A Military of Infancy: Does Liberia Really Have An Army?

first_imgFebruary 11, 2015Honoring Major General Suraj Alao AbdurrahmanHistory has taught us never to forget about our fallen heroes and heroines whose compassionate contribution to mankind is incredibly distinct. Whenever we fail to pay courtesy to deserving statesmen and outstanding global actors who are worthy of public admiration, we pierce our own consciences with sharp instruments of ingratitude and immodesty. We become no different from a vicious ingrate whose mentality is driven by pretense and pomposity. This is when we practically define who a coward is. In this frame of obscurity, our action proves worthless as a result of our madcap opinion and premature perception. Our minds only become revived and redeemed when we recollect our memories to salute great history-makers and pacesetters whose illuminating shadows and indelible imprints are inherent within every sphere of human existence.With this daring courage which subdues public ingratitude and guilt, I cannot widen my thoughts on this subject without reverently acknowledging a self-sacrificing character whose name shall remain a glowing image in Liberia’s post-conflict Military history. Certainly, his duty to service yesterday was without price and his legacy today is a conspicuous demonstration of his loyalty and commitment to a country he was never a citizen off. The recent death news of Major General Suraj Alao Abdurrahman came as a big shock to our nation. As all of us including his family and AFL personnel mourn is demise, I am pondering over this question “How could our post-war military hero bid us farewell so soon especially when we are about to honor gallant men and women of our armed forces on this unique day?”Nothing seems more important to me during this Armed Forces Day celebration other than remembering Major General Suraj Alao Abdurrahman who led our AFL from June 2007 to February 11, 2014.  I am quite aware his tenure was very challenging, but he did not one day contradict his ethics of professionalism. It was not an easy journey building a new defense force after 15 years of civil turmoil. His task to command a juvenile military was huge, but nothing could easily twist his resilience and twirl his tenacity. Surely, this extraordinary son of Africa specifically Nigeria will always remain an illustrious symbol of African Solidarity as our nation consolidates its resources to rebuild a strong system of defense. Fallen General Suraj was a continental champion without border. His determination to increase Liberia post-war military strength was unwavering. Join me now as I pulse with deep regret to extend my utmost sympathy to Nigeria for this irreplaceable loss.Looking at ‘Army’ from a realistic context It makes me upset when State actors begin to ignorantly brag about our current military status even though we have not reached the level of having a Brigade, Division, or Corp. They pretend to forget that Liberia is still far from having an Army. The current category of our military is between Battalion and Brigade. Our country is three steps away from achieving an army status. Before any nation can boast about having an army, it military composition must be 50,000 plus soldiers along with modern equipments/technology which is in compliance with universal standards of militarization. As a means of justifying my view, these are lucid definitions about different units or segments under a chain of any military arrangement or organizational structure.Squad – 9 to 10 soldiers. Typically commanded by a sergeant or staff sergeant, a squad or section is the smallest element in the Army structure, and its size is dependent on its function.Platoon – 16 to 44 soldiers. A platoon is led by a lieutenant with an NCO as second in command, and consists of two to four squads or sections.Company – 62 to 190 soldiers. Three to five platoons form a company, which is commanded by a captain with a first sergeant as the commander’s principle NCO assistant. An artillery unit of equivalent size is called a battery, and a comparable armored or air cavalry unit is called a troop.Battalion – 300 to 1,000 soldiers. Four to six companies make up a battalion, which is normally commanded by a lieutenant colonel with a command sergeant major as principle NCO assistant. A battalion is capable of independent operations of limited duration and scope. An armored or air cavalry unit of equivalent size is called a squadron.Brigade – 3,000 to 5,000 solders. A brigade headquarter commands the tactical operation of two to five organic or attached combat battalions. Normally commanded by a colonel with a command sergeant major as senior NCO, brigades are employed on independent or semi-independent operations. Armored cavalry, ranger and Special Forces units of this size are categorized as regiments or groups.Division – 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers. Usually consisting of three brigade-sized elements and commanded by a major general, divisions are numbered and assigned missions based on their structures. The division performs major tactical operations for the corps and can conduct sustained battles and engagements.Corps – 20,000 to 45,000 soldiers. Two to five divisions constitute a corps, which is typically commanded by a lieutenant general. As the deployable level of command required to synchronize and sustain combat operations, the corps provides the framework for multi-national operations.Army – 50,000 plus soldiers. Typically commanded by a lieutenant general or higher, an army combines two or more corps.  The commander in chief may order formation of a field army to direct operations of assigned corps and divisions.Considering these contemporary descriptions of various groups within any modern military hierarchy, anyone can easily agree with me that Liberia does not have an ARMY. Disappointingly, our country military sector lacks adequate funding, training, logistics/equipments, and technology. The strength of our Navy is very weak to an extent our country does not even have a gun-boat. Up-to-date, Liberia does not even have an Air Force. A military without an Air Force is incomplete.Even though our military is 107 years old, but it is the least defense force in West Africa in terms of quantity and quality. It is unthinkable to know that our new AFL does not even have a single helicopter or jumbo jet to carryout air operations. This tells anyone how feeble our defense system is. The need for a rigorous security sector reform is critical to national development and growth. Sometimes, I wonder how many of our soldiers are well-knowledgeable about map reading, military technology, intelligence, covert tactics, artillery strategy and other technical disciplines. I thought we should spend more time and resources in order to advance our new AFL, since its current numerical strength is infinitesimal (less than 2,500 men).From LFF to AFL The cornerstone of what is today known as the Armed Forces of Liberia was laid in 1908 when our territorial integrity was under frequent attacks as a result of porous borders and foreign encroachment of our land. The recruitment and inauguration of the first 500-strong men on February 06, 1908 into the Liberian Frontier Force was a milestone in our history. A sturdy caveat was sent to Great Britain and France to dislodge their territorial ambitions.After 48 years of existence, the Liberian Frontier Force (LFF) metamorphosized into the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) under the Amended National Defense Law of 1956.  