “Jazz Cigarette”, a pair of newer tunes that the band debuted at Portland, ME’s State Theatre in February.Loughlin continued to dazzled the crowd with his xylophone playing before the band segued into the Derhak led “Water”.  To close out their impressive first set, moe. invited up Gordon to add a second bass on a cover of the Allman Brothers Band‘s “In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed”. Amico and Loughlin set the pace behind their kits before Garvey and Schnier locked into “Liz Reed’s” main guitar theme. Picking up the pace, Gordon and Derhak treated Red Rocks to a badass bass duel, as the rowdy crowd erupted with applause. Moe. did the ABB cover justice in a venue that the beloved band played many times over their illustrious career.Following a brief setbreak, moe. returned to open their second set with “The Road”. The band displayed some impressive vocal harmonies before Schnier got his chance to take a gritty guitar solo backed by Amico’s hard-hitting beats. “The Road” landed into “New Hope For The New Year”, with Garvey taking over the vocal lead. Following a series of peaking guitar solos, Schnier moved over to his keyboard set up and the band connected on “Bullet, with the attentive crowd singing along with the band. Loughlin was on fire all night long, hopping between his percussion kit and xylophone. The improv-heavy set continued with “Crushing”, which segued into the fan-favorite “George”. The band patiently worked through “George” before closing out their main frame with a massive take on “Rebubula”. Despite getting cut off due to a newly enforced strict curfew policy, moe. offered up a cover of The Vapors‘ “Turning Japanese” in the encore slot.Enjoy full-show audio and some videos below:moe. – Red Rocks Amphitheatre – 6/1/2019 [Full Audio][Audio: marcus]Mike Gordon – “Crazy Sometimes”[Video: spaceodyssee2000]Mike Gordon – “Whirlwind”[Video: spaceodyssee2000]moe. – “Rebubula”[Video: Dalton Michael Vaughan]Check out some beautiful photos from Saturday night’s show below courtesy of photographer Bill McAlaine.Next up for moe. is their own moe.down festival at Turin, NY’s Snow Ridge Ski Area on July 4th-6th. For ticketing information and a full list of moe.’s upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website.Setlist: moe. | Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Morrison, CO | 6/1/2019Set One: Timmy Tucker >(nh) Tubing The River Styx > The Pit > Dangerous Game, Jazz Cigarette > Water, In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed*Set Two: The Road > New Hope For The New Year > Bullet, Crushing > George > RebubulaEncore: Turning Japanese{* w/ Mike Gordon on bass} Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Healthy Eating

first_img“School food service directors and staff are taught to prepare lower-fat and -sugar foods in their training, but if kids do not eat them, they quit preparing them. If the child does not see foods that they like, they should bring food from home,” she said.Parents can advocate for healthy meals at schools.“I know the state department of education provides tested recipes that meet the dietary guidelines, and some schools are doing well about providing lower-fat, lower-sugar foods that are higher in fiber,” she said.The basic foods will not change over time for children, but the amount they consumer will, depending on their weight and physical activity. (Kids need to be active at least 60 minutes each day.)Healthy eating and exercise increases the metabolic rate and helps a child maintain a healthy weight throughout life, she said, a major step in avoiding many chronic diseases later in life.“Internal appetite control works best if the child controls his or her food intake even as a preschooler. It is the parent’s job to offer a variety of healthy foods, but the child’s job to control how much is consumed,” she said.(Brad Haire is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) The risk for chronic diseases begins in childhood, says a University of Georgia nutritionist. Healthy eating habits taught early can improve life later. “The habits that parents or other caregivers, including grandparents, establish in their children when they are young influence their lifelong food and activity choices,” says Connie Crawly, a nutrition expert with UGA Cooperative Extension.Chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, early heart disease and stroke can be prevented and controlled if the child and family eat meals low in fat, calories and sodium and high in fiber. It also means choosing the right fats to use in small amounts like olive oil and canola oil.Children over two-years-old should eat non-fat or low-fat dairy foods, many fruits and vegetables and little red meat. They should enjoy whole-grain breads, pastas and cereals, too, and not eat many fried foods, high-fat desserts or a lot of foods with added fat or sugar. The recipe for healthy eating can be easier said than done, though, she said.“If these healthy foods are offered routinely, kids will learn to like them. Most parents give up too easily when a child rejects a food. If they continue to offer it, the child will usually eat it — eventually,” Crawley said. When preparing school-time lunches for kids, parents should included good proteins like peanut butter, tuna, non-processed turkey or chicken or even beans or lentils. Pack whole-wheat breads. Homemade veggie soup, small salads and cut vegetables make good side dishes. Fruit or Fig Newtons make a good dessert choice, she said. And don’t forget non-fat milk.If making a child’s lunch everyday is too much, school cafeterias and food service staff prepare more healthy choices today than in the past. Parents should go over menu items with children to help them make good choices. last_img read more

