Sleater-Kinney Teases New Album Produced By St. Vincent

first_imgWhile Brownstein previously mentioned the forthcoming project in early 2018 in an interview with Billboard focused on Portlandia, she warned that it would not be coming any time soon. “Now, just so you know, we’re going to do this very slowly,” she said. “It’s an ongoing conversation.”Now, it appears that conversation includes St. Vincent as a producer, and it’s expected to see the light of day this year. In a new post on social media, Washington-native indie rock trio Sleater-Kinney announced that they have some new music on the way produced by Annie Clark—better known by her stage name, St. Vincent. The post, shared on both Sleater-Kinney and St. Vincent’s pages, is light on details, simply stating “Sleater-Kinney. Produced by St. Vincent. 2019.”The new project would mark Sleater-Kinney’s first studio album since their 2015 comeback LP, No Cities to Love. The trio, comprised of Corin Tucker, Janet Weiss, and Carrie Brownstein, reformed in 2014 following a nearly decade-long hiatus, during which Brownstein earned a new name for herself in the comedy world for her work on Portlandia with Fred Armisen.As Pitchfork notes, early last year, St. Vincent shared a clip of herself warming up for a show with a rendition of Sleater-Kinney’s “Modern Girl”. The year prior, in 2017, St. Vincent collaborated with Brownstein on a series of Instagram short films.last_img read more

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Prolonged sitting, TV viewing appear to shorten life

first_imgSitting for more than three hours a day may shorten your life by two years, even if you are physically active and don’t smoke, according to a new study by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Pennington Biomedical Research Center (PBRC) in Baton Rouge, La. Watching TV for more than two hours a day may also reduce life expectancy by another 1.4 years, they found.The study, published July 10, 2012 in the online journal BMJ Open, is one of a growing number of recent studies pointing to the health hazards of a sedentary lifestyle. Several previous studies have linked extended periods spent sitting down and/or watching TV to conditions such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.I-Min Lee, professor of epidemiology at HSPH, and Peter T. Katzmarzyk of PBRC analyzed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to calculate the amount of time U.S. adults spent watching TV and sitting. They reviewed the research database MEDLINE for published studies on sitting time and deaths from all causes, pooled the data from the five relevant studies involving almost 167,000 adults, and reanalyzed it, taking account of age and sex. They combined this data and the NHANES figures to come up with an estimate of the theoretical effects of a risk factor at a population. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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PBJ: The Perfect Trail Food