The New National Defense Act of 2008 was approved on August 21, 2008. It repeals the National Defense Act of 1956, the Coast Guard Act of 1959, and the Liberian Navy Act of 1986. Our National Defense Force is far from achieving its full strength due to insufficient support.Spotlighting the New AFLThe security of Liberia seems not to be a priority to this regime simply because UNMIL soldiers are still present in huge quantity. The quantity of UNMIL military personnel surpasses our current AFL. This exposes our government’s weakness in defending its citizenry especially against external aggression and potential insecurity. The most recent population statistics of Liberia is more than 4 million. The total population of Liberia is 2,000 times higher than its military composition. This means one AFL soldier is under statutory mandate to provide security for 2,000 citizens at a time. The gap is too wide and this could lead to continuous military fatigue and failure.The challenge we have as a nation to build a qualitative and quantitative security sector is too huge and we must begin to mitigate them now in order to protect our democratic sovereignty and domestic civility, and liberty. It is time for our leaders to invest more in security, because societal stability depends on security. The United States of America is great today because of its military might. It is unarguably evident that insecurity leads to instability and anarchy. The office of President Sirleaf cannot be using over US$40 million in 12 months while AFL has an annual budget of US$12.9 million (0.74% of GDP). This is a serious contradict on the part of our Commander-In-Chief (President Sirleaf) even though she has made big public commitments to prioritize national security. AFL soldiers are among the least paid military personnel in Africa and the World.Liberians can only become proud of a vibrant ARMY tomorrow if State actors implement timely and unique policy measures to upgrade our current AFL. The load we have to carry as a nation is burdensome and it takes collectivism and commitment to regain our real rank in Africa. We cannot boast of being Africa’s first Independent Nation when we have the least military force. We cannot claim to have ushered countries like Guinea, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, South Africa, Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso, Gambia, Gabon, and Cape Verde into a self-governing status when we are crawling behind these countries in almost every aspect of development. This is an irony!The Bad Side of Liberia’s Post-conflict AFLAccording to the New National Defense Act of 2008 Section 2.3(a): The primary mission of the AFL shall be to defend the national sovereignty and territorial integrity of Liberia, including land, air and maritime territory, against external aggressions, insurgency, terrorism and encroachment. In addition thereto the AFL shall respond to natural disasters and engage in other civic works as may be required or directed. Have men and women in arms been abiding by sections 2.3 and 2.5 of our New National Defense Act?As Liberians celebrate another Armed Forces Day, it is crucial to recount some of those unethical behaviors of our new defense force which contravene democratic values. Some AFL soldiers have been orchestrating acts of torture, intimidation, harassment, extortion, abuse, and other inhumane treatments since 2010. This is a brief profile of allegations against military personnel in Liberia according to USA State Department Report:In April 2010, three AFL soldiers were accused of killing two civilians.On July 5, 2011 Harris Williams, an Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) soldier, allegedly killed Henry Freeman, a Liberia National Police (LNP) officer during a personal dispute.In July 2011, five AFL soldiers were relieved of their positions in Gbarnga for misconduct following allegations of assault against local residents.In 2012, an AFL disciplinary board investigates alleged misconduct and abuses by military security forces. Criminal cases were transferred to the LNP and MOJ for prosecution due to the lack of a military justice system.The military clampdown on West Point during the Ebola crisis in 2014 further exposed our new AFL’s inability to properly manage tension by complying with modern-day security ethics. The death of a teenager, Shaki Kamara, beating of armless civilians, and severe wounding of two young citizens by AFL personnel were acts of cruelty and unprofessionalism. I hope Shaki and others will have Justice in this matter!In December 2014, 30 soldiers of the AFL were dismissed for ‘abandoning’ their respective duty-station at the Edward Binyan Kesselly Barracks on the Roberts International Airport Highway. The continuous dismissal of military men is disturbing and this could put the security of the State at risk. We cannot continue to dismiss security officers without according them due process especially through a system of military justice (UCMJ). However, Liberia cannot build a ‘force for good’ when indiscipline is gradually creeping into our military. The misconduct of some soldiers is not surprising to me because intensive vetting and evaluation was not done during recruitment exercises. Today, our evolving AFL is not free from ex-combatants and renegades who were notably infamous for committing heinous atrocities and human rights abuses. Furthermore, some of these misbehaviors have been emanating from personal dissatisfactions and insufficient support from central government. From reliable sources, few of our barracks are experiencing reduction in manpower due to poor working relationship between Minister Brownie Samukai and the Soldiers. Lack of adequate funding, disposable income, incentive, and other support to men and women in arms is a major challenge to Liberia’s security sector as abandonment of post takes precedence.  