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The Forest Service Is Protecting Pipelines Instead of Public Lands

first_img With multiple tree sitters in Jefferson National Forest blocking the path of pipeline construction crews, the United States Forest Service (USFS) has responded aggressively. They have denied food and water to tree-sitters, blocked support and medical attention from reaching them, and have essentially acted as a private security force for the corporations behind the Mountain Valley Pipeline.The Forest Service’s active support of the Mountain Valley Pipeline conflicts with the agency’s mission, infringes upon First Amendment rights, and defies overwhelming public opinion.When the tree-sitter known as Nutty went up in the monopod blockade that blocked a forest service road for 57 days, the Forest Service’s response was to cut off her access to food and water, set up 24-hour surveillance underneath her suspended platform, and attempt to bully the public into submission by arbitrarily arresting observers and shining spotlights on the support camp and monopod all night long. USFS subsequently enacted similar blockades around the tree-sits of Deckard and Fern.Yet the United States Forest Service is responsible for “managing public lands, helping people share and enjoy the forest, while conserving the environment for generations to come.” On their website, they claim that “some activities are compatible. Some are not.” The act of allowing an external non-government organization to exploit and destroy large areas of National Forest for their own private gain, and to actively aid in the construction of this pipeline, seems to goes against the very purpose of the agency. This 42” diameter fracked gas pipeline would be drilled under mountains and through unstable karst terrain, and would cross numerous fragile wetlands and streams. Its presence would not help “to sustain healthy, diverse, and productive forests and grasslands,” but instead would do the opposite.The Forest Service has the power to review projects and reject any use of public lands that would cause irreparable harm to forest function. Instead, they chose to make amendments to the region’s Forest Protection Plan in order to relax regulations that otherwise would have prevented this pipeline from moving forward. In early May, the 4th US Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments in Sierra Club (et al.) v. U.S. Forest Service. Chief Judge Roger Gregory noted that the Forest Service was initially highly skeptical of Mountain Valley’s assurances that its erosion and sediment control measures would be 79 percent effective. But as the approval process neared an end, the agency backed down. “I call that capitulation,” observed Gregory. In addition to acting against its own stated mission, USFS contravened the oath taken by all federal employees to “support and defend the Constitution of the United States” when the Forest Supervisor for Jefferson and Washington National Forests, Joby Timm, ordered a series of “emergency closure orders” under false pretenses.The Forest Service does have the authority to close certain areas of National Forests, however, their Federal Register states:“time, place, and manner restrictions are unconstitutional if they are ‘designed to suppress expression’ therefore, the Forest Service can apply these regulations as long as the purpose is not to overpower the constitutional rights of the public and press.”Joby Timm implies the real reason for the closure orders in his recent statement to Rolling Stone: “Current law and federal policy emphasize the important role of national forests in energy generation and transmission.” As Timm indicated when he revised USFS rules to accommodate MVP, his decisions are meant to support the call for expedited environmental review processes for “high priority infrastructure projects” in an executive order signed by President Trump last year.Timm’s statements, along with the timing of the five different closure orders in direct response to the appearance of aerial blockades, implies that the closures were put in place not for “public safety” but to suppress the protests and expedite the construction of the pipeline, which infringes upon First Amendment rights. A lawsuit brought against the USFS in early May by Virginia Senator Chap Petersen argues these same points.In clear defiance of public sentiment, the United States Forest Service has become a private security detail working for the Mountain Valley Pipeline. They have strayed far from their intended purpose and instead turned into a bureaucratic institution more interested in turning a profit than serving the people. It seems that pressure from exploitative and extractive industries have all but dismantled the true objective of the agency to “Care for the Land and Serve People.”A protester known as Fern, the latest person to erect an aerial blockade in Jefferson National Forest, said it best in a Facebook post to the public:“State agencies entrusted with public lands are in clear collusion with extractive enterprise, and this should be a rational expectation as long as there is the potential for cash flow between corporations with an interest in exploiting or abusing public lands and those who mediate or regulate access to them. EQT (by proxy) may be seen as “reimbursing” the Forest Service for costs incurred in the process of pipeline construction, but how is this different than a financial interest greasing the palm of any government agent to use its power to smooth the path to money making?” last_img read more