first_imgThe object of my desire.I drove up to the Blue Ridge Parkway the other day and attempted a hike to St. Marys Falls in the St. Marys Wilderness. I say attempted because I was turned away at the trailhead and told the trail was closed due to wildfires. As I stared blankly at the man delivering this news, sniffing the air for any hint of smoke – and finding none – I became frustrated that my plan was being stymied by a wildfire I barely believed existed. Sometimes when stuff like this happens to me, I will fly into a rage and curse everyone, maybe throw a head fake or scream, “Look over there!” and sprint down the trail anyway. (I have a slight problem with authority, especially when I think authority is being an idiot.)This did not happen. I was able to keep my composure because I had a secret weapon: the PBJ.While its exact origins are subject to myths, legends, and fables involving 1900s entrepreneurs, WWII soldiers and Smuckers, the Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich has been a staple of American Cuisine since the turn of the century and the bane of elementary school kids since the first mom threw a PBJ in a paper bag. Something about the combination of peanut butter, jelly, and bread, resonates with Americans. Why? Who knows, this is America and that’s what we like, and that’s that.My own personal history with the PBJ has had its ups and downs. When I was a kid, long before Taco Bell had the idea, my buddies and I supplemented the usual ingredients with Nacho Cheese Doritos, adding a satisfying crunch to the mix. When I was in high school, I ate two every night before bed in an misguided effort to bulk up for lacrosse season. This is one of the all-time backfires; a mistake my body and mind are still trying to recover from a decade later. In college, we used the George Forman Grill on our PBJ, and everything else for that matter.Over the years I have found the PBJ to be just about the perfect trail food. Trail mix GORP advocates may scoff at the idea, but I stand my ground. It’s easy to make, filling, and delicious, but the best part is that the more beat up it gets in your pack, the better it tastes. That’s why I like to pack mine in a sandwich bag or foil. I love digging a PBJ out of my pack and finding it squashed and mangled, its jelly filling having soaked through the bread in a fruit preserve osmosis scientists are still trying to figure out. If you are skiing and pull a forgotten half frozen one out of your pack, it’s like finding an oasis in the desert.Scenic OverlookMy PBJ lead me here.But back to the story. So, having been rebuked from my original plan – and deciding not to fight everyone – my number one priority shifted from “Get to the spot to take some photos and check it out for a story because it’s my job,” to, “Find a nice, quiet place to sit and eat this PBJ I packed for lunch.” So I backtracked a few miles and pulled into the next turnoff that had hiking access, took a quick look at the map, and set off down the trail. I didn’t particularly know where I was going or what I would find, I just knew that I had a PBJ and a peach in my pack and if I didn’t find a place to eat it, I might as well go ahead and wander into that theoretical wildfire.The thought of that PBJ saved my trip as far as I’m concerned; if I had packed a ham and cheese, things could have turned out way different – something I don’t really want to think about. I had a pleasant hike, ate my lunch at the bottom of a waterfall and broke a significant sweat, so all in all it was a success.The moral of the story: When life gives you lemons, make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Here’s how:Ingredients: Two (2) slices wheat bread, crunchy peanut butter, strawberry jelly. Crunchy is essential and don’t even try to put %*#@&#@ing grape jelly on there. Get out of here with your grape jelly. Blackberry is as far as I’ll go.Step 1: Spread a slice of bread with a generous amount of jelly (always do the jelly first or your mom will yell at you for ruining the jar by getting peanut butter in there. Apparently, contaminating peanut butter with bits of jelly is cool). Then do the same with the peanut butter on the other slice of bread.Step 2: Place the covered bread slices together with their respective toppings facing each other. THIS IS THE KEY ELEMENT! If you perform this step wrong, you will have to start again…you will also make a mess and get yelled at by your mom again.last_img read more

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Endangered Species Act: Success or Failure?

first_imgThe Center for Biological Diversity found that the Endangered Species Act (ESA) had a very successful recovery rate, with some 90 percent of species recovering at the rate specified by their recovery plans. The recovery of theYellowstone Grizzly Bear is considered to be an ESA success story. Photo Cred: U.S. Fish & Wildlife ServiceEarthTalk®E – The Environmental MagazineDear EarthTalk: Do environmentalists think the Endangered Species Act has been a success or failure with regard to protecting biodiversity in the U.S.?                        — Ron McKnight, Trenton, NJWhile that very question has been a subject of debate already for decades, most environmental advocates are thankful such legislation is in place and proud of their government for upholding such high standards when it comes to preserving rare species of plants and animals.That said, critics of the legislation make some solid points. For starters, only one percent of species (20 out of 2,000) under the protection of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) have recovered sufficiently to qualify for delisting. And the millions of dollars spent on often failed recovery efforts are difficult to justify, especially in these otherwise tough economic times.But even though the vast majority of species protected under the ESA have not recovered doesn’t undermine the significance of those species—bald eagles, gray wolves, and grizzly bear to name a few—that have rebounded thanks to forward thinking legislation and wildlife management. Louisa Wilcox of the Natural Resources Defense Council is grateful to the ESA for the continued existence of grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park. “After listing, the government cleaned up the massive garbage problems in Yellowstone Park, which reduced the habituation of bears to human foods—a pattern that often leads to grizzly deaths,” she reports. Commercial sheep herds were moved out of core grizzly habitat while hundreds of miles of roads on public lands in the region were closed to improve the iconic bears’ chances for survival. The result: The Yellowstone grizzly population more than doubled while human/bear interactions and incursions by hungry grizzlies onto local ranches have declined. “So, by any reckoning, the Yellowstone grizzly bear story is an ESA success,” concludes Wilcox.To test whether or not the ESA has been effective on a grander scale, the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD), another leading green group, compared for its 2012 “On Time, On Target” report the actual recovery rate of 110 listed species with the projected recovery rate in their federal recovery plans. The 110 species occupy all 50 U.S. states, include all major taxonomic groups, and have various listing lengths.CBD found that the ESA had “a remarkably successful recovery rate: 90 percent of species are recovering at the rate specified by their federal recovery plan,” adding: “On average, species recovered in 25 years, while their recovery plan predicted 23 years—a 91 percent timeliness accomplishment.”CBD also confirmed the hypothesis that the majority of listed species have not enjoyed protection for long enough to warrant an expectation of recovery yet. “80 percent of species have not yet reached their expected recovery year,” reports CBD, adding that on average species have been listed for just 32 years, while their recovery plans required 46 years for success. This recent study’s findings echo the results of an earlier (2006) analysis in the Northeastern U.S. that found some 93 percent of federally listed species there were stabilized or improving since getting ESA protection and 82 percent were on track to meet recovery goals. “When judged in the light of meeting recovery plan timelines for recovery, the Endangered Species Act is remarkably successful,” says CBD. “Few laws of any kind can boast a 90 percent success rate.”CONTACTS: CBD, www.biologicaldiversity.org; “On Time, On Target” Report, www.esasuccess.org. EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E – The Environmental Magazine ( www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.last_img read more