Comparing AFL with Foreign Military ForcesI am yet to find a military force in West Africa to compare our new AFL to because this will further expose how weak our defense system is, judging from prevailing conditions. The Military of neighboring Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Ivory Coast is advanced than ours both in quantity and quality. The military of these three countries have more men, budgetary allocations, and modern equipments than Liberia. They have a stronger navy and air force to defend their territorial security and national interest. For example, Ivory Coast has a military budget of over US$541 million which is almost totaling Liberia’s annual budget.The United States, Russia, China, India, United Kingdom, France, Germany, South Korea, Italy, and Brazil have great armies today because of their willingness to invest more resources in security. No nation can remain or become powerful without advancing its security interest. The United States is great today because it has a defense budget of over US$689,591,000,000 with 1,477,896 active military personnel, 15,293 aircrafts, and 153,600,000 Labor Force.Egypt, Algeria, Ethiopia, South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Morocco, Tunisia, Angola, and Libya are proud to become Africa’s military superpowers in this 21st century because they have gone beyond understanding what it means to protect their territories from internal instability and external insecurity. In spite of its internal struggles, Egypt ranks number 13 in the World and number 1 in Africa in terms of military might. This North African Country has a defense budget of over US$4,400,000,000 with 468,500 active military personnel, 1,100 aircrafts, 4767 war tanks, and 27,000,000 labor force.I wish Liberia could become one of West Africa’s military superpowers in the not too distance future. This target is only achievable if those who are currently leading our country provide adequate support to men and women in arms. I challenge this sitting regime to considerably increase our military budget this coming fiscal year and lobby with foreign countries for logistical assistance and defense aids. I hope by 2017, Liberians will be able to point to an aircraft, gun-boat, war tank, helicopter, plane, and other modern military equipments. The need to build a strong Navy and Air Force is very vital to sustaining national security and consolidating genuine peace.Saluting Former and Fallen AFL Personnel Before this present government could embark on this journey of reforming the AFL since 2006, there were men and women of great valor who stood the test of time to ensure national security and territorial integrity. Their firm dedication to service has brought Liberia this far and we must not ignore those meaningful sacrifices they made to safeguard our State from dangers and disorders. We remain ever grateful to all of them who actively served our military with honesty and bravery from 1908 to 2003.The footprints of those former and fallen patriots portray an excellent emblem of loyalty and devotion to nation building. As we proceed towards developing an energetic military force, I hope our new soldiers will begin to emulate the good examples of those veterans. There is delight in saluting statesmen whose commitment to protecting public interest yesteryear is replete and I reserve no regret to flower ex-AFL soldiers with endless gratitude.They have played their part and we must do ours now in order to sustain what was started long before our arrival. Some of them are living with us today struggling to survive even though they spent their life and time serving a country that careless about them now. Others are dead, but their widows and children ramble in shackles everyday to overcome diversity of adversities. I thought this government should be providing decent retirement packages and benefits for widows and widowers of ex-Soldiers. Sadly, AFL widows are compelled to naked themselves and agitate in demand of their husbands’ just benefits. The government of President Sirleaf needs to do more in finding a long-lasting remedy to this dilemma. Appreciation to America The contribution of the United States of America to Liberia is worth commending. The collaboration between these two countries has come a long way and any attempt to sequentially narrate the benevolent assistance of America to Liberia will only render the pages of this article infinite. The good gesture of our longstanding partner (USA) is countless and priceless. I want to extend my earnest appreciation to all taxpaying citizens of America for supporting us during this epoch of restructuring a vibrant military force. Since Liberia began transforming its Military, the US government has made a commitment of US$95 million to train over 2,000 soldiers. This donation which comes from the combination of International Disaster and Famine Assistance, Regional Peacekeeping, and Foreign Military Assistance funds has upgraded the new AFL. We also appreciate DynCorp and Pacific Architects and Engineers (PAE) for coordinating with US military personnel to help transform our defense sector.We are grateful to the UN and other generous nations as well for their never-ending support to Liberia’s Security Sector Reform (SSR) agenda. The security needs of our country are too enormous and we cannot reach to the point of protecting ourselves without genuine global corporation and mutual alliance. We have recognized that less than 2500 military men are too small to ensure external and internal security. This figure does not commensurate with our current population. As UNMIL drawdown proceeds, we are pleading with the International Community to provide more assistance to our evolving AFL.Happy Armed Forces Day As it stands, Liberia does not have an army as a result of its tiny manpower, lack of military logistics, modern equipments, and technology, limited funding and labor force. It is a shame for our country to not even have an Air Force. I maintain that the current standing of Liberia’s military is between Battalion and Brigade. We are yet too far from achieving an army-status, but it is not impossible to get there as a nation. Our military can only graduate from a stage of infancy to maturity if the mindset of pubic trustees is driven by irreversible principles of transparency, accountability, patriotism, integrity, and selflessness.As our AFL clocks 58 years today, I humbly extend my sincere greetings and best wishes to the government and peace loving people of Liberia, men and women in arms, military civilians, ex-AFL soldiers, widows and widowers of fallen soldiers, family members, and friends. The surety of everlasting peace, inclusive development, and national integration cannot become a reality of this century in Liberia if security is not prioritized.About The Author: Martin K. N. Kollie is a Liberian youth activist, student leader, an emerging economist, and a young writer.  He is currently a student at the University of Liberia reading Economics and a member of the Student Unification Party (SUP).  His passion is to ensure a new Liberia of socio-economic equality and justice for all. He can be reached at: martinkerkula1989@yahoo.comShare this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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UBA Commissions New Cash Center in Bong County