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Bogus faxes sent under Bar’s name

first_img Bogus faxes sent under Bar’s name Bogus faxes sent under Bar’s name June 15, 2004 Regular Newscenter_img Faxes have been sent to Florida lawyers on what appears to be Florida Bar letterhead, offering cut-rate prices on drugs such as Valium, Viagra, and Xanax, without the hassle of seeing a doctor or needing a prescription. Other faxes are invitations to pornography and gambling offers.Rest assured, these faxes were not sent by The Florida Bar as another membership service. And Bar General Counsel Paul Hill wants them to stop.In a memo to both the Attorney General’s Office and Bar counsel Barry Richard, Hill wrote: “We’d like our good name protected. And if there’s other relief, the Bar would like to explore it.”At this point, counsel is still reviewing what legal action may be taken.“Our information systems staff did some sleuthing and produced some reports which seem to trace the source of these transmissions to France and the Philippines,” Hill said.It appears that the culprits are pirating fax numbers off of the Bar’s public Web site and generating faxes electronically. Although fax numbers are not required, many members have included them as part of public information for convenience.The matter came to the Bar’s attention from Florida lawyers receiving the faxes and wondering what was going on.last_img read more

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Now in TFCU: Cybersecurity, TILA/RESPA compliance

first_imgThe print version of the November-December issue of The Federal Credit Union, NAFCU’s award-winning magazine, is on its way to members’ mailboxes, but the digital edition is online now.Highlights of the current issue include:“Leading by Example,” a look at how some credit union leaders are setting the tone for their staff and members;“The Credit Union Cybersecurity Challenge,” providing a look at the challenges facing credit unions and how to combat them;“Lending Compliance: Dodd-Frank and More,” focusing on how credit unions are dealing with the compliance challenges of the Truth in Lending Act/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act integrated disclosure rule; and“Compliance Central,” with a look at recent amendments to the Military Lending Act. continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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6 steps to build a world-class credit union

first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Building a framework for performance excellence—and ultimately a world-class credit union—involves taking six key steps, says Walter Jankowski, consultant/trainer at Reinvention LLC.Drivers of performance excellence, he says, “start with leadership, strategic planning, and a member focus.”Jankowski, speaking at CUNA Mutual Group’s recent Performance Excellence in Credit Unions Conference, cites these six steps for performance excellence:1. Clarify the strategySet your credit union’s direction with critical strategies and action plans, and check your progress along the way.last_img

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On Compliance: Merger transparency

first_img 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr This past June, the National Credit Union Administration issued a notice of proposed rulemaking that would expand and amplify credit union procedures related to merger initiatives. Specifically, NCUA’s objective is to enhance transparency—often thought of as “honesty” or “openness”—with members about merger-related transactions. And indeed, transparency and accountability are generally considered the two main pillars of good corporate governance.The agency explained in the notice that the current environment is “a period of significant consolidation.” This, in turn, has created situations in which “… some prospective merger partners may be seeking to influence the merging credit union’s financial incentives …” that implicate conflicts of interest in the merging credit union’s management. This explains NCUA’s concerned interest in transparency for members.During the comment period, many suggestions were submitted to NCUA. We don’t know what the final rule will look like, but we do know critical elements that NCUA will address—elements that boards of directors and management will want to be mindful of in the future should they be involved in a merger. The proposed merger rule touches, among others, five significant areas: definitional changes that accommodate the proposed rule’s modifications; an obligation for greater credit union information submissions to NCUA; revised information standards for members; a right of members to communicate their views with other members; and delineation of the timing of merger process notices. continue reading »last_img read more