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Operation UNIFIED RESOLVE seizes US$20 million worth of cocaine

first_img SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic – The U.S. Coast Guard seized US$20 million worth of cocaine off a vessel southwest of the Dominican Republic, adding another bust to a successful string in the Caribbean Sea by U.S. and international agencies recently. The April 21 seizure of 602 kilograms of cocaine occurred after a U.S. Coast Guard aircrew spotted a go-fast vessel traveling toward the Dominican coast carrying suspicious cargo. In response, an armed helicopter and boat crew were launched from the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Spencer to intercept the vessel. When they arrived, agents discovered 25 packages on board, all of which later tested positive as cocaine. The bust was part of Operation UNIFIED RESOLVE, a counter-narcotics and migrant interdiction operation in the Caribbean region. It complements Operation CARIBBEAN GUARD, a coordinated effort between the U.S. Coast Guard, Department of Homeland Security, and other commonwealth and territorial law enforcement agencies to combat illicit maritime trafficking to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. Operation UNIFIED RESOLVE also is a part of Operation MARTILLO, a multinational effort to disrupt transnational criminal organizations by limiting their ability to use Central America as a transit zone. The Coast Guard valued the shipment, which was offloaded on May 10 in Miami Beach in the U.S. state of Florida, at US$20 million. Two alleged narco-traffickers were arrested and turned over to officials in Miami, but their names were not released. “This seizure highlights the hard work and dedication of our crews in stopping the illegal flow of drugs in the Caribbean and reducing the destabilizing effects that drugs have on society,” Cmdr. Anthony Williams, commanding officer of the Spencer, said in a prepared statement. The April seizure was followed by an early May bust of 1,280 kilograms of cocaine, valued at US$37 million, by U.S. authorities in the Caribbean south of Puerto Rico, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. Two Dominican citizens, Santos Lantigua-Núñez and Efraín Cedano-Díaz, were arrested and charged with conspiracy to possess a controlled substance on board a vessel subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, the Justice Department said. The defendants are facing 10 years to life in prison if convicted. “Our message continues to be the same: we will detect and interdict drug smugglers attempting to flood our island with their poisonous cargo,” said Vito Salvatore Guarino, special agent in Charge of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Caribbean Division. U.S. agencies have teamed with international partners in the Caribbean to seize several large cocaine shipments in the past year amid an increase in drug smuggling from South America through the region as an alternative to the Central America-Mexico route. During the 2013 calendar year, the Coast Guard Seventh District, which has bases in the southeastern U.S. and in the Caribbean, seized $1.8 billion worth of cocaine and US$22 million worth of marijuana, officials said. The increase in illicit shipments through the Caribbean has put added pressure on governments in the region, which is being used as a transshipment point. Officials in the Dominican Republic, the largest stopover point for cocaine in the Caribbean, said they have captured record amounts of cocaine in each of the past three years, including nearly 10 metric tons last year. On May 12, officials from the Dominican Republic’s National Drug Control Office (DNCD) said they had seized 330 kilograms of cocaine from the port in Haina on the outskirts of the capital, Santo Domingo. The shipment, which had been sent from Barranquilla, Colombia, was found in eight nylon sacks inside a shipping container, officials said. Working off intelligence they had gathered, DNCD officials said they inspected 70 containers before finding the shipment. With Dominican territory being used as a major transshipment point for smuggling drugs to Europe, British Ambassador to the Dominican Republic Steven Fisher recently lauded the work of the DNCD against drug smuggling. “Recently, we have had successful and constant seizures of drugs that were directed to London and other European nations due to close collaboration and sharing of intelligence between the DNCD and our British police. So, we are pleased with their work,” he said in a prepared statement. By Dialogo May 20, 2014last_img read more