first_imgThe new UBA cash center at Cuttington University offers convenience to customers of UBA in that county and its surrounding towns, with a full bouquet of products of the bank.The United Bank for Africa (UBA) has recently commissioned its new Cash Center in Suakoko, Gbarnga, Bong County.The new Cash Center, which is located on the main campus of the Cuttington University, is part of the bank’s expansion program to cover almost all the counties while coming closer to customers who have contributed to UBA’s success over the years.The new facility offers convenience to customers of UBA in that county and its surrounding towns, with a full bouquet of products of the bank.The event coincided with the launch of Cuttington University’s Visa Prepaid ID Card and brought together students, faculty, and staff of the University as well as UBA’s staff.Giving details of how the system will be helpful to students of the University, UBA’s Head of Digital Banking Prince Chesson bragged about the uniqueness of UBA’s Visa Card services being introduced to students of Cuttington University.Mr. Chesson said: “This system we are about to launch today will help you in all your financial transactions, including the payment of your school fees wherever you are; even if you graduated today from this University, this Visa Card you are about to get today will always help you in all your monetary transactions.”Commenting further, Chesson said the office will provide customers with advanced 24hr ATM service and make it possible for them to open an account, withdraw money, as well as deposit cash and checks. Other services include Africash, MoneyGram, Western Union, Nobel, among others.He said the Co-Branded Visa Prepaid ID Card will ease the constraints students experience during their registration process, by enabling students to pay their school fees from UBA’s point of sale terminals, online, and also provide access to their financial record, among several other great features.The CO- Branded Visa Pre-paid ID Card’s platform is a state-of-the-art payment and collection system that is expected to bring efficiency to the financial systems of universities in Liberia and serves as both ID and bank Card, he noted.Last month, UBA launched the same service for the graduate school of the African Methodist Episcopal University (AMEU).Speaking on behalf of the MD/CEO of UBA-Liberia, Melody Mezay-Ketter, who heads the bank’s Marketing & Corporate Communications Department, said the bank is pleased to implement innovative business ideas that won’t just bring income to the bank, but also make a difference in the financial sector of the country.She called on residents of Bong County to take advantage of the new cash office on the Cuttington Campus to carry on all their banking transactions.Ms. Precious Marshall, Associate Vice President for Internal Audits and Management Control at Cuttington University, expressed gratitude to UBA for the initiative.“To see a card that can do everything means that we are on top of technology, and we are getting there.For that, I say thank you again UBA,” she said.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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SD60 working to find classroom space while waiting for new schools