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RHOBH’s Erika Jayne, Tom Girardi’s Divorce: Everything We Know

first_img“People are always like, ‘Oh, you guys don’t see each other a lot.’ But when we do see each other, it’s 100 percent, full-on attention,” the former Chicago star said in the February 2017 episode. “This is what people don’t understand. It’s not a detriment to the relationship. It’s actually helpful. It’s better than someone being in your face all the time and you’re not even present.”Scroll down for everything we know so far about the Girardis’ divorce. Six months into their relationship, Erika and the lawyer got engaged. They married in January 1999.“For the first 10 years of our marriage, I was by Tom’s side,” the “XXPEN$IVE” singer said in a February 2017 episode of RHOBH. “I was even the first lady of a couple legal organizations. Imagine that!”Due to Tom’s high-power job, he has only made a few appearances on the reality series since Erika joined the cast in 2015. It is likely that their divorce will play out during season 11, which began filming in early October 2020.- Advertisement – Pat the … divorce papers. After Erika Jayne went to court to end her marriage to Tom Girardi, Bravo fans were shocked to learn that what seemed like one of the strongest couples in Real Housewives history was not so picture-perfect after all.The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star announced in November 2020 that she and the powerhouse attorney had called it quits after 21 years of marriage. A source later told Us Weekly exclusively, “Erika and Tom had an unconventional marriage, spending a lot of time apart.”- Advertisement – Erika, who shares adult son Tommy with ex-husband Thomas Zizzo, met Tom in the late 1990s while waitressing at one of his favorite West Hollywood hot spots, Chasen’s. One year later, she decided to give him her phone number, and he subsequently reached out to her through his secretary.“I told her, ’Tell Mr. Girardi if he wants to take me out on a date, he needs to call me himself and ask me and give me enough time to prepare,’” the Bravo personality recalled in her 2018 memoir, Pretty Mess. “You know how men are, especially if they are successful. They expect you to drop everything right away. That’s not how I work, I don’t care who you are.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Local knowledge

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Higher regulated airfares could help airlines survive pandemic: INACA

first_imgDomestic airlines welcome the government’s plan to increase both ceiling and floor airfares since the policy could reduce airlines’ burden amid the pandemic that has left travel-related industries devastated, an industry group says.The Indonesia National Air Carrier Association (INACA) said higher ceiling prices could help airlines cope with a new regulation that caps passenger capacity at 50 percent per flight in support of the universal public health advice of physical distancing. The rule was stipulated in Transportation Ministerial Regulation No. 18/2020.“It is inevitable that with the decreasing seating capacity, the seat load factor [on airplanes] will be decreased too, and it will increase the cost per seat per aircraft,” said Denon on April 16. “To reduce our burden, the INACA positively responds to the Transportation Ministry plan to increase the ceiling and floor prices of airline tickets.” Civil aviation director general Novie Riyanto said the ministry was currently finalizing the ceiling and floor prices for airfares, which would consider stipulations in the new ministerial regulation on transportation controls to slow the spread of COVID-19.“The new ceiling and floor prices, however, will be temporarily imposed during the large-scale social restrictions (PSBB),” said Novie as quoted by Kontan on April 16.“The increase in ceiling and floor prices is implemented as a compensation for the airlines who have to bear losses because they are only allowed to fill a maximum of 50 percent of their total seat capacity for passengers.”The air travel industry is one of the hardest-hit sectors by COVID-19, which has led to a sharp drop in air travel demand globally. Finance Ministry data as of April 17 estimated that the national airlines’ revenue loss had reached Rp 207 billion as a result of the pandemic.Topics :last_img read more

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