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Binghamton adds stops signs to Grand Boulevard at Crestmont Road intersection

first_imgMayor Rich David’s office says the newly added stop signs improve the safety of the intersection along with the crosswalks and parking lines for parking on the street. The city of Binghamton added stop signs to Grand Boulevard at the intersection of Crestmont Road Wednesday. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The intersection of Grand Boulevard and Crestmont Road is now an all-way stop. “We’ll continue to work with residents, the Binghamton Metropolitan Transportation Study and West Side Councilwoman Sophia Resciniti on long-term safety improvements on Grand Boulevard,” said Mayor David in an official press release sent to 12 News. The mayor’s office says 16 car accidents happened at the intersection in a five-year period. They say over 5,600 vehicles pass through the intersection a day.last_img read more

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Coronavirus spreading now in Korea has its origin in Europe, US

first_imgThe novel coronavirus spreading in South Korea now has its origin in Europe and the US, health authorities said Monday. The variant belongs to the GH clade, which is usually found in Europe and the US, according to an analysis on genome samples. This implies the virus could have been imported into Korea by those who entered Korea from those regions in March and April. “As we interpret it, the virus belonging to the GH clade is circulating recently because we had many arrivals from Europe and the US in March and April, and the virus imported then is now driving community transmissions,” said Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Jeong Eun-kyung, at a briefing. The variants found in the genome samples in February and March, when the country saw hundreds of cases linked to a church in Daegu and hospital in North Gyeongsang Province at the peak of the COVID-19 outbreak here, belonged to the S clade and V clade. The virus in the S and V clades were circulated largely in China, where the coronavirus is believed to have originated from, and other parts of Asia. Touching on recent study results on the possibility of airborne spread of the COVID-19, Jeong said that the measures to prevent the spread of the virus stays the same, calling on the public to stick to the basic rules such as avoiding enclosed, populated environments, wearing masks and washing hands. This came after 239 scientists from 32 countries called on governments to acknowledge the aerosol transmission of the COVID-19 and take control measures in an open letter to be published this week. On Monday, Korea reported 48 more COVID-19 cases as the country continues to see small-scale outbreaks, infections coming from overseas as well as an increasing number of cases with unidentified routes of transmission.Half of the new cases, 24, were locally transmitted and the other half were imported. Of the locally transmitted cases, seven were registered in Gwangju in connection with a previously identified Buddhist temple cluster. Five cases were reported in Gyeonggi Province, five in Incheon, two each in South Jeolla Province, Daejeon and Seoul, according to the KCDC. Seven more people tested positive for the coronavirus in connection with the temple in Gwangju, bringing the number of related total infections to 87, according to the KCDC. A surge in cases in South Jeolla Province, which surrounds Gwangju, led the provincial government to tighten social distancing measures. Under the “social distancing level 2,” gatherings of 50 or more people indoors or 100 or more people outdoors are banned, and wearing masks is mandatory when using public transportation. Of the total cases reported in the past week, infection routes for 10.7 percent of the cases remain unidentified, Jeong said, adding “quiet transmission” among those in their 50s or over is taking place in the community. Korea reported 24 additional imported cases, 21 of them were from Asia and three from the Americas. Some 15 people detected at the airport quarantine screening and the rest while under quarantine after they entered the country from abroad.Out of the country’s total 13,137 cases, 11,848 people, or about 90.2 percent, were released from quarantine after making full recoveries. Some 1,005 people are under quarantine. One more patient died, bringing the death toll to 284. The overall fatality rate stands at 2.16 percent. The country has carried out 1,297,367 tests since Jan. 3, with 21,292 people being tested as of Monday.  Topics :last_img read more