first_imgUntil the new schools can be built, SD60 must find ways to accommodate the ever-increasing numbers of students at the elementary school level.School District 60 Superintendent, Dave Sloan, listed a number of ways that the district can accommodate all the students until such time as new schools can be built. “Right now we are using utility spaces, rooms such as art rooms or music rooms, that aren’t designated as classrooms, as classrooms, until such time as we can deal with our shortage of space,” he said. “We have a projected two to three more years of increased enrolment before we can address the problem.”SD60 has conducted a very detailed space analysis, Sloan said, which sets out exactly where they have space and where the district’s pressure points are. They are considering the use of portable classrooms, but that takes money, he said, and in light of the Province’s recent budget cuts, it will be a challenge.- Advertisement -“We have already started a process at CM Finch, the library was converted into classroom space, and the space that was formerly computer space is now the library,” said Sloan. “There is the portable option, but it is expensive. We have some schools which have modular classrooms already attached to them.”Another strategy is to look at the actual spaces in the district, and perhaps consider shared catchment areas, such as between CM Finch and Central Elementary, so when they run out of room at one school, they can look at where the next nearest seats are available. It’s not an optimal solution, said Sloan, but one they can consider.Construction of any new school will take at least a year, but the key is the land, which the district now has the funds to purchase.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Cpl. Jodi Shelkie hands out D.A.R.E. certificates at Duncan Cran for the last time

first_imgStudents at Duncan Cran showed their appreciate to Cpl. Shelkie by showering her with gifts as the ceremonies finished.At this time, there is no officer designated to take over and teach the D.A.R.E. program in Fort St. John. 5 generations of D.A.R.E. graduates have learned valuable lessons in reacting to potentially dangerous situations, thanks to the expertise of Cpl. Jodi Shelkie with the Fort St. John RCMP.But today was the last day she would award certificates of D.A.R.E. completion to students at Duncan Cran Elementary — as this time next week, she will be in Kamloops with their local detachment.Cpl. Shelkie was born and raised in Fort St. John, and worked in Kamloops for several years before coming back to Fort St. John six and half years ago.- Advertisement -Now, on her last day with this detachment as a media liason, she told reporters leaving ‘feels strange,’ but sent her thanks out to the people here who supported her and the other officers at the detachment.“Always with a transfer, you’re excited about what’s coming up, but Fort St. John is a great town,” she said. “There are so many good and caring people in Fort St. John, who are making a difference and who are making this a great place.”Though some people have moved away, she said she will be reconnecting with people in Kamloops she knows; and should a media liason position open in Kamloops, she confirmed she would look into taking the position.Advertisementlast_img read more

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SANTA’S APPEARANCE IN MUFF VILLAGE SET TO HELP LOCAL COMMUNITY

first_imgSANTA Claus has agreed to put in a couple of extra appearances in Muff village this Christmas, we can reveal.A special grotto in the community park will open on Thursday, December 11.It’s understood Santa has agreed to donate all fees paid to see him to the Muff Resource Centre. A spokesman said: “Aye, he’s a generous old man.” SANTA’S APPEARANCE IN MUFF VILLAGE SET TO HELP LOCAL COMMUNITY was last modified: November 12th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:community parkmuffresoource centreSANTAlast_img read more

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LIMITED TICKETS AVAILABLE TO SEE THE FANTASTIC TOMMY FLEMING IN RAMELTON

first_imgENTERTAINMENT: The incredible talented artist Tommy Fleming is coming to Donegal next month. Fleming, will appear live in concert at The Town Hall, Ramelton next month on July 9th. Fleming is appearing in concert for the annual Lennon Festival.However, tickets to see one of Ireland’s most popular singers in concert are limited, so if you’re interested in seeing Fleming you need to get them NOW.Tickets are available from McFadden’s Shop, The Mall Ramelton and Whoriskey’s Ramelton.Tickets are just €30 to see one of Ireland’s best live performers in concert. LIMITED TICKETS AVAILABLE TO SEE THE FANTASTIC TOMMY FLEMING IN RAMELTON was last modified: June 22nd, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:concertEntertainmentFeaturesnewsRameltonTommy Fleminglast_img read more

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CASE OF UNDERAGE SEX IN DONEGAL GAELTACHT SPARKS HUGE LEGAL CASE

first_imgThe case of a 15 year old boy having sex with a 14 year old girl in the Donegal Gaeltacht has sparked a huge legal case in the Supreme Court.The court has been urged to overturn as unconstitutional the “Romeo and Juliet” laws that allow the prosecution of teenage boys for having sex with teenage girls but prevent prosecution of the girls.The five-judge court is hearing an appeal arising from a boy being charged under the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences) Act 2006 with having sex with a 14-year-old girl in Donegal. The boy is also charged with buggery. The trial of the boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, is on hold pending the outcome of an appeal.Section 3 of the 2006 Act created an offence of defilement of a child under 17 and provided for a sentence of up to five years imprisonment. Section 5 of the Act stated a girl under 17 cannot be guilty of such an offence.The Act arose in response to the Supreme Court’s “CC” judgment overturning as unconstitutional a 1935 law on underage sex on grounds of the absence of a defence of “reasonable mistake” as to the victim’s age.In the High Court in March 2010, Ms Justice Elizabeth Dunne ruled, while the law did amount to gender discrimination, that discrimination was not invidious, capricious or disproportionate.As the risk of pregnancy as a result of underage sex was borne by girls only, not boys, society was entitled to deter such activity and to place the burden of criminal sanction on those “who bear the least adverse consequences” of it, she said.The objective of the 2006 Act was to protect children from sexual abuse, and it dealt with a complex and wide range of sexual activities, circumstances and levels of culpability, she also noted.It provided immunity from prosecution applied to the one area of sexual activity that can result in pregnancy and the consequence of such carried no risk for boys or men. The risk was only borne by girls, she said.A study referred to during the case showed the younger the age of sexual intercourse, the greater the probability of a negative outcome such as the increased risk of unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, lower educational and job attainment and a greater risk of poverty, she noted.Outlining the boy’s appeal against that decision today, John O’Kelly SC said the kernel of the appeal was that both parties involved in this sexual act were children in law aged under 17 with only about a year between the two of them.The boy’s case was they engaged consensually in an act of sexual intercourse but under the Act, one of them was liable to be convicted and possibly jailed for up to five years while the other was guilty of no criminal offence at all.Mr Justice Nial Fennelly noted the 2006 Act is neutral as to whether the act of sexual intercourse is consensual or not and the court was not getting involved in that issue in the appeal.EndsCASE OF UNDERAGE SEX IN DONEGAL GAELTACHT SPARKS HUGE LEGAL CASE was last modified: April 15th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Donegal Gaeltachtlegal caseromeo and julietlast_img read more