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David Luiz confident Unai Emery will improve Arsenal’s leaky defence

first_imgDavid Luiz confident Unai Emery will improve Arsenal’s leaky defence Arsenal have conceded as many goals as West Ham and Wolves this season (Picture: Getty)But Luiz has defended his manager’s tactics and believes there has been an improvement recently, collecting a clean sheet in their last outing before the international break against Bournemouth.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘We talk about this with every single club, Arsenal is no different,’ Luiz told Sky Sports when asked about the criticism of the side’s defending.‘I think Unai is working very well with the plan to defend and then the plan to attack.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘I always say, defending starts with the strikers and through the whole team, and you can see with modern football that the goalkeeper is now like a No 6.‘We are going to try and improve, we are already doing well and the last few games have showed that we are stronger in a defensive way. Advertisement The Gunners have conceded almost twice as many goals as league leaders Liverpool (Picture: Getty)David Luiz insists Unai Emery is working on improving Arsenal’s defensive displays and is confident there will be a marked improvement at the back in the coming games.Although the Gunners are third in the Premier League table, they have only kept two clean sheets and conceded 11 goals in their eight games.They rank joint eighth defensively, letting in almost twice as many goals as league leaders Liverpool, and both the defence and Emery have been criticised for some meek performances at the back. Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 19 Oct 2019 8:00 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link5.6kSharescenter_img Arsenal are next in action away to Sheffield United on Monday night (Picture: Getty)‘I want this club to improve in every part of the game. I think we’ve started really well and we just lost one game in the Premier League.‘I think the team is improving and now we are in third in the table but we want to finish this season fighting for the title.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Comment Advertisementlast_img read more

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Governor Wolf Announces New PHARE Funding to Support Affordable Housing across Pennsylvania

first_imgGovernor Wolf Announces New PHARE Funding to Support Affordable Housing across Pennsylvania Infrastructure,  Press Release,  Results Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced recipients of a new round of funding for housing programs made available through the Pennsylvania Housing Affordability and Rehabilitation Enhancement (PHARE) fund. This funding is a portion of the Realty Transfer Tax earmarked through Act 58 of 2015 to support affordable housing statewide. The funding collected during the past fiscal year totals $12.03 million.PHFA staff working on the PHARE program received and evaluated 140 proposals requesting support for housing initiatives in 49 counties. Governor Wolf today announced that 68 housing programs in 38 counties would receive allocations from this portion of PHARE funding.“When we fund affordable housing, we not only help families with this basic need, but we also promote economic development through the construction work that’s stimulated,” said Governor Wolf. “The demand for affordable housing continues to outpace the housing stock that’s available, so the funding made available today will help address this critical unmet need.”Since 2012, the PHARE program has received a portion of the impact fees collected from natural gas companies operating in the state with the goal of addressing the housing shortage caused by the impact of this new industry. These funds, however, can only be used to assist projects in counties that have working natural gas wells. The new RTT-based funding can be used to support projects in any of the state’s 67 counties.Today’s PHARE funding is expected to produce the following results:3,052 individuals or families will receive rental or utility assistance408 homes will be rehabilitated or repaired756 new rental units will be created40 new single-family homes will be constructedSites will be acquired or prepared for the future construction of 52 homes20 households will received home purchase assistance“I want to thank Governor Wolf and the state legislature for the passage and signing of Act 58, which has made all this possible,” said PHFA Executive Director and CEO Brian A. Hudson Sr. “This funding will be used to leverage another $214.7 million in public and private monies, creating a much larger impact well beyond today’s initial investment of PHARE/RTT dollars. Many families and communities will be helped by this additional funding.”PHFA staff report that $9.4 million of the $12.03 allocated today will be used to fund housing projects benefiting households with income 50 percent below the area median income (AMI). This represents 78.1 percent of the awarded funding.A list of the proposals receiving PHARE/RTT funding is available at: www.phfa.org/legislation/act105.aspx. Look under the subhead for the Realty Transfer Tax Fund.Editor’s Note: The PHARE fund is also often referred to as the state’s Housing Trust Fund.About PHFAThe Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency works to provide affordable homeownership and rental housing options for older adults, low- and moderate-income families, and people with special housing needs. Through its carefully managed mortgage programs and investments in multifamily housing developments, PHFA also promotes economic development across the state. Since its creation by the legislature in 1972, it has generated more than $13.1 billion of funding for nearly 167,400 single-family home mortgage loans, helped fund the construction of 132,531 rental units, and saved the homes of more than 48,800 families from foreclosure. PHFA programs and operations are funded primarily by the sale of securities and from fees paid by program users, not by public tax dollars. The agency is governed by a 14-member board. April 13, 2017center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Uncertainty persists over Ireland’s IORP II transposition