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PACKIE BONNER LEADS TRIBUTES TO LOGAN OVER SCOTTISH CUP WIN

first_imgConrad celebrates with his team mates at Hampden ParkIRELAND and Celtic legend Packie Bonner has sent his best wishes to fellow Donegal man Conrad Logan after Hibernian’s astonishing 3-2 Scottish Cup final win over Rangers.Packie sent his congratulations to Hibs manager and former Celtic great Alan Stubbs and told Logan: “Been a while since a fine Donegal goalkeeper lifted the Scottish Cup – a real fairytale moment!”And it certainly is. Bonner played 642 times for Celtic winning four League Championships, three Scottish Cup winners’ medals and a League Cup winners’ medal.His last appearance for Celtic was actually winning the 1995 Scottish Cup final under Tommy Burns.Ramelton footballer Logan’s story is a fairytale one.He joined Leicester City as a youth player, regarded as a highly-rated 15-year-old, but struggled to make a mark in the first team and made just 30 appearances for the club in 10 years from 2005. He was sent out to Boston United (twice), Stockport County (twice), Luton Town, Bristol Rovers, Rotherham United and Rochdale on loan.And this year he found himself at Hibs after Alan Stubbs found himself in a goalkeeping crisis.He was the hero of the semi-final, saving two Dundee United penalties to earn a place in Saturday’s final against Rangers.He stood no chance with either of Rangers two goals.But that will all be forgotten has Hibs won their first Scottish Cup since 1902. PACKIE BONNER LEADS TRIBUTES TO LOGAN OVER SCOTTISH CUP WIN was last modified: May 22nd, 2016 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:conrad logandonegalPackie Bonnerlast_img read more

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Conditioning and hard work the main focus

first_img Teemu Selanne, one of the Ducks’ most popular players ever, rejoined the team last month and — like Giguere — was soaked with sweat but still smiling after the brisk workout. “I think the first day is always tough. Everybody’s going 100 miles per hour and everybody’s really excited,” Selanne said. ANAHEIM — Grueling drills, a lively scrimmage, then lots of laps. The players still smiled, happy just to be back on the ice. “We’ve been doing this since we were kids, so it’s great to be able to get out there and go to work again,” Anaheim goalie Jean-Sebastien Giguere, sweat still pouring down his face, said Tuesday after the Mighty Ducks held their first workout in nearly a year and a half. Carlyle, who took the Anaheim job after Mike Babcock’s contract expired and he became the Detroit Red Wings’ coach, said the Ducks’ veterans seemed to be in good physical condition despite missing last season, which was canceled by the NHL lockout. “It’s amazing. We did a testing of our rookie camp, then there was a testing done of all the veterans,” Carlyle said. “The level of conditioning was almost identical, which was a pleasant surprise. “For some of these players who haven’t played for some 16 months, it shows that there’s a commitment to preparation and that’s always a positive.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 Said Ruslan Salei: “It was really nice to finally be back out there with the team. Although I played in Russia last season, this is very different.” New coach Randy Carlyle, who promises the Ducks will play an upbeat style, ran them through a full-scale practice and scrimmage as a crowd of several hundred fans sat in the stands at the team’s practice facility. “Our expectations are that we’re going to try to play an up-tempo game, and our players seem to have responded positively to that,” Carlyle said. The workout certainly was up tempo. “Training camp’s not fun, especially the first day. It’s not supposed to be fun,” Carlyle said. “It’s about work. We understand that the players are getting a first opportunity to be put through their paces, and our work ethic and our commitment to conditioning will be very, very hard.” last_img read more

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