first_imgIreland is “at an advanced stage” of drafting legislation to implement IORP II, according to a government minister – but the pensions sector remains uncertain about the final timeline.Regina Doherty, Ireland’s minister for employment affairs and social protection, yesterday told a conference organised by the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) that her department was working towards transposing IORP II “as early as possible”.The deadline for member states to transpose the EU-wide pension fund directive was 13 January. The EU has launched infringement proceedings against several EU countries relating to transposition of IORP II – although in several cases the infringements are understood to be minor.Ireland’s pensions industry has been pushing the government to implement IORP II to put an end to the uncertainty facing schemes and employers, but the timeline for transposition remains a mystery. The IAPF held its annual defined contribution conference today, and Moriarty said the association would call for IORP II to be transposed as quickly as possible.   Regina Doherty, minister for employment affairs and social protection, IrelandIn her speech yesterday, Doherty also spoke about the government’s plans to introduce auto-enrolment. Findings from consultations and research would be delivered to the government “in the coming months and I look forward to the scheme commencing, as planned, in 2022”, she said.ESRI was commissioned by Doherty’s department to examine the potential macro- and micro-economic impacts of auto-enrolment.According to figures from Ireland’s Central Statistics Office and cited by Doherty, 35% of private sector workers were signed up to voluntary pension plans in 2018. This figure rose to 47% when public sector arrangements were included.“Despite considerable efforts over many years by the state and the private sector to incentivise voluntary pension participation, pension coverage has failed to increase in any way significantly,” she said.center_img This week the country’s pensions regulator, the Pensions Authority, published a report on defined benefit scheme statistics in which it said the IORP II Directive “will shortly be transposed into Irish law”.However, when questioned, a spokesperson for the Department for Employment Affairs and Social Protection said it was “aware that an application has been granted for a judicial review for a set of reliefs and a stay in relation to the transposition into Irish law of the IORP II Directive”.Judicial reviewThis was a reference to a move by the Association of Pension Trustees in Ireland (ATPI) and two other plaintiffs to try to block IORP II transposition due to fears about the impact on smaller schemes, in particular small self-directed schemes that are mostly for company directors. The government has indicated that a exemption for smaller schemes would no longer apply under the IORP II regime in Ireland.The case brought by APTI was due “for mention” in the High Court on 28 May, but this was adjourned until 4 June, again “for mention”, which is for more administrative matters than a hearing.“Everybody is in the dark a bit about what the timeline is for transposition,” said Jerry Moriarty, chief executive at the Irish Association of Pension Funds (IAPF).“It was clearly delayed even before there was a court case so I’m not sure whether that’s a side issue or a real issue for transposition,” he told IPE.last_img read